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Which clippings match 'Technoculture' keyword pg.1 of 1
02 FEBRUARY 2016

After Accelerationism: The Xenofeminist Manifesto

"Xenofeminism is gender-abolitionist...Let a hundred sexes bloom! ...[And, let's] construct a society where traits currently assembled under the rubric of gender, no longer furnish a grid for the asymmetric operation of power… You're not exploited or oppressed because you are a wage labourer or poor; you are a labourer or poor because you are exploited..."

(The Laboria Cuboniks collective, 11 June 2015, &&& Journal)

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TAGS

2015 • accelerationism • alien future • alienationalternative visions • aporias of difference • artificial wombs • becomingbody politicsbrave new world • class exclusion • counterculturecritical reinterpretationcyberfeminismdehumanisationdystopian futureearly 21st century • emancipatory potential of technology • exclusionfeminism • foundationalism • freedom from • freedom to • futuristic visiongender politics • gender-abolitionist • groundless universalism • human sexual experience • identity politicsImmanuel Kant • Laboria Cuboniks (collective) • liminalitymanifestomathematical abstractionmeaning-contextsmediated representationmutant sciencenetwork society • Nicolas Bourbaki • nodes of collective agreement • objective realityporous boundaries • prometheanism • protean ambition • race exclusion • radical recomposition • rationalityreterritorialisationselfhood • sexes • state of alienation • synthetic hormones • techno-utopiatechnoculture • technological alienation • transect • transfeminist perspective • transfeminist political project • transgender • transits • transmodernity • transtemporal • visions of the future • xenofeminism • xenofeminist • xenofeminist manifesto • XFM

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 APRIL 2009

Patricia Piccinini: bioscientific practices of manipulation and alteration of living beings

"Most of Piccinini's works are premised on bioscientific practices of manipulation and alteration of living beings, of creating 'new worlds' if 'only' in art. Stem cell research, genetic engineering, cloning, bioelectronics, and technologically mediated ecological restoration and kin formation loom large. Reorienting the arrow of time, both Still Life and Young Family provoke the onto–ethical question of care for the intra– and inter–acting generations that is not asked often enough in technoculture, especially not about its own progenitors and offspring. The important question is not found in the false opposition of nature and technology. Rather what matters is who and what lives and dies, where, when, and how? What is wild, and what quiet? What is the heritage for which technocultural beings are both accountable and indebted? What must the practices of love look like in this tangled wild/quiet country?"

(Donna Haraway)

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TAGS

abjectAustralian artistbio-ethicsbioelectronics • biomedical ethics • biopolitics • bioscience • biotechnology cloning • cloningcritiqueDonna Haraway • ecological restoration • ethicsgenetic engineeringPatricia Piccininiresponsibilitysciencespeculative biology • stem cell • Still Life with Stem Cells (2002) • technocultureThe Young Family (2002)visceralwomen artists

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 MAY 2007

The Laptop Studio: mobile individualisation of technologically-rendered space

"Like the walkman and the mp3 player, the laptop raises a set of questions regarding the folding of spatialities as they intertwine with new cultural practices. For instance, consideration of the interface between space and the everyday routines of laptop users raises a number of issues about the personal uses of mobile devices. On the one hand, ... the laptop is insinuated into the mobile individualisation of technologically–rendered space. It becomes a 'bubble' organised around a privatised desire for withdrawal – a kind of utopic hike into introspective technoculture. Here, the laptop becomes a dwelling, shelter or boundary. It separates the inside from the outside and functions as a nest through which creative output is hatched and nurtured, transposing the personal and affective relationship musicians have with music into an inner technological space rendered by Graphic User Interfaces, projects and folders. In many ways, this echoes the way the traditional recording studio seals itself from the outside world, both acoustically and creatively. As the French sociologist, Antoine Hennion argues, removed from the real world by sound proofing, the studio becomes an 'idealized microcosm of creation' (1989: 408) in which trial and error testing and sonic experimentation takes place".
(Nick Prior)

Hennion, A. (1989) "An Intermediary Between Production and Consumption: The Producer of Popular Music", Science, Technology and Human Values, 14, 4: 400–424.

'OK Computer: Mobility, Software and the Laptop Musician', Information, Communication and Society, 11:7, October 2008: 912–932.

Fig.1 'Clint (KA7OEI) and Randy (KG7GI) on the edge of a 1200 foot cliff overlooking much of Canyonlands National Park, using their laptop computers on the CanyonLan'

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TAGS

Antoine Hennion • cultural practiceexperimentationindividualisationintrospective technoculturelaptop • laptop musician • microcosmmobile devicemobilitymp3musicmusician • Nick Prior • OK Computer • Sony Walkmantechnoculturetechnologically-rendered spaceutopic
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