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Which clippings match 'Cultural Interpretations' keyword pg.1 of 1
10 FEBRUARY 2013

第29届北京奥运会开幕式 (Beijing Olympics Opening Ceremony)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Guannan (cassie) Du
05 JANUARY 2013

The Museum of Contemporary Native Arts

"The Museum of Contemporary Native Arts is the country's [USA] leading museum for exhibiting, collecting and interpreting the most progressive work of contemporary Native artists for local, national and international audiences. MoCNA is a venue for exhibitions of artists who merit, local, national and international recognition. The Museum belongs at the forefront of contemporary Native art presentation and strives to be flexible, foresighted and risk–taking in its exhibitions and programs."

(MoCNA)

Richard Glazer–Danay, Jan, 2012, "Shake, Rattle & Roll", Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, [http://www.iaia.edu/museum/exhibition/shake–rattle–roll/].

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TAGS

1962 • American Indian • art museumartworkscontemporary art • contemporary Native artists • cultural appropriation • cultural discourse • cultural identitycultural interpretations • cultural programme • exhibiting artists • folk museumfostering discourse • IAIA • indigenous artIndigenous people • Institute of American Indian Arts • international audiences • MoCNA • museummuseum of contemporary culture • Museum of Contemporary Native Arts • National Collection of Contemporary Native Art • national cultural identitiesNative Americans • Native art • Native artists • New Mexico • North America • progressive work • sacred • Santa Fe

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 AUGUST 2006

Musee du Quai Branly: showcasing spoils of a colonial past

"Pendentif Hei Tiki – Le tiki est un motif lié à la figuration humaine et la term heib signifie.

'pendant'. Les hei tiki pouvaient être portés par les hommes et les femmes maoris et se tranmettaient au fil des générations.
Début du 19e siècle, jade, fibres végétales, os"
(Musée du quai Branly, Paris)

[Musee du Quai Branly is a new museum in Paris showcasing indigenous artefacts obtained during France's colonial period. The museum attempts to draw connections between its represented cultures through evoking narratives of difference and progress. Despite this somewhat naïve ethnographic stance the museum goes someway towards representing the vastness and diversity of indigenous knowledge.]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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