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Which clippings match 'Claustrophobic Spaces' keyword pg.1 of 1
11 OCTOBER 2015

David Cross: A Question of Trust (visceral and embodied experience)

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2015actions have consequencesaesthetic spectacleaffect theory • anecdote • anthropomorphismAustralian artistclaustrophobic spaces • concepts of affect • David Cross • Deakin Universitydisarmamentembodimentfeel thingshandlehold mehuman bodyhyper-sensualityinflatableinstallation sculptureintimate transaction • non visual art • phobia • playful spacepropinquitypublic artscopophiliasense of touch • sensory modalities • sensory phenomenashow (spectacle)social exchangespatial intimacytactile experienceTED Talks • TEDxDeakinUniversity • touch metrust • unguarded experience • visceral experiencevisceral journeyvisceral theorywe experience the world

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 JULY 2015

The Phone Box: allegory about the consequences of dehumanisation

"In a bland square in Madrid, some workers, who are wearing a strange uniform, are installing a phone box. Some moments later, an anonymous citizen, after taking his son to the school bus, gets trapped in the box for no understandable reason. As the day goes by, all kind of strangers go there to see the strange event: some of them try to free him; others make fun of him… Everyone looks interested in this little man. After a distressing delay full of surrealistic moments, the trapped man is taken to a strange factory full of thousands of phone boxes. In each one, a single corpse is trapped, in some strange ritual. The movie ends with a new phone box in another square of the city."

(Aaron Rodriguez, World Cinema Directory)

Antonio Mercero (1972). "La Cabina/The Phone Box", -phone booth location: Calle de Rodríguez San Pedro, 5, Madrid, Spain [http://filmap.tumblr.com/post/98879196634/la-cabina-antonio-mercero-1972-phone-booth-calle].

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1972absurd situationsallegory • Antonio Mercero • black tale • caught in a trap • claustrophobic spacescyclical narrativedehumanisation • dehumanised society • distressdisturbing taleenclosed space • entrapment • environment as antagonist • eternal cycle • fait accomplifantasy about deathfeelings of panic • futility • get me the hell out of here • helplessness • high concept • Jose Luis Garci • Jose Luis Lopez Vazquez • La cabina (1972) • macabreMadrid • mummified remains • no escape • phone booth • powerlesspsychological horrorsadisticsarcophagusshort filmSpanish filmspeculative fictionsymbolic meaning • telephone booth • telephone box • The Telephone Box (1972) • tombtrapped • twisted game

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 JANUARY 2011

8 1/2 film intro shows protagonist in arrested moment

"Opening the film is a title card introducing the producer, the title of the film, and the film's director. That cuts to a tracking shot of a car in traffic, and then another cut to a shot from above the cars to show the congestion (this shot tracks them from right to left). At the end of that shot, there is a cut to the back of the main character, Guido's, head. The camera then moves to the left and shows the two people in the car sitting next to him. The camera comes back to Guido in his own car as he begins wiping the inside of his windshield. Smoke begins to fill the car. Guido plays with the buttons in the car and desperately tries to escape. There is another cut to a shot of people hanging out of a bus and people stuck in their cars. They seem to be frozen in time. The film then cuts to another shot, this time from outside the car, of Guido trying to get out. The camera pans to a man who is staring at Guido from another car. After we see Guido pounding at the window, the shot cuts to a man touching a woman's arm in another car. The camera then pans to more cars waiting in traffic and then finally comes back upon Guido's smoke–filled car. The shot then cuts to Guido finally making it out of the car through the window. He climbs atop the car. Then the shot cuts to another shot of a man in a different car watching him intently. The camera zooms out and we see the bus and then Guido somehow floating atop the cars, out of the traffic. The shot then cuts to his legs and tilts upwards to show his entire backside, his coat waving the wind, and him slowly raising his arms towards the sky. Then there is a cut (fade–in) to Guido flying through the sky, then another to just the clouds. As the camera glides through the clouds, it is ambiguous of whether there is another cut or if the camera just happens upon a structure of some sort. Then there is a solid cut to a man atop a horse that is galloping on a beach. We see a man in a white shirt tugging a rope. The shot then cuts to another shot of a leg with a rope wrapped around it, and we can see the man in the white shirt and the man on the horse on the ground in the background. The scene then cuts again to the man in the white shirt running around the beach tugging on the rope, and then again to the foot with the rope (which the man is trying to get off). The sequence then cuts again to the man who was on the horse holding papers, then to the body of the man whose foot was tied to the rope being tugged down and falling into the ocean."

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1963 • 8 1/2 • arresting momentsarresting time • beginning sequence • black and whitebuscarclaustrophobic spacesdream sequencedrivingfamous sceneFederico Fellinifrozen in the momentfrozen in timefrozen momentgassing • Gianni Di Venanzo • in media resinfluential works • intro sequence • introduction • introductory sequence • Italian cinema • Marcello Mastroianni • motorway • opening sequence • Otto e mezzo • threshold spacetime slowed downtraffic congestion • traffic jam • trapped

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 FEBRUARY 2006

Claustrophobic spaces of German modernity and agoraphobic spaces of American post-war film genres

"Running throughout our essay as its leitmotif is the opposition between the claustrophobic spaces of German modernity (epitomized in Expressionist cinema and in the noir films directed by Germans in Hollywood) and the agoraphobic fear of wide open spaces, exemplified by post–war American space (suburbia and the urban "superblock") and by the post–war film genres of the western and the road movie. Lacking a frontier myth, Germans fantasized about an expansive sense of space and dreaded a claustrophobic one. By contrast, the American cinema developed a morbid fear of open spaces devoid of human community and fantasized about the possibility of a tightly–knit urban community."

(Ed Dimendberg and Anton Kaes)

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agoraphobia • American • Anton Kaes • claustrophobiaclaustrophobic spaces • Edward Dimendberg • expansive sense of space • expressionism • Expressionist cinema • filmfrontierfrontier mythgenreGermanGerman Expressionism • German modernity • Hollywood • human community • modernist architecturemodernityopen countrysideopen spacesperiurbanisationpost-war • post-war American space • post-war film genres • postwar • road movie • suburbia • superblock • tightly-knit urban community • urban • urban superblock • Westernwestern film genre • wide open spaces

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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