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22 JUNE 2013

The NFSA Life In Australia Series

Fig.1 James Jeffrey (1966). "Life In Australia: Adelaide": 20.25 Minutes. Made by The Commonwealth Film Unit / Department of Immigration 1966. Directed by James Jeffrey. A picture of life in the South Australian capital of Adelaide in the mid 1960s, social, commercial and recreational.
Fig.2 "Life In Australia: Brisbane", Fig.3 "Guide To Canberra", Fig.4 "Darwin – Doorway To Australia", Fig.5 "Life In Australia: Hobart", Fig.6 "Life In Australia: Melbourne", Fig.7 "Life In Australia: Perth", Fig.8 "Life In Australia: Sydney".

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1960s1966Adelaideadvertising imagesaudio and visual heritageaudiovisual archiveAustralia • Australian capital cities • Australian culture • Australian Department of Immigration • Australian ScreenBrisbaneCanberracommercial sector • Commonwealth Film Unit • cultural life • Darwin • Eric Thompson • European Australianseveryday cultureGreat Britain • Hobart • idylidyllic imageimmigrantimmigration • James Jeffrey • life in Australia • Life in Australia Series • lifestyleMelbourneNational Archives of AustraliaNational Film and Sound ArchivenewsreelNFSAPerthportrait of everyday liferecreational activitiessocial sectorSouth AustraliaSydney • ten pound pom • ten pound tourist • UK • welcoming immigrants • white Australia policy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JANUARY 2013

Metro-land: romanticising the mundane

Metro–Land, the 1973 BBC documentary was Sir John Betjeman's "gift to romanticise the mundane: in this case a tube ride from Baker Street to Amersham, celebrating the north–west London suburbs created by the Metropolitan Railway between 1910 and 1933. ...

'Metro–Land' was the advertising slogan developed to entice workers from cramped homes in Central London out into the rural paradise of Middlesex, Hertfordshire and Buckinghamshire. It was invented in 1915 by the Metropolitan Railway's in–house copywriter James Garland, who according to legend was ill with influenza and sprang out of bed when he thought of the term. ...

It was, of course, largely a con. The creation of Metro–Land destroyed the very thing – open countryside – which was used to advertise it. The speculative homes thrown up around the new stations bore few resemblances to the Tudor cottages depicted in the advertising materials: most were dreary semis, constructed at great haste and sold for as little as £400 each. Modern first–time buyers can only dream: that is equivalent to just £20,000 in today's money."

(Telegraph Media Group Limited, 26 Sep 2006)

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1920s1973 • advertising bumf • Baker Street • Benjamin Baker • Boyle Lawrence • British Empire Exhibition • Buckinghamshire • Charles Voysey • commuter belt • countryside • Edward Watkin • electrolier • Eric Sims • first-time buyers • Harrow Hill • Henry Thraile • Hertfordshireidylinterwar period • John Betjeman • Len Rawle • London Transport • meadowland • Metro-Land • Metropolitan Line • Middlesex • modernist architecture • Norman Shaw • north Londoners • nostalgic tributeopen countryside • Palace of Arts • periurbanisation • railway • rural paradise • rural social change • semi-detached housing • social history • suburban sprawl • suburbanisationThe Metropolitan Tower • Tudor cottage • tv documentaryurban sprawl • Watkins Folly • Wembley Stadium • Willesden

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 NOVEMBER 2011

Jonathan Meades: Reading Stowe Gardens

"Stowe Park, a story filled with stories, is, says Meades, 'an anthology of boasts.' Take, for example, the temples of Ancient Virtues, British Worthies and Modern Virtues. Set in the Elysian Fields, reflected in the waters of the River Styx, they are Cobham's version of the good, the great and the downright bad: old heroes in the first, modern heroes in the second and everything that is rubbish about eighteenth century today signifed by the ruins of the third, and by a headless statue of none other than his arch enemy, Walpole. It is a big old Whig boast, and hilariously obvious. Obvious, that is, if you're a member of the Kit Cat Club , or someone with enough of a reading in the classics, in British history, in Cobhams Machiovelian shenanigons. Otherwise, like most of us, you'll be needing that there guide book."

(26 October 2011, FreeState)

Abroad Again: Season 1, Episode 5, Stowe: Reading a Garden (6 June 2007) [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1180365/].

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18th century2007 • architectural folly • aristocracyboasting • classical ideals • classical virtues • decorationdesign formalism • enclosed world • English garden • English landscape garden • English landscape movement • English landscape park • Enlightenment landscapes • European Enlightenment • follies • formal design • gardengarden design • garden follies • garden ornaments • gardening style • ha-ha • ha-ha wall • historical era • historical recreationidealismidyl • idyllic pastoral landscape • James Gibbs • Jardin anglais • John Soane • John Vanbrugh • Jonathan Meades • landscape architect • landscape architecture • landscape garden • ornamental design • pastoral landscape • picturesque • picturesque architecture • planting • reading a garden • Reading A Garden (2007) • Robert Adam • Robert Payton • Stowe Gardens • Stowe House • Stowe School • sublimesymmetrical patterntelevision documentarytheme parkUKview of naturevisual symbolism • Whigs • William Kent

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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