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Which clippings match 'Thailand' keyword pg.1 of 2
27 FEBRUARY 2015

The reality of shark fin soup served at Chinese wedding banquets

"The majority of the demand for shark meat is from the shark–fin industry, centered in Asia. Singapore is one of the main consumer countries, along with Mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Malaysia and Thailand. For every Chinese wedding banquet in Singapore that serves shark fin soup, the world loses another 40–50 sharks."

(Animal Concerns Research and Education Society)

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2012 • alpha predator • Animal Concerns Research and Education Society • animal cruelty • animal welfare • animated ad • anthropocentrism • apex predator • Asia-Pacificbarbaric practices • cartilage • Central America • Chinese soup spoon • Chinese wedding banquet • Costa Rica • crude barbarism • cruelty to animals • cultural practicesdestructive practicesethical consequencesethical consumption • fin • food productionhave dominion over all other living creaturesHong Kong • human supremacy • humane treatment of animals • inhumane treatment of animals • instrumental view of nature • Mainland China • MalaysiaPeoples Republic of Chinaporcelainredshark • shark fin soup • shark finning • shark meat • shark-fin industry • Singaporesoup • soup spoon • South-East Asia • spoon • status symbol • super predator • systemised crueltyTaiwanThailand • top predator • top-level predator • unnecessary suffering • video campaign • wanton destruction • wasteful destruction • wasteful practice • wedding banquet • wedding celebration • wedding ceremonywildlife reserveswillful ignorance

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 SEPTEMBER 2014

To Singapore, with Love: Singaporean political exiles remember

"Some places are better observed from a distance if you want to grasp their inner essence. For this portrait of her hometown, the tropical economic powerhouse of Singapore, Tan Pin Pin decided on a strictly external perspective. She meets with political exiles in London, Thailand, and Malaysia who had to leave the city thirty–five or fifty years ago–and who are to this day not permitted to return unless they die and their relatives bring back their ashes. The protagonists of the film fought for increased democracy and for Singapore to be freed from colonialism. They escaped long prison sentences and judicial capriciousness, but at the price of exile. They have a heightened view of the city today, full of dreams yet also analytical: To Singapore, with Love [星国恋] is a homage to individual fighters whose lives have been shaped by emigration. They tell their stories more as utopians than as victims, opening up amazing perspectives on an ultra–modern city in a democratic coma as well as on life in exile, whose path is never straightforward for those who do not lose sight of their goals, even when far away from home."

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2013activist • Asian Cinema Fund • British Colonial Government • Busan International Film Festival • card carrying communist • censorshipcolonialismcommunism • communist party • democratic coma • detention without trial • displaced • documentary film • emigration • English countryside • escape • exile • fled • homagehometown • Internationale Filmfestspiele Berlin • judicial capriciousness • life in exile • lives • Malaysia • not permitted to return • political exile • political exiles • political persuasion • prison sentence • Singapore • Singaporean • student leader • Tan Pin Pin • Thailand • To Singapore with Love (2013) • United Kingdom • utopian

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 OCTOBER 2013

Thai Health Promotion Foundation: Smoking Kid campaign

"The Thai Health Promotion Foundation (THPF) used child actors to get adult smokers to think seriously about taking their own advice on the effects of smoking. In the Thai cultural context, adults naturally take action to educate children whenever they misbehave. However, when adults themselves repeat the children's action, they overlook that misbehavior. Children carrying cigarettes approached adults in smoking areas outside busy buildings, asking for a light. Adults commonly refused and warned the children not to smoke. The children asked the adults why they themselves were smoking and gave them a 'quit smoking' brochure. The campaign won a Bronze Outdoor Lion at Cannes in 2012, Gold Special Event and Silver Online awards at the 2013 Clio AWards, Gold for Special Service at the One Show Awards, a Silver Film Lotus at the 2013 Adfest Awards."

(Duncan Macleod, 4 June 2013, The Inspiration Room)

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2012 • Adfest Awards • advertising campaignaltruismappealbrochureCannes Film Festivalchanging our relation • child actor • childrencigarettes • Clio Awards • co-suffering • cognitive dissonancecompassion • concern for others • desire to help • distanced viewpoint • duty of care • emotive manipulationempathetic consciousnessharmhealthheld in abeyanceInspiration Room • kid • pathospersuasively suggestivepsychical distancepublic health campaign • quit smoking • self-harm • smoking area • smoking cigarettes • Smoking Kid (campaign) • Thai Health Promotion Foundation • Thailand • The One Club • THPF

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 DECEMBER 2011

Design for enabling sustainable livelihoods in communities

"This paper focuses on how designers can contribute to enabling sustainable livelihoods in communities, especially communities of people with physical disabilities. This is a new area of design research and practice. The paper draws on a case study of the role and contribution of designers in one of the most disadvantaged communities in a semi–urban area of Thailand between 2007 and 2010. This was a collaborative project with nineteen community members with physical impairment in the Samutprakran province. This community had a long history of developing crafts for income generation. The aim was to explore and test new approaches that would result in a model leading to alternative livelihoods, including transforming their capabilities and using available resources in their community to achieve positive outcomes. Participatory Action Research (PAR), Human–Centered Design (HCD) and Sustainable Livelihoods Approach (SLA) were employed as research strategies and approaches. The project was structured around three workshops targeting three successive stages: 1) recruiting participants for a case study and facilitating the gathering of their own data and doing the necessary analysis; 2) enabling them to create and make their own choices to improve their situation; and 3) monitoring and evaluating the effectiveness of the implementation. There were four key findings. Firstly, the community participants stated that they had achieved the livelihood goals that they desired. They also devised a complementary income–generating activity which enabled them to continue to improve their capabilities, earn income and reinforce their value in their community, and to reduce their vulnerability. From the researcher's perspective, PAR integrated with HCD and combined with SLA were shown to be effective strategies and approaches because they facilitate the transfer of knowledge to the participants, giving them both incentive and ownership in their ideas and actions, enabling them to create and pursue their own solutions. Finally, this study demonstrated the benefits of reorientation of the designer's role from that of a solution provider to that of an agent of sustainable change."

(Siriporn Peters, 4 May 2011)

2). Siriporn Peters (2011). "Design for enabling sustainable livelihoods in communities", Iridescent: Icograda Journal of Design Research ISSN 1923–5003.

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academic journal • alternative livelihoods • capabilities • case studycommunity • community participants • community-generated content • complementary income-generating activity • craftdata gatheringdesign research • design research and practice • disabilitydisadvantaged communitiesHCDhuman-centred design • income generation • livelihood • livelihood goals • ownershipPARParticipatory Action Research • people with physical disabilities • physical disabilities • physical impairmentresearch and practiceresearch approachesresearch strategies • semi-urban • SLA • sustainability • sustainable change • sustainable livelihoods • sustainable livelihoods approach • Thailandtransfer of knowledgetransformationvulnerabilityworkshops

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 MAY 2011

Eric Whitacre: virtual musical collaboration via YouTube

"Well a couple of years ago, a friend of mine emailed me a link, a YouTube link, and said, 'You have got to see this.' And it was this young woman who had posted a fan video to me, singing the soprano line to a piece of mine called 'Sleep.'

(Video) Britlin Losee: Hi Mr. Eric Whitacre. My name is Britlin Losee, and this is a video that I'd like to make for you. Here's me singing 'Sleep.' I'm a little nervous, just to let you know. ♫ If there are noises ♫ ♫ in the night ♫

Eric Whitacre: I was thunderstruck. Britlin was so innocent and so sweet, and her voice was so pure. And I even loved seeing behind her. I could see the little teddy bear sitting on the piano behind her in her room. Such an intimate video.

And I had this idea: if I could get 50 people to all do this same thing, sing their parts –– soprano, alto, tenor and bass –– wherever they were in the world, post their videos to YouTube, we could cut it all together and create a virtual choir. So I wrote on my blog, 'OMG OMG.' I actually wrote, 'OMG,' hopefully for the last time in public ever. (Laughter) And I sent out this call to singers. And I made free the download of the music to a piece that I had written in the year 2000 called 'Lux Aurumque', which means 'light and gold.' And low and behold, people started uploading their videos.

Now I should say, before that, what I did is I posted a conductor track of myself conducting. And it's in complete silence when I filmed it, because I was only hearing the music in my head, imagining the choir that would one day come to be. Afterwards, I played a piano track underneath so that the singers would have something to listen to. And then as the videos started to come in ...

(Singing) This is Cheryl Ang from Singapore.

(Singing) This is Evangelina Etienne

(Singing) from Massachusetts.

(Singing) Stephen Hanson from Sweden.

(Singing) This is Jamal Walker from Dallas, Texas.

(Singing)

There was even a little soprano solo in the piece, and so I had auditions. And a number of sopranos uploaded their parts. I was told later, and also by lots of singers who were involved in this, that they sometimes recorded 50 or 60 different takes until they got just the right take –– they uploaded it. Here's our winner of the soprano solo. This is Melody Myers from Tennessee. (Singing) I love the little smile she does right over the top of the note –– like, 'No problem, everything's fine.'

(Laughter)

And from the crowd, emerged this young man, Scott Haines. And he said, 'Listen, this is the project I've been looking for my whole life. I'd like to be the person to edit this all together.' I said, 'Thank you, Scott. I'm so glad that you found me.' And Scott aggregated all of the videos. He scrubbed the audio. He made sure everything lined up. And then we posted this video to YouTube about a year and a half ago. This is 'Lux Aurumque' sung by the Virtual Choir.

(Singing)

I'll stop it there in the interest of time. (Applause)

Thank you. Thank you.

(Applause)

Thank you. So there's more. There's more. Thank you so much.

And I had the same reaction you did. I actually was moved to tears when I first saw it. I just couldn't believe the poetry of all of it –– these souls all on their own desert island, sending electronic messages in bottles to each other. And the video went viral. We had a million hits in the first month and got a lot of attention for it. And because of that, then a lot of singers started saying, 'All right, what's Virtual Choir 2.0?' And so I decided for Virtual Choir 2.0 that I would choose the same piece that Britlin was singing, 'Sleep', which is another work that I wrote in the year 2000 –– poetry by my dear friend Charles Anthony Silvestri. And again, I posted a conductor video, and we started accepting submissions. This time we got some more mature members. (Singing) And some younger members.

(Video) Soprano: ♫ Upon my pillow ♫ ♫ Safe in bed ♫ EW: That's Georgie from England. She's only nine. Isn't that the sweetest thing you've ever seen?

Someone did all eight videos –– a bass even singing the soprano parts. This is Beau Awtin. (Video) Beau Awtin: ♫ Safe in bed ♫

EW: And our goal –– it was sort of an arbitrary goal –– there was an MTV video where they all sang 'Lollipop' and they got people from all over the world to just sing that little melody. And there were 900 people involved in that. So I told the singers, 'That's our goal. That's the number for us to beat.' And we just closed submissions January 10th, and our final tally was 2,051 videos from 58 different countries. Thank you. (Applause) From Malta, Madagascar, Thailand, Vietnam, Jordan, Egypt, Israel, as far north as Alaska and as far south as New Zealand.

And we also put a page on Facebook for the singers to upload their testimonials, what it was like for them, their experience singing it. And I've just chosen a few of them here. 'My sister and I used to sing in choirs together constantly. Now she's an airman in the air force constantly traveling. It's so wonderful to sing together again!' I love the idea that she's singing with her sister. 'Aside from beautiful music, it's great just to know I'm part of a a worldwide community of people I never met before, but who are connected anyway.' And my personal favorite, 'When I told my husband that I was going to be a part of this, he told me that I did not have the voice for it.' Yeah, I'm sure a lot of you have heard that too. Me too. 'It hurt so much, and I shed some tears, but something inside of me wanted to do this despite his words. It is a dream come true to be part of this choir, as I've never been part of one. When I placed a marker on the Google Earth Map, I had to go with the nearest city, which is about 400 miles away from where I live. As I am in the Great Alaskan Bush, satellite is my connection to the world.'

So two things struck me deeply about this. The first is that human beings will go to any lengths necessary to find and connect with each other. It doesn't matter the technology. And the second is that people seem to be experiencing an actual connection. It wasn't a virtual choir. There are people now online that are friends; they've never met. But, I know myself too, I feel this virtual esprit de corps, if you will, with all of them. I feel a closeness to this choir –– almost like a family.

What I'd like to close with then today is the first look at 'Sleep' by Virtual Choir 2.0. This will be a premier today. We're not finished with the video yet. You can imagine, with 2,000 synchronized YouTube videos, the render time is just atrocious. But we do have the first three minutes. And it's a tremendous honor for me to be able to show it to you here first. You're the very first people to see this. This is 'Sleep,' the Virtual Choir. ...

Eric Whitacre: Thank you very, very much. Thank you. (Applause) Thank you very much. Thank you. Thank you."

(TED Talks, 2011)

Fig.1 'Eric Whitacre: A virtual choir 2,000 voices strong', filmed March 2011, posted April 2011

Fig.2 'Lux Aurumque'

Fig.3 Eric Whitacre's Virtual Choir 2.0, 'Sleep'

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TAGS

20102011AlaskaAotearoa New Zealandauthorship • Beau Awtin • Britlin Losee • Charles Anthony Silvestri • Cheryl Ang • choircollaborationdigital collaborationdigital narcissismdistributed interactionEgyptEric Whitacre • Evangelina Etienne • Georgie from England • globalisation • Google Earth Map • innovationinteractionintrospective technocultureIsrael • Jamal Walker • Jordan • Juilliard School • Lux Aurumque • MadagascarMalta • Melody Myers • musicnetwork societyorchestraparticipationremix culture • Scott Haines • social fragmentation • Stephen Hanson • technologically-rendered spaceTED TalksThailanduser-generated contentVietnamviralvirtual auditioningvirtual bandvirtual choir • Virtual Choir 2.0 • virtual collaborationvoicesworldwide communityYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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