Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Contemporary Practices' keyword pg.1 of 1
11 DECEMBER 2013

Divining a Digital Future - Paul Dourish and Genevieve Bell

"Ubiquitous computing (or 'ubicomp') is the label for a 'third wave' of computing technologies. Following the eras of the mainframe computer and the desktop PC, ubicomp is characterized by small and powerful computing devices that are worn, carried, or embedded in the world around us. The ubicomp research agenda originated at Xerox PARC in the late 1980s; these days, some form of that vision is a reality for the millions of users of Internet–enabled phones, GPS devices, wireless networks, and 'smart' domestic appliances. In Divining a Digital Future, computer scientist Paul Dourish and cultural anthropologist Genevieve Bell explore the vision that has driven the ubiquitous computing research program and the contemporary practices that have emerged––both the motivating mythology and the everyday messiness of lived experience.

Reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the authors' collaboration, the book takes seriously the need to understand ubicomp not only technically but also culturally, socially, politically, and economically. Dourish and Bell map the terrain of contemporary ubiquitous computing, in the research community and in daily life; explore dominant narratives in ubiquitous computing around such topics as infrastructure, mobility, privacy, and domesticity; and suggest directions for future investigation, particularly with respect to methodology and conceptual foundations."

Paul Dourish and Genevieve Bell (2011). "Divining a Digital Future: Mess and Mythology in Ubiquitous Computing", MIT Press, May 2011, ISBN 978–0–262–01555–4.

TAGS

1980s2011computer sciencecomputingcontemporary practices • contemporary ubiquitous computing • cultural anthropologydaily lifedesktop computer • desktop PC • Divining a Digital Future (book) • domesticity • embedded in the world around us • everyday messiness • feature phone • future investigation • Genevieve Bell • GPS devices • infrastructureinterdisciplinary collaboration • internet-enabled phones • lived experiencemainframemobility • Paul Dourish • privacyresearch communityresearch methodology • small and powerful computing devices • smart domestic appliances • smart phones • third wave of computing technologies • ubicomp • ubicomp research • ubiquitous computing • ubiquitous computing research • wireless networkswornXerox PARC

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
16 MARCH 2013

Constructing Models for Practitioner-Based Research

"This paper considers differing understandings about the role and praxis of practitioner–based research for the arts. Over more than a decade the nexus between theory and practice has been a point of debate within the contemporary arts school both in Australia and overseas. This paper attempts to reveal ways of approaching this issue from within and across the disciplines. Discussions with colleagues from the arts representing fields as diverse as music, visual arts, creative writing, women's studies, dance and theatre studies indicate that the research principles explored, albeit briefly, here have resonance for each of these disciplines. Consequently, in an attempt to be broadly relevant for these diverse fields I have chosen to position the model as practitioner–based. Within this widened context I will be exploring the different ways in which studio–based practitioners and academics conceptualise the processes and characteristics of research in the arts and professional practice. However, as this is still work in progress, my exemplars will largely reflect my own field of the visual arts. Further research will enable this model to expand.

Presented is a way to conceptualise and explain what we do as studio–based researchers in the arts. In so doing I am recognising that contemporary practices in the arts reflect a meridian era of evolution, which requires us to be articulate practitioners. This includes being able to analyse and write about our practice in sophisticated ways. I see practitioner–based research and the resultant exploration of personal praxis as a way to achieve this. What I propose is that as artists we open up a larger domain by recontextualizing and reinterpreting aspects of standard mainstream research processes, looking at the resemblances, the self–resemblances and the differences between traditional and practitioner–based research methods as a logic of necessity."

(Robyn Stewart, 2001)

TEXT Vol Vol 5 No 2 October 2001 [http://www.griffith.edu.au/school/art/text/]

TAGS

2001academics • articulate practitioners • artists • arts fields • arts researchcontemporary artscontemporary practicescreative artscreative practicecreative writingdanceinvestigative praxis • logic of necessity • music practice • personal praxispractitioner-based research • practitioner-based research methods • praxisprofessional practicerecontextualisationresearch in the arts • research principles • research processesRobyn Stewartstudio practicestudio-based enquiry • studio-based practitioners • studio-based researcher • TEXT (journal) • theatre studies • theory and practicevisual artswomens studies

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 JANUARY 2013

empyre: critical perspectives on contemporary cross-disciplinary issues, practices and events in networked media

"–empyre– facilitates critical perspectives on contemporary cross–disciplinary issues, practices and events in networked media by inviting guests –key new media artists, curators, theorists, producers and others to participate in thematic discussions.

–empyre– is an Australian based global community which preserves its autonomy as a non–hierarchical collaborative entity by engaging with new content on a monthly basis. The list was instigated by Melinda Rackham (AU) in 2002. The community grew exponentially and within the first year Adrian Miles (AU) and Rebecca Cannon (AU) joined briefly as facilitators. Long–term facilitators Christina McPhee (USA) and Michael Arnold Mages (USA) were invited to the –empyre– curatorium soon after, and during the next years they were joined by Jim Andrews (CA)and Felix Sattler (AU/GER). In 2005 Tracey Meziane (AU) and Marcus Bastos (BR) joined the team, and in 2006 and 2007 it was extended with Sérgio Basbaum (BR), Nicholas Ruiz III (USA), Renate Ferro (USA) and Tim Murray (USA). To find out more go to who is –empyre–"

(Melinda Rackham)

TAGS

2002 • Adrian Miles • Australian • Christina McPhee • contemporary practicescritical perspectivescross-disciplinary • cross-disciplinary issues • cross-disciplinary knowledge communitycross-disciplinary research • curatorium • dOCUMENTA (festival) • empyre • Felix Sattler • fibrecultureglobal community • Jim Andrews • Marcus Bastos • Melinda Rackham • Michael Arnold Mages • network society • networked media • new content • new media • new media artists • new media curators • new media producers • new media theorists • Nicholas Ruiz • non-hierarchical collaborative entity • Rebecca Cannon • Renate Ferro • Sergio Basbaum • thematic discussions • Tim Murray • Tracey Meziane

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.