Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Blade Runner (1982)' keyword pg.1 of 2
20 NOVEMBER 2016

Alex Gendler: how to recognize a dystopia

"The genre of dystopia – the 'not good place'– has captured the imaginations of artists and audiences alike for centuries. But why do we bother with all this pessimism? Alex Gendler explains how dystopias act as cautionary tales – not about some particular government or technology, but the very idea that humanity can be molded into an ideal shape."

1

TAGS

Aldous Huxley • Alex Gendler • Animal Farm (1954)artificial intelligence • aryan • atomic energyBlade Runner (1982)brave new world • Brave New World (1932) • cautionary talecommunist systemconcentration campdemocracydepletion of natural resourcesDr Strangelove (1964) • drudgery • dystopia • dystopian fiction • dystopian literature • dystopian science fictioneugenicsfactory workerfascismfree willgas chambergenetic engineering • Gullivers Travels (1726) • H G Wells • humanitys future • impoverished masses • impoverishment • industrial ageindustrial revolution • industrial warfare • It Cant Happen Here (1935) • Jack London • Jonathan Swift • mass entertainment • mass media ageMetropolis (1927) • modern anxieties • nightmare world • Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949)nuclear war • oligarchy • oppressionoverpopulationparadise • perfect world • political structures • povertyprogress narratives • resource depletion • science fiction • Sinclair Lewis • slumsocial rolessocial structures • space colony • space travelspeculative fiction • squalor • surveillance state • TED-Ed • The Handmaids Tale (1985) • The Iron Heel (1908) • The RepublicThe Time MachineThomas Moretotalitarianism • tyrannical oligarchy • tyranny of modernismutopia • V for Vendetta (2006) • Watchmen (2009) • We (1924) • Westworld (1973) • WW1WWII • Yevgeny Zamyatin

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 AUGUST 2013

8mm behind-the-scenes home movie Making 'Dune' by Sean Young

"Dune, the motion picture was made in Mexico City, Mexico during the spring of 1983. Drafted by director David Lynch, Sean Young arrived on the set of Dune with her Super 8 camera in tow to shoot this documentary. Fresh off of Ridley Scott's Blade Runner, Young joined the cast of Lynch's big–budget adaptation of Frank Herbert's Dune, one of the most ambitious science fiction tales in all of pop culture. Produced by Dino De Laurentiis, Dune cost about $45 million to make and earned only about half of it back. But you'd never know Dune would become such a notorious film by watching the smiles on everyone involved."

1
2

TAGS

19838mmbehind-the-scenesBlade Runner (1982) • Brad Dourif • David Lynch • Dino De Laurentiis • Dune (1983) • Frank Herbert • home movieKyle MacLachlanmaking ofMax von SydowMexicoMexico Citymotion picture • Patrick Stewart • Ridley Scottscience fiction • Sean Young • Sting • Super 8 movie camera

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 NOVEMBER 2012

Max Headroom: an anarchic and irreverent cybernetic protagonist

"Max Headroom was one of the most innovative science fiction series ever produced for American television, an ambitious attempt to build upon the cyberpunk movement in science fiction literature. The character of Max Headroom, the series's unlikely cybernetic protagonist, was originally introduced in a 1984 British television movie, produced by Peter Wagg, and starring Canadian actor Matt Frewer. ABC brought the series to American television in March 1987, refilming the original movie as a pilot but recasting most of the secondary roles. The ABC series attracted critical acclaim and a cult following, but only lasted for fourteen episodes. The anarchic and irreverent Max went on to become an advertising spokesman for Coca–Cola and to host his own talk show on the Cinemax cable network."

(The Museum of Broadcast Communications)

1

TAGS

1980s198780s television • American television • anarchicBlade Runner (1982)Bruce SterlingCoca-Colacomputer animation • cult following • cyberneticcyberpunk • cyberpunk movement • cyberspace • irreverent • Matt Frewer • Max Headroom • Museum of Broadcast CommunicationsNeuromancer • Pat Cadigan • Peter Wagg • Rudy Ruckerscience fiction literaturescience fiction television series • telefilm • televisiontelevision series • The Road Warrior • TVWilliam Gibson

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 OCTOBER 2012

Loom: Blade Runner style 4K short film by Luke Scott

"He is an acclaimed commercial director who has pushed through his work to step out of the shadow of his father, Ridley Scott. And now Luke Scott is transcending boundaries in video technology with a visually–arresting 20–minute short film, Loom. Shot in coordination with RED Camera, the sci–fi short features Giovanni Ribisi and Jellybean Howie, although cinematographer Dariusz Wolski just might be its star.

The film follows Ribisi's character Tommy – a lab tech who genetically modifies meat and begins a dangerous at–home experiment he struggles to perfect. It ends with a monologue taken from the conclusion of Darwin's Origin of Species, leaving many of the story's questions left unanswered. 'There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved,' says Howie's character.

Visually, Scott – who directs for his father's production company RSA – gives nod to the filmmaker's 1982 classic Blade Runner, shooting the piece in the tone and style of the dystopian thriller. Constructed for 3D, the piece was crafted to test the limits of the colour range and exposure, allowing viewers to see fine details often lost in dark scenes.

RED initially presented Loom at the 2012 National Association of Broadcasters [NAB] Show this past April. The company has since continued to screen the film, and on Wednesday President Jarred Land released it online via REDUSER, with a disclaimer for cinephiles."

(Jennifer Madison, 31 August 2012, Mail Online)

Fig. 1 published on 28 Aug 2012 by ENTV, YouTube

1

TAGS

20124K • 4K 3D • 4K projection • bio-ethicsbiotechnologyBlade Runner (1982)Charles Darwincinematographycolour • colour range • commercials director • cultured meat • Dariusz Wolski • diseasedystopian future • dystopian thriller • Epic RED • film exposure • fine detail • genetic manipulation • genetically modified meat • genetics • Giovanni Ribisi • HDin vitro meat • Jellybean Howie • lab tech • laser projector • loom • Loom (film) • Los Angeles Short Fest • Luke Scott • mutant science • NAB (acronym) • National Association of Broadcasters • Origin of Species • RED Camera • RED ONE • REDUSER • Ridley Scott • RSA (production company) • sci-fisci-fi short filmscience-fiction • shmeat • short filmvideo technologyvisual spectacle

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 FEBRUARY 2010

Moebius Redux: A Life in Pictures

"Jean Giraud achieved worldwide recognition not only for his comic book work – often under the pseudonym Moebius – but also for his artistic input into a host of hit films, including: Tron, The Fifth Element, Space Jam and Alien.

Winner of Best Documentary and Best Picture at San Diego ComiCon!, Moebius Redux features Marvel Comics legend Stan Lee and American comic book artists Jim Lee (X–Men) and Mike Mignola (Hellboy), as well as Alejandro Jodorowsky and Dan OBannon (Alien), discussing the breathtaking work of a true visionary."

(Sky Arts)

1

TAGS

2007aestheticsAlejandro Jodorowskyalienart directionBlade Runner (1982)comic bookcomic book artcomic book artist • Dan O'Bannon • designdrawingfictionFrench cartoonistgraphic novelgraphicsHeavy Metal (magazine) • Hellboy • illustrationJean GiraudJim LeeMarvel Comics • Mike Mignola • Moebius (pseudonym)Ridley Scottscience fictionsketch • Space Jam • Stan LeeThe Fifth Element (1997) • The Long Tomorrow • Tronvisual communicationvisual design • X-Men

CONTRIBUTOR

David Valente
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.