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Which clippings match 'Munich' keyword pg.1 of 1
08 NOVEMBER 2015

Addiction is a social (rather than individual) phenomenon

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2D animation • adaptive state • addictionaffective consumptionalcohol abuse • alcoholism • behavioral addiction • behavioural psychology • Bruce Alexander • chemical dependencycompulsive behaviourdrug addiction • drug dependence • drug taking • drug use • gambling • gambling addiction • human agencyhuman connection • in a nutshell • information design • Johann Hari • kurzgesagt • life crisis • mental health disorders • Moby Digg • Munich • negative consequences • out of control • overdose • parallax scrolling effect • Philipp Dettmer • physical dependency • pornography addiction • punishmentscrolling experiencesociabilitysocial agencysocial behaviour • social connection • social experimentssocial interaction • social isolation • social responsibility • Stephan Rether • substance abusesubstance dependencetraumatroopsunhealthy behaviourVietnam war • war on drugs • YouTube channel

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JANUARY 2013

1937 Munich exhibition of Degenerate Art

"00:25:43 Wide view of the new House of German Art, a museum dedicated to Nazi–approved artwork, with long, white columns. 00:26:03 Across the street, INTs of the 1937 exhibition of Entartete Kunst ['Degenerate Art'] on the second floor of the Institute of Archaeology. Room 1 with 'Kruzifixus' [Crucified Christ] sculpture by Ludwig Gies (1921), formerly in Luebeck cathedral. 00:26:66 Room 3 with 'Maedchen mit blauem Haar' [Girl with Blue Hair] by Eugen Hoffmann. Wall text refers to a Kandinsky piece 'Zweierlei Rot' (1928) purchased for the National Gallery in Berlin for 2,000 marks as 'paid by taxes from the working German people.' 00:26:39 Wide view of the crowds in Room 3, including the mocking inscription by Georg Grosz, 'Nehmen Sie Dada ernst! Es lohnt sich.' [Take Dada seriously! It's worth it.] Male docent showing visitors Room 3 with 'Springendes Pferd' [Jumping Horse] by expressionist Heinrich Campendonk from the National Gallery and the small painting 'Um den Fisch' [Around the Fish] by Paul Klee. 00:27:13 Visitors moving through Room 3, looking at sculptures beneath an inscription in wavy lines, 'We act as if we were painters, poets, or whatever, but we...are just putting one giant swindle over on the world....' 00:27:24 Exhibit lobby with large head sculpture 'Der neue Mensch' [The New Man] by Otto Freundlich (1912), which was used for the cover of the exhibition guide. 00:27:37 EXTs, people coming out of the building, car and bicycle pass by on the street. Large sign over exhibition entrance: 'Ausstellung 'Entartete Kunst' Eintritt frei.' [Exhibition 'Degenerate Art' Free entrance.] INT, Room 4 with 'Der Strand' [The Beach] by Max Beckmann. 00:28:00 Profile view of two women looking at paintings by Ernst Kirchner and Oskar Kokoschka in Room 4 with 'Sitzender Mann' [Sitting Man] by Erich Heckel of the artists' group 'Die Bruecke' [The Bridge] and 'Die Mulattin' [The Mulatto Woman] by Emil Nolde behind them. Men view works in Room 4 and move through exhibit. 00:28:33 Room 5 with 'Bahnhof in Koenigstein' [Koenigstein station] by Ernst Kirchner, 'Blumen und Tieren' [Flowers and Animals] by Heinrich Campendonk (1926), 'Handstand' by Willi Baumeister, 'Im Kanu' [In the Canoe] by Jean Metzinger, 'Komposition' [Composition] by Piet Mondrian (1929), 'Stilleben' [Still Life] by Karl Schmitt–Rottluff (1932). 00:29:07 The inscription over the doorway from Room 6 to Room 7, 'Sie hatten vier Jahre Zeit.' [They had four years' time.] In Room 1, 'Christus und die Suenderin' [Christ and the Sinner] by Emil Nolde (1929). Visitors before the Dada wall in Room 3, pan to right."

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1937 • degenerate art • deviant status • Emil Nolde • Entartete Kunst • Erich Heckel • Ernst Kirchner • Eugen Hoffmann • exhibitionExhibition of Degenerate Art • Georg Grosz • Heinrich Campendonk • House of German Art • Jean Metzinger • Julien Bryan • Karl Schmitt-Rottluff • Kruzifixus • Ludwig Gies • Max Beckmann • modern artMunichmuseumNazi Germany • Nazi-approved artwork • Oskar Kokoschka • Otto Freundlich • out-groups • Paul Klee • Piet MondrianUnited States Holocaust Memorial Museum • Wassily Kandinsky • white columns • Willi Baumeister

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JANUARY 2013

Call to Order: the pretentious sterility of culture

"In a masterstroke of design, the curator of Chaos and Classicism, Kenneth Silver, chose a work of art to illustrate the Nazi annexation of neoclassicism that at first glance is anything but threatening. The Four Elements by Adolf Ziegler decorated the walls of Hitler's Munich apartment. A member of the Nazi Party, Ziegler was charged by Hitler in 1937 to stage–manage the purge of modern art in the notorious Exhibition of Degenerate Art. Ziegler's depiction of four nude women who symbolize fire, earth, air and water, the four elements of nature recognized in antiquity, personifies little but the pretentious sterility of culture under the Third Reich. Yet, it is the perfect embodiment of the banality of evil."

(Ed Voves, 4 October 2010)

Fig.1 Adolf Ziegler, The Four Elements: Fire, Water and Earth, Air, (Die vier Elemente. Feuer, Wasser und Erde, Luft), before 1937, Oil on canvas, three panels, left to right: 170.3 x 85.2 cm, 171 x 190.8 cm, and 161.3 x 76.7 cm, Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen, Sammlung Moderner Kunst in der Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich.

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1937Adolf Hitler • Adolf Ziegler • air • antiquitybanalitycall to orderchaos and classicismclassical beautyclassical formcorrectioncultural productionEarth • elements • emasculation • essential elements of artessentialismExhibition of Degenerate Artfascismfire • Kenneth Silver • masterstroke of design • modern artmodernismMunichnatureNazi • Nazi Party • neoclassical revivalneoclassicismnude women • pretentious sterility of culture • purificationpurity • racial purity • return to ordersterility • The Four Elements • Third Reichwaterwork of art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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