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Which clippings match 'Association For Computing Machinery' keyword pg.1 of 1
10 FEBRUARY 2013

The Tablet Newspaper: A Vision for the Future in 1994

"The Knight Ridder Information Design Lab is developing a newspaper interface for the tablet device. The tablet newspaper draws on the strengths of print and on the strengths of electronic forms. It is both browsable and searchable, both broad–reaching and customizable. It offers pages with story abstracts linked to more detailed stories, background material, photos, sound, and video. People can ran read as deeply or as casually as they want. Stories are no longer limited to 'news hole,' the space allotted to editorial content after press configurations and advertising have been considered.

The tablet newspaper includes editorial content and advertising, both important components of a local information package. Like editorial content, advertising can have many layers, and can be searched and sorted, as well as browsed. Additionally, ads can have transaction hooks, so that readers can make reservations or purchases."

(Teresa Martin, 1995, CHI Conference Proceedings [http://www.sigchi.org/chi95/])

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TAGS

1994ACM • Apple Newton • Association for Computing Machinery • browsable • digital eradigital media • digital paper • digital readingdigital technologyelectronic formselectronic newspaperelectronic publishingfuture of the book • information interface • ink-on-paper • interface design • Knight-Ridder Information Design Lab • layout designlook and feelnew technologiesnewspaperpage layoutPDApersonal computerpersonal digital assistantremediation • Roger Fidler • speculative researchtablettablet interface • tablet newspaper • tablet publishingtechnology convergencetechnology innovation • textual information • the future of the book • vertical orientation • visual clues

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 MARCH 2009

Information Architecture: understanding in the age of also

"Richard Saul Wurman, author and founder of the celebrated TED conferences, describes himself as an 'information architect,' a term that he defines as 'the individual who organizes the patterns inherent in data, making the complex clear. It's a person who creates the structure or map of information which allows others to find their personal paths to knowledge, and it's also the name of the emerging 21st century professional occupation which addresses the needs of an age, focused upon clarity, human understanding and the science of the organization of information.'"

(Ubiquity, ACM)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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