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22 JULY 2015

Pinscreen animation Mindscape by Jacques Drouin

"A particularly creative example of the pinscreen animation technique, this film is about an artist who steps inside his painting and wanders about in a landscape peopled with symbols that trigger unexpected associations. Film without words."

"Mindscape" by Jacques Drouin, 1976, 7mins 31s.

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1976animated short filmanimation techniqueblack and whiteboundary-crossing • crossing over • dreamlike storytelling • grey • in the mind • Jacques Drouin • landscape painting • Le paysagiste (1976) • meta-painting • Mindscape (1976) • movable pins • National Film Board of Canadapaint our own surroundingspainted world • picture within a picture • pinscreen animation technique • reality and illusion • shades of grey • stepping out of the framesurrealistic • surrealistic imagery • symbolic meaning • textural effects • without dialogue • wordless

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 JULY 2015

The Phone Box: allegory about the consequences of dehumanisation

"In a bland square in Madrid, some workers, who are wearing a strange uniform, are installing a phone box. Some moments later, an anonymous citizen, after taking his son to the school bus, gets trapped in the box for no understandable reason. As the day goes by, all kind of strangers go there to see the strange event: some of them try to free him; others make fun of him… Everyone looks interested in this little man. After a distressing delay full of surrealistic moments, the trapped man is taken to a strange factory full of thousands of phone boxes. In each one, a single corpse is trapped, in some strange ritual. The movie ends with a new phone box in another square of the city."

(Aaron Rodriguez, World Cinema Directory)

Antonio Mercero (1972). "La Cabina/The Phone Box", -phone booth location: Calle de Rodríguez San Pedro, 5, Madrid, Spain [http://filmap.tumblr.com/post/98879196634/la-cabina-antonio-mercero-1972-phone-booth-calle].

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1972absurd situationsallegory • Antonio Mercero • black tale • caught in a trap • claustrophobic spacescyclical narrativedehumanisation • dehumanised society • distressdisturbing taleenclosed space • entrapment • environment as antagonist • eternal cycle • fait accomplifantasy about deathfeelings of panic • futility • get me the hell out of here • helplessness • high concepthigh concept film • Jose Luis Garci • Jose Luis Lopez Vazquez • La cabina (1972) • macabreMadrid • mummified remains • no escape • phone booth • powerlesspsychological horrorsadisticsarcophagusshort filmSpanish filmspeculative fictionsymbolic meaning • telephone booth • telephone box • The Telephone Box (1972) • tombtrapped • twisted game

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 NOVEMBER 2014

Nuggets: an animation about the downhill slide into drug addiction

"Ein Kiwi bewegt sich entlang einer Ebene. Er entdeckt einen Gold Nugget und kostet. Es ist köstlich.

In knapper und äußerst reduzierter Form mit wenigen Linien und Farben (schwarz–weiß–gelb) und einem starken, sicheren Gefühl für Rhythmus offenbart der Film das Prinzip der Sucht: Er zeigt, wie der Stoff den ganzen Körper erfüllt, zum Abheben bringt und leicht dahin schweben lässt. Er zeigt die harte Landung und den stärker werdenden Drang, das Hochgefühl wiederzuerlangen. Aber die Höhenflüge werden immer kürzer, müssen in immer knapperen Zeitabständen wiederholt werden. Gleichzeitig wird der Aufprall in der Realität immer härter und schmerzvoller. Dabei wird der Körper stärker und stärker in Mitleidenschaft gezogen. Kaum merklich wird der anfangs helle Vogel vor hellem Hintergrund in feinen Schattierungen von Grau immer dunkler, bis der Stoff der Träume ihn schließlich nicht mehr locken kann.

Durch die reduzierten Stilmittel wirkt der Film umso überzeugender. Auf dem schwarz–weißen Hintergrund geht von dem leuchtend gelben, runden Nugget eine sichtbare Versuchung aus. Wer würde ihn nicht probieren wollen? Dabei steht der Nugget nur als Metapher, hinter der sich verschiedene Formen der Sucht verbergen können: Drogen, Erfolg, Reichtum etc. Darüber hinaus könnte man den Film als Sinnbild des Lebens interpretieren, in dessen Verlauf man alles ausschöpfen will, bis unmerklich der Lebensabend naht und alles relativiert.

Ein kurzer Film mit klarer Form und Aussage, der aber dennoch viele Deutungen zulässt."

(Deutsche Film – und Medienbewertung)

Director: Andreas Hykade, Country: Germany, Year: 2014, Length: 5 mins 17 secs.

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20142D animationallegory • Andreas Hykade • Angela Steffen • animated short filmbirdchemical dependency • cycle of addiction • dependence • downhill slide • drug addictiondrug takingdrug user • FFA Berlin • floatingGerman cinema • golden nugget • Heiko Maile • Kiwiline drawing • Nuggets (2014) • physical transformation • Ralf Bohde • repeating patternsubstance abusesubstance dependencesymbolic meaningvector animationvisual metaphoryellow

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 FEBRUARY 2014

Mercator Projection versus the Gall-Peters Projection Maps

Fig.1 West Wing (television) season 2, episode 16, "Somebody's Going to Emergency, Somebody's Going to Jail".

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Arno Peters • cartographic metaphorcartographic representationscartographycultural constructscultural hegemony • cylindrical equal-area projection • equal-area cylindric projection • equal-area map projection • Eurocentric legacy • Gall-Peters Projection Map • geographygraphic representationhistorical narrativeshow we see the worldinformation visualisation • James Gall • map • map design • maps • Mercator Projection Map • metaphors of realityphysical geographypolitics of cartographyprojectionspatial representationspatial symbolismsymbolic meaning • The West Wing (television) • unexamined assumptionsvisual representationworld mapsworld view

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 APRIL 2013

Navimation: Exploring Time, Space & Motion in the Design of Screen Based Interfaces

"Interface design has often been considered a subsection of interaction design (Moggridge, 2007; Löwgren & Stolterman, 2004; Bagnara & Crampton Smith, 2006). In the shift from designing objects to designing experiences, interaction design needs to investigate temporal as well as spatial form (Redström, 2001; Mazé & Redström, 2005), and to see computation as basic material.

From a social, cultural and humanistic perspective, studies of the design of interactions and their contexts of use can be understood in terms of mediated communication and the historical, social, playful and aesthetic in digital design (Blythe, Overbeeke, Monk, & Wright, 2003; Lunenfeld, 1999). This approach has been framed as Communication Design (Morrison et al., in press). This mediational perspective of digital communication is informed by studies in new media, social semiotics, socio–cultural studies of learning and work, and practice–based research into multimodal composition in which mediated discourse itself undergoes change through active use (Jones & Norris, 2005; Morrison, in press). This view is distinct from the structuralist and directional or 'transmission' models of communication (e.g., Crilly, Maier, & Clarkson, 2008) that are not rooted in cultural and mediational theory. From a Communication Design perspective, the interface itself mediates; it is understood as socially and culturally constructed and situated. Such a perspective is not very widely articulated in discussions of the interface in design research. Further, few studies exist of dynamic, digital interfaces and their multimodal characteristics from a specifically media and Communication Design view (e.g., Skjulstad, 2007).

In their design activity, interaction designers invest heavily in the shaping of interfaces as symbolic and cultural texts. Alongside this attention to design, and with reference to user–driven studies, we also need to unpack the features and possible functions of these emerging forms of mediated communication. The proliferation of 'movement in the interface' demands that we pay attention to a variety of media types, genre conventions and earlier media, and to the ways that elements of these are combined in different configurations. Social semiotics provides some means for relating the various graphical, animational and kinetic aspects of dynamic interfaces within a wider communicative perspective.3"

(Jon Olav H. Eikenes and Andrew Morrison, 2010)

Jon Olav H. Eikenes and Andrew Morrison (2010). "Navimation: Exploring Time, Space & Motion in the Design of Screen–based Interfaces", International Journal of Design Vol 4, No 1.

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2010aesthetic experience • Andrew Monk • Andrew Morrison • animational communication • Anja Maier • Bill Moggridge • communication design • computation as material • cultural perspective • cultural texts • design for the screendesign researchdesigning experiencesdesigning objectsdigital communicationdigital design • dynamic digital interfaces • dynamic interfacesemerging digital media • emerging forms • Erik Stolterman • funology • genre conventions • Gillian Crampton Smith • graphical communication • humanistic perspectiveinteraction designinterface designInternational Journal of Design • Johan Redstrom • Jonas Lowgren • Kees Overbeeke • kinetic bodily logos • Mark Blythe • material thinking • media and communication design • media as material objectsmediated communication • mediated discourse • mediated interaction • mediational perspective • mediational theory • movement in the interface • multimodal characteristics • multimodal compositionmultimodal user interfaces • Nathan Crilly • navimation • new media • P John Clarkson • Peter Lunenfeld • Peter Wrigh • playfulnesspractice-based research • Ramia Maze • Rodney Jones • screen-based interface • Sebastiano Bagnara • Sigrid Norris • situated perspective • social perspective • social semiotics • socio-cultural studies of learning • spatial form • spatial ordersymbolic meaning • Synne Skjulstad • temporal form • transmission model of communicationuser-driven

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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