Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'George Bernard Shaw' keyword pg.1 of 1
04 MAY 2015

Beyond Bloomsbury: Designs of the Omega Workshops 1913-19

"Established in 1913 by the painter and influential art critic Roger Fry, the Omega Workshops were an experimental design collective, whose members included Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant and other artists of the Bloomsbury Group.

Well ahead of their time, the Omega Workshops brought the experimental language of avant-garde art to domestic design in Edwardian Britain. They were a laboratory of design ideas, creating a range of objects for the home, from rugs and linens to ceramics, furniture and clothing – all boldly coloured with dynamic abstract patterns. No artist was allowed to sign their work, and everything produced by the Workshops bore only the Greek letter Ω (Omega)."

(The Courtauld Institute of Art)

1

2

TAGS

1913 • 1919 • Alvaro Guevara • art movement • avant-garde art movement • Bloomsbury Group • bold new designs • British designceramicsclothing design • Cuthbert Hamilton • decorative artsdesign collectivedesign history • design of domestic products • Duncan Grant • Edward McKnight Kauffer • Edward Morgan ForsterEdward Wadsworth • Edward Wolfe • Frederick Etchells • furniture designGeorge Bernard Shaw • Gertrude Stein • Henri Gaudier-Brzeska • home furnishingsinterior design • Israel Zangwill • Jesse Etchells • Lady Ian Hamilton • Lady Maud Cunard • Lady Ottoline Morrell • linen design • linocutlithography • Mikhail Larionov • mosaicnew approaches • Nina Hamnett • Omega artists • Omega Workshops • painted furniture • painted murals • painted silks and linens • Pamela Diamand • Roger Fry • rug • Somerset House • stained glasstablewaretextile design • The Courtauld Institute of Art • upholstery • Vanessa Bell • vibrant abstract design • Virginia WoolfWilliam Butler Yeats • Winifred Gill • woodblock prints • woven wools • Wyndham Lewis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 JANUARY 2013

The Value of Culture: Mass Culture

"Melvyn Bragg considers how technology and increasing access to education made possible the rise of a true mass culture in the twentieth century. He examines how the rise of cinema and photography opened the cultural realms to millions, and how our understanding of what culture is, and what it's for, was transformed by the work of scholars such as Richard Hoggart and Raymond Williams."

(Melvyn Bragg, 2013)

"The Value of Culture: Two Cultures", Radio broadcast, Episode 4 of 5, Duration: 42 minutes, First broadcast: Thursday 03 January 2013, Presenter/Melvyn Bragg, Producer/Thomas Morris for the BBC Radio 4, UK.

1

TAGS

20th centuryaccess to educationAngela McRobbie • Arnold Bennett • art • art and entertainment • cinemacultural diversity • cultural realms • cultural studiescultureculture and society • culture theory • David Puttnam • educated classes • Emile Zola • Englishness • entertainmentEuropean cinemaeveryday cultureF R Leavis • free public education • George Bernard ShawGeorge OrwellGustave FlaubertH G Wells • half-educated • highbrow • imperialism • John Carey • lowbrow • mass civilization • Mass Civilization and Minority Culture • mass culture • mass reading public • mass societymedia technologyMelvyn Bragg • minority culture • modernist intellectuals • overpopulationphotographypop-culture • provincial culture • Raymond Williams • regional cultural • Richard Hoggart • Robert Hewison • science fiction literature • semi-educated • silent cinemaStuart Hall • The Intellectuals and the Masses • The Time Machine • The Uses of Literacy • The Value of Culture (radio)Thomas Stearns Eliot • travel photography • working class culture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.