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17 MARCH 2014

The Pandora Music Genome Project

"We believe that each individual has a unique relationship with music–no one else has tastes exactly like yours. So delivering a great radio experience to each and every listener requires an incredibly broad and deep understanding of music. That's why Pandora is based on the Music Genome Project, the most sophisticated taxonomy of musical information ever collected. It represents over ten years of analysis by our trained team of musicologists, and spans everything from this past Tuesday's new releases all the way back to the Renaissance and Classical music.

Each song in the Music Genome Project is analyzed using up to 450 distinct musical characteristics by a trained music analyst. These attributes capture not only the musical identity of a song, but also the many significant qualities that are relevant to understanding the musical preferences of listeners. The typical music analyst working on the Music Genome Project has a four–year degree in music theory, composition or performance, has passed through a selective screening process and has completed intensive training in the Music Genome's rigorous and precise methodology. To qualify for the work, analysts must have a firm grounding in music theory, including familiarity with a wide range of styles and sounds.

The Music Genome Project's database is built using a methodology that includes the use of precisely defined terminology, a consistent frame of reference, redundant analysis, and ongoing quality control to ensure that data integrity remains reliably high. Pandora does not use machine–listening or other forms of automated data extraction.

The Music Genome Project is updated on a continual basis with the latest releases, emerging artists, and an ever–deepening collection of catalogue titles.

By utilizing the wealth of musicological information stored in the Music Genome Project, Pandora recognizes and responds to each individual's tastes. The result is a much more personalized radio experience – stations that play music you'll love – and nothing else."

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TAGS

analysing dataappeal • attributes • automated data extraction • characteristicsdata analysisdata gathering instruments • data integrity • databasedescriptive labels • ersonalised radio experience • frame of reference • individual preference • individual taste • internet radio • listener preference • machine-listening • metricsmusic • music analyst • Music Genome Project • music taste • music theory • musical characteristicsmusical identitymusical information • musical preferences • musicological information • musicologist • Pandora Radiopersonal taste • precisely terminology • qualities • quality control • radio • radio experience • redundant analysis • relatednesssegmentationsongtaste (sociology)taxonomy • unique taste • user behavioursuser segmentation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 APRIL 2012

JISC Final Report: Enhancing the VADS Image Collection

"The project had three overarching aims: to improve image searching and retrieval; to enable VADS images to be accessed more easily; and to facilitate increased use of the collection by academics. To achieve this, the project has developed OAI–PMH capabilities on the VADS database; developed and applied a general top level hierarchical taxonomy to the VADS collections; implemented a combination of controlled terms and free to edit user tags; and enabled academic users to create, annotate and publish their own image sets. "

(Amy Robinson, August 2009, p.4)

Fig.1 French photographer, JR.

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TAGS

2009 • academic users • academicsannotationcollections • controlled terms • databasedigitisation • easy access • enhancing the VADS • folksonomy • free to edit user tags • funded project • hierarchical taxonomy • image annotation • image collectionimage database • image publishing • image retrieval • image searchingimage setsJISCOAI-PMHonline collectionsearchsearch and retrievaltaxonomy • user tags • VADS • VADS database

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 JUNE 2011

The UK Joint Academic Coding System (JACS)

"The Joint Academic Coding System (JACS) is owned and maintained by the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) and the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) and is used for subject coding of provision across higher education in the UK. JACS was first introduced in 2002/03 (UCAS year of entry 2002 and reporting year 2002/03 HESA) to replace the two different classifications systems previously used by the two organisations. JACS is currently used to code the subjects of both higher education courses and the individual modules within them across the full range of higher education provision.

Since the range and depth of subjects available for study in higher education is not static, it is necessary to review JACS on a regular basis to ensure that it is current and up to date. A first review of a subset of subject areas resulted in JACS 2.0 introduced for 2007 year of entry (UCAS) and 2007/08 reporting year (HESA).

A second review of JACS has just been completed, leading to the production of JACS 3.0 for use from 2012/13 (UCAS year of entry 2012). The intention of this review was to understand any new developments in the identified areas that may not have been reflected in the JACS 2.0 classification and/or to identify anything that was otherwise missing or incorrectly classified.

A number of subject areas were identified as needing review. It was also intended that particular attention be paid to ensuring that JACS was suitable for coding foundation degree provision. Investigation was also undertaken as part of this review to see whether or not JACS could also be used for classification of research."

(Universities and Colleges Admissions Service, UK)

1). Owen Stephens JISC MOSAIC JACS extraction utility: W614, 2011

TAGS

200220032007200820122013classification • classifications systems • code • foundation degree • HESAhigher educationHigher Education Statistics AgencyJACS • JACS 2.0 • JACS 3 • JACS 3.0 • Joint Academic Coding Systemprogramme modules • subject areas • subject coding • taxonomyUCASUKUniversities and Colleges Admissions Service

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 MAY 2011

Connected Histories: digital resources of early modern and 19th century Britain

"Connected Histories brings together a range of digital resources related to early modern and nineteenth century Britain with a single federated search that allows sophisticated searching of names, places and dates, as well as the ability to save, connect and share resources within a personal workspace."

(University of Hertfordshire, University of London, University of Sheffield, 2011)

Fig.1 "The photograph shows the beach at Cromer in Norfolk, which features in Emma (1816) as 'The best of all the sea–bathing places'. A small fishing village then, noted for its crabs, by 1887 the railway had arrived. The pier (which still stands) was built in 1901." Martin (Manuscripts Cataloguer), Caird Library

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TAGS

19th century2011Bodleian LibraryBritainBritish history • British Origins • Connected Histories • conservationcultural heritagecultural representationsdigital heritagedigital resourcesdigitisationearly modern periodEconomic and Social Research Council • eContent • everyday lifefamily historygenealogy • Higher Education Digitisation Service • history • HRI Online Publications • Humanities Research Institute • ICT • Irish Origins • JISC • John Johnson Collection • John Strype • Leverhulme Trust • London Lives • manuscriptmapsmuseologynational cultural heritage online • National Wills Index • nineteenth century • Origins.net • personal workspace • plates • preservation • printed ephemera • ProQuest • Scots Origins • searchsearch toolshare resources • Stuart London • taxonomyUKUniversity of HertfordshireUniversity of LondonUniversity of NottinghamUniversity of Sheffield

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 MAY 2010

A naïve ontology for concepts of time and space for searching and learning

"User–oriented digital information search environments call for flexible information access interfaces that may interact with a dynamically changing searcher view in capturing a variety of media. Optimal use of conventional libraries and bibliographic databases requires a general understanding of the knowledge structure of the collection domain (Hsieh–Yee 1993; Pennanen & Vakkari 2003). Novice searchers without such understanding, however, can seek the help of librarians and intermediaries when they get lost in search processes.

Increasing numbers of digital libraries and online resources on the Internet provide potential users with opportunities to access and interact with these resources directly from offices and homes. Such trends seem to offer searchers useful information access environments for a variety of information resources. However, in such environments, novice searchers are forced to seek the information they need without the help of librarians or other intermediaries. In reality, many novice users of digital libraries do not have a general understanding of the knowledge structure of the digital collections held by these libraries. Eventually they may give up pursuing their information needs when they get lost during search processes or obtain unsatisfactory search results.

This research project seeks to find a way to overcome such limitations of existing information access interfaces developed for traditional libraries and bibliographic information services. Specifically, we explore a qualitative research method for eliciting the knowledge structure of novice searchers and patterns of its modification in their search and learn processes, and build on it a naïve ontology for time and space."

(Makiko Miwa & Noriko Kando, 2007)

Hsieh–Yee, I. (1993). Effects of search experience and subject knowledge on the search tactics of novice and experienced searchers. Journal of the American Society for Information Science, 27(3), 117–120.

Miwa, M. and Kando, N. (2007). "A naïve ontology for concepts of time and space for searching and learning" Information Research, 12(2), paper 296 [Available at http://InformationR.net/ir/12–2/paper296.html]

Pennanen, M. & Vakkari, P. (2003). Students' conceptual structure, search process and outcome while preparing a research proposal. Journal of the American Society for Information Science, 54(8), 759–770.

TAGS

2007access • bibliographic databases • bibliographycollectiondigital informationdigital librarydomain expertsflexibilityICTinformation access • information access interfaces • information in contextinformation servicesinteractionInternet • knowledge structure • library • naive ontology • novice • online resourcesontologyorderingpatternrepositoryresourcessearch • search environments • searchertaxonomyusabilityuser • user-oriented

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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