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Which clippings match 'Absurd' keyword pg.1 of 2
24 AUGUST 2017

Everything Is Terrible: a celebration of 80s retro cheesiness

"Everything Is Terrible! is the internet sensation video collective responsible for some of this millennium's most intriguing and mind melting videos. From Yogi Ogi Dogi, the creepy yoga farmer, to Cat Massage to Pubic Hair Dying to the Yellow Dino who hunts pedophiles; for 7 years EIT! has mined the absurd VHS universe for the best/worst bits. Every video is original and fantastic media art that creates a window into America's hidden past and future!"

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80s televisionabsurdAmerican popular cultureaural treasurebad tastecheesyclipscollection of video clipscultural history • dredge up • earnestness • Everything Is Terrible • exercise videos • hidden past • infomercials • kitschmelangemovie clipnaivety • over-earnestness • popular culture • postmodern masterwork • PSAretroretro cheesiness • terrible footage • VHSvideo archivevideo collection • video collective • web video • workout videos

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 MAY 2013

René Maltête: looking for surprise in the everyday

Photographs by French photographer and poet René Maltête (1930–2000).

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absurdblack and whitecuriositygeneticshumour • incongruity • paradox • philosophical dimension • photographerphotographyplayfulness • rayures • Rene Maltete • stripes • surprise • surrealist photography • surrealist spirit • visual metaphorvisual pun

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 JULY 2012

Fountain: an ordinary article of life without useful significance

"Fountain is one of Duchamp's most famous works and is widely seen as an icon of twentieth–century art. The original, which is now lost, consisted of a standard urinal, laid flat on its back rather than upright in its usual position, and signed 'R. Mutt 1917'. The Tate's work is a 1964 replica and is made from glazed earthenware painted to resemble the original porcelain. The signature is reproduced in black paint. Fountain is an example of what Duchamp called a 'readymade', an ordinary manufactured object designated by the artist as a work of art. It epitomises the assault on convention and good taste for which he and the Dada movement are best known.

The idea of designating such a lowly object as a work of art came from a discussion between Duchamp and his American friends the collector Walter Arensburg and the artist Joseph Stella. Following this conversation, Duchamp bought an urinal from a plumbers' merchants, and submitted it to an exhibition organised by the Society of Independent Artists. The Board of Directors, who were bound by the constitution of the Society to accept all members' submissions, took exception to the Fountain and refused to exhibit it. Duchamp and Arensburg, who were both on the Board, resigned immediately in protest. An article published at the time, which is thought to have been written by Duchamp, claimed, 'Mr Mutt's fountain is not immoral, that is absurd, no more than a bathtub is immoral. It is a fixture that you see every day in plumbers' shop windows. Whether Mr Mutt with his own hands made the fountain has no importance. He CHOSE it. He took an ordinary article of life, placed it so that its useful significance disappeared under the new title and point of view – created a new thought for that object.' ('The Richard Mutt Case', The Blind Man, New York, no.2, May 1917, p.5.)"

(Sophie Howarth, April 2000)

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1917196420th centuryabsurdAlfred Stieglitzartart historyassault • assault on convention • assault on good taste • avant-garde • black paint • contextconventioncultural signalscultural significance of objectscurationDadaDada movement • designated by the artist • everydayexhibition • fixture • Fountain (work of art) • glazed earthenware • good taste • icon of twentieth-century art • immoral • information in context • Joseph Stella • layers of meaning • lowly object • Marcel Duchampmodern artobjet trouve • ordinary article of life • ordinary manufactured objectporcelain • R. Mutt 1917 • readymadereplica • Society of Independent Artists • Tate Modern • took exception • twentieth-century art • urinaluseful significance • Walter Arensburg • work of art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 MAY 2012

Lucy McRae: body architect and synthetic biologist

"Lucy creates provocative and often grotesquely beautiful imagery that suggests a new breed existing in an alternate world.

Trained as a classical ballerina and architect her work inherently fascinates with the human body. The media call her inventor, friends call her a trailblazer. Either way, she relies on instinct to evolve an extraordinary visual path that is powerful, primal and uniquely Lucy McRae."

(Lucy McRae)

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absurd • alternate world • anatomyarchitecture • Bart Hess • beauty expressionbody • body architect • body morph • Champagne Valentine • classical ballerina • corporealcostume designfashionfashion body • future human • future human shapes • genetic manipulationgrotesquegrotesquely beautiful imageryhuman bodyhuman enhancement • human silhouette • ideal formintimate interfaces • invent and build • inventorlow-tech • Lucy McRae • LucyandBart • material world • new breed • performancephysical archetypeposthuman • primal • prostheticsprovocative • psychic-sexual • re-shape • scenario • shockingskinspeculative design • surrealist • synthetic biologist • transposing materialsvisceralvisual spectaclevisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 DECEMBER 2008

Coyle and Sharpe: pioneering street pranksters

"On San Francisco's Market Street last week, two somber–faced public–opinion 'pollsters' approached a young man, thrust a microphone in his face, and after a few minutes of earnest conversation asked: 'Would you be interested in helping future generations to fly?' When the young man said 'yes,' the pollsters asked: 'Well, then, would you let us graft a pair of chicken wings on your forehead?' The subject was dubious but the interviewers refused to give up. 'Well, how about just one wing?' they asked. 'It's absolutely painless, you know.' By the time the exasperated youth shouted: 'Get away from me, you crackpots,' it was too late. The dialogue was on tape, and the zany radio team of James Coyle and Malcome Sharpe had hooked another victim.

For the past eight months, Coyle and Sharpe have been roaming the streets of San Francisco looking for likely guinea pigs for their imaginative nonsense. So far, they have duped more than 3,500 San Franciscans into taking part in tape–recorded stunts broadcast a dozen times nightly over a KGO radio disk–jockey show. Combining some of the elements of 'Truth or Consequences' and 'Candid Camera,' Coyle and Sharpe have rapidly made themselves one of KGO's most popular features. Each week the pair gets more mail than any of the ABC station's other performers.

Coyle and Sharpe have, among other things, recruited a private army of 14,000 San Franciscans to invade Los Angeles to solve the smog problem; they have sold a clothing salesman on the notion of putting insects into the pockets of men's suits) to familiarize the buyers with entomology); they have tried to rent out the pigeons in Golden Gate Park at $1.50 an hour; they have asked people if they would permit cornflake advertisements to be printed in their eyeballs, and they once convinced a San Francisco businessman to give physical–fitness demonstrations on a pedestal in Union Square. The executive balked only after Coyle and Sharpe proposed thet he be attacked by a flock of trained birds 'to prove that people can exercise when under pressure.'"

(Newsweek, January 13 1964)

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absurdabsurditybelonging • Candid Camera • Coyle & Sharpe on the Loose • hidden microphone • human naturehumourimprovisationinterventioninterview • James Coyle • Jim Coyle • Mal Sharpe • Malcolm Sharpe • man-on-the-street • moral imaginationsparticipationperformancepioneeringprankradioSan Franciscosocial reality • terrorizations • truth or consequences

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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