Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Technology' keyword pg.1 of 56
28 OCTOBER 2014

Questioning the goal of efficiency in contemporary culture

"Efficiency in human behavior is a goal that is rarely questioned in contemporary culture. This course will study and draw connections between disparate fields to trace the development and influence of this view. The course, drawing a mix of humanities and engineering students, will include readings and lectures on 19th and 20th century philosophers with discussions of new technology and team experimental projects.

Frederick Taylor, the father of industrial engineering, analyzed human motion to optimize industrial productivity, which had great influence on Henry Ford, military logistics, and Stalin. Michel Foucault traced the history of the minute analysis of human motion from Napoleon's methods for transforming peasants into soldiers to modern methods for reforming prisoners. Martin Heidegger claimed that 'efficient ordering' was the defining characteristic of modern culture. Through the course, students will learn to recognize how this obsession with efficiency for its own sake relates to technology and to their daily lives."

(Questioning Efficiency: Human Factors and Existential Phenomenology, UC Berkeley course syllabus, Fall 2006)

1

2

3

4

5

TAGS

Albert Borgmann • Anson Rabinbach • Anton BragagliaBerkeley (University of California)capture a moment of timechronophotographycooking in the kitchen • critique of technology • Dale Huchingson • dematerialization of objects in space • Eadweard Muybridgeefficiency • efficient ordering • Eliot Eliofson • Emily Fox • engineering students • Etienne-Jules Marey • everyday life • existential phenomenology • fotodinamismo • Frank Gilbreth • Frederick Taylor • geometric chronophotograph • goal • golfer • Henri BergsonHenry Ford • homemaker • Hubert Dreyfushuman behaviourhuman bodyhuman factorshuman factors in designhuman motion • Idris Khan • increased productivityindustrial engineering • industrial productivity • infinite continuity of time • James Gleick • Joseph Stalin • Ken Goldberg • kitchen • kitchen studies • lecture programmeLillian Gilbrethlong exposure • management science • Marcel DuchampMartin Heideggermeasure performancemetricisationmetricsMichel Foucault • military logistics • model kitchen • modern culture • modern homemaker • motion studiesNapoleon Bonaparte • Nude Descending a Staircase (1912) • objects in motion • obsession with efficiency • philosophy of technologyproductivity • reconstruction of movement • schematic phases • scientific goalssimultaneityslow motion photographystudying motiontechnologyThe Kitchen Practical (1929) • time and motion studies • time savingtime-motion studies • Umberto Boccioni • wasted motion

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 DECEMBER 2013

User interaction using the Leap Motion Controller

"The Leap Motion Controller senses how you naturally move your hands and lets you use your computer in a whole new way. Point, wave, reach, grab. Pick something up and move it."

(Leap Motion, Inc)

1
2

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 JUNE 2013

The British Interactive Media Association

"British Interactive Media Company (BIMA) is the industry association representing the interactive media and digital content sector. It supports individuals and organizations which deliver high quality, creative and innovative, interactive media solutions. It strives to stimulate commercial growth, and acts as an industry liaison with academia and government through the provision of knowledge, encouragement and economy; BIMA is a united voice for its members and strives to develop an internationally competitive new media industry in Britain."

(CrunchBase)

1

TAGS

1985 • BIMA • Britain • British Interactive Media Association • creative industriescreative mediacreative media industriesdesign associationdesign professiondesign professionalsdesign sector • digital content sector • digital industries • digital technology • Henry Carroll • industry association • industry liaison • interactive media • interactive media solutions • knowledge-based economymembership • new media industry • professional association for designprofessional bodytechnologyUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 MAY 2013

HandBrake: open-source video transcoder

"HandBrake is an open–source, GPL–licensed, multiplatform, multithreaded video transcoder, available for MacOS X, Linux and Windows. Convert from many common multimedia file formats, including unprotected DVD or BluRay sources to a handful of modern output file formats."

1

TAGS

2003 • batch encoding • batch processing • blu-ray • CODECcompression • decombing • deinterlacing • detelecine • DVDencoderencoding • encoding engine • Eric Petit • file conversion processfile formatGPLH.264 • HandBrake (software) • media formatmedia technology • MediaFork • multiplatform • multithreading • open sourceopen source software • scaling • softwareSourceForgesubtitletechnology • titer • tool • transcode • transcodingvideo encodingvideo mediavideo processingvideo software • video transcoder

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 FEBRUARY 2013

Media technology convergence: from Desktop to mobile

"When that Apple II came out, it really could do nothing. It could show text and after we waited a bit, we had these things called images. Remember when images were first possible with a computer, those gorgeous, full–color images? And then after a few years, we got CD–quality sound. It was incredible. You could listen to sound on the computer. And then movies, via CD–ROM. It was amazing. Remember that excitement? And then the browser appeared. The browser was great, but the browser was very primitive, very narrow bandwidth. Text first, then images, we waited, CD–quality sound over the Net, then movies over the Internet. Kind of incredible. And then the mobile phone occurred, text, images, audio, video. And now we have iPhone, iPad, Android, with text, video, audio, etc. You see this little pattern here? We're kind of stuck in a loop"

(John Maeda, TEDGlobal 2012)

1
2

CONTRIBUTOR

Alise Piebalga
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.