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26 SEPTEMBER 2013

The Public: the gallery for the future to close

"When designs for The Public were first put forward in 1994, the gallery was intended to revitalise the community. Some residents, however, saw the building as an extravagance and a waste of money. Criticism steadily grew as the project ran into difficulties, with debts rising and funding falling short. The venue had to be rescued on more than one occasion by government grants or Arts Council funding. Earlier this week Mr Cooper described the arts centre as a 'giant shoe box' and said it should not have been built when it was by previous council leaders in his Labour group. He said he had always had doubts privately about the building. Since The Public opened, however, visitor numbers have steadily grown for theatre, music and comedy performances, as well as exhibitions."

(BBC News, 9 August 2013)

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TAGS

1994art centres • arts centre • Arts Council Englandboxcommunity engagement • creative place • electronic art • entertainment venue • everyday cultureinteractive electronic artworkinteractive media art • learning hub • Linda Saunders • media artmuseummuseum of contemporary culturenew media artpostmodern architecturepostmodern designpublic galleryregistered charity • Sandwell Arts Trust • Sandwell Council • technology-based art • The Public (arts centre) • UKvenue • West Bromwich

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 JANUARY 2013

The Museum of Contemporary Native Arts

"The Museum of Contemporary Native Arts is the country's [USA] leading museum for exhibiting, collecting and interpreting the most progressive work of contemporary Native artists for local, national and international audiences. MoCNA is a venue for exhibitions of artists who merit, local, national and international recognition. The Museum belongs at the forefront of contemporary Native art presentation and strives to be flexible, foresighted and risk–taking in its exhibitions and programs."

(MoCNA)

Richard Glazer–Danay, Jan, 2012, "Shake, Rattle & Roll", Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, [http://www.iaia.edu/museum/exhibition/shake–rattle–roll/].

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1962 • American Indian • art museumartworkscontemporary art • contemporary Native artists • cultural appropriation • cultural discourse • cultural identitycultural interpretations • cultural programme • exhibiting artists • folk museumfostering discourse • IAIA • indigenous artIndigenous people • Institute of American Indian Arts • international audiences • MoCNA • museummuseum of contemporary culture • Museum of Contemporary Native Arts • National Collection of Contemporary Native Art • national cultural identitiesNative Americans • Native art • Native artists • New Mexico • North America • progressive work • sacred • Santa Fe

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JANUARY 2010

Rongomaraeroa: contemporary design to tell traditional stories

"Rongomaraeroa, Te Papa's Marae, is the creation of master carver Cliff Whiting and the Māori advisory group to Te Papa, Ngā Kaiwawao, who came up with the concept to develop a fully functional marae, which would embrace the concept of mana taonga and the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi. The official opening was on 30 November 1997. ...

New Zealand's other cultures are represented along the back wall of the meeting house, and the changing relationship between Māori and Pākehā is portrayed inside the cupboards housed in the poutokomanawa (the central heart post of the meeting house)."

(Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa)

[A contemporary design built upon traditional cultural values.]

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1997Aotearoa New Zealandcarving • Cliff Whiting • community • contemporary • craftcultural valuesdesign artefactidentityIndigenousMaorimaraeMDF • meeting house • museummuseum of contemporary cultureMuseum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa • Nga Kaiwawao • Pakeha • poutokomanawa • Rongomaraeroa • storyTe Papa TongarewaTe Tiriti o Waitangitradition • traditional stories • Treaty of WaitangitribeWellington • wharenui • wood

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 SEPTEMBER 2008

Urbis: capturing visitors through CCTV surveillance

"These themes are reflected in the variety of interactive exhibits on display, the centre piece of which is a room containing cctv cameras where one can see oneself being filmed and where, at a console, one can then produce one's identity card, with basic information about oneself, including likes and dislikes. These can then be stuck on the outside wall of the room and can be read by other visitors. This appears to be one of the most popular exhibits and an example of an interactive display that works. The reason for this success are that it affords absorption or immersion in an activity in ways that most of the other exhibits do not. It makes no sense here just to look, rather one needs to sit down and get involved in a hands on experience so that one can present a snapshot of oneself to others. There is often a queue to use the computers and after a year the wall outside for sticking the id cards on is filling up. Information on the id cards includes a photo taken by the cctv cameras, first name, place of residence and likes and dislikes, these mostly include foods, football teams, family members, pets and celebrities often in both categories."

(Kevin Hetherington, 2004 p.23)

Hetherington, Kevin. 1997 "The Badlands of Modernity: Heterotopia and Social Ordering", London, UK: Routledge.

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TAGS

big brotherCCTVdecal • identity cards • interactive exhibitKevin HetheringtonManchester • Millennium Quarter Trust • museummuseum of contemporary culture • photo id • photo identification • photoboothpublic gallerystickersurveillancetoyUK • Urbis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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