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Which clippings match 'Symbolic Control' keyword pg.1 of 1
22 NOVEMBER 2015

Questioning how we relate to the world in functional ways

"JODI's disruption of mapping and video games reminded me of Situationist artist Guy Debord's calls for a 'renovated cartography.' For Debord, when we blindly follow the same directions over and over, using the easiest paths, we get stuck relating to the world in 'functional' ways and imagination withers. Debord wanted people to use the wrong map in the wrong place — to get lost in order that we might see our surroundings anew. Similarly, JODI strips away the usual instrumental goals of our engagements with digital media — to win a game, to communicate information, to navigate quickly. What we are left with is a bare awareness of the random components of our digital lives and a glimpse at the other possibilities for technology."

(Leila Nadir, 30 April 2012, Museum of the Moving Image)

TAGS

2012agency of access and engagementcartographycontrolled environments • designing for playful engagement • Dirk Paesmansdisruptive interrogation • diversity of engagement • exploratory experimentation • exploring other possibilities for technology • functional purpose • getting lost • Guy Debordinstructions for useinstrumental conception of technologyInternet artJoan HeemskerkJODI (art collective)Museum of the Moving Imageour digital livesperformativity • questioning our uses of technology • relating to the world in functional ways • renovated cartography • rethinking boundaries • scriptible spaces • seeing our surroundings anew • Situationist Internationalsymbolic controlunfolding possibilitiesvideo games

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 NOVEMBER 2013

Confiscation Cabinets: an exhibition of confiscated childhood objects

"Artist Guy Tarrant's display cabinets show artefacts gleaned from 150 different London primary and secondary schools over three decades. These objects include homemade games, keepsakes, cult toys, peculiar adornments, weapons and other forbidden objects which characterise the flotsam and jetsam of contemporary school children.

Since qualifying as a teacher, Guy Tarrant has investigated pupil interaction, play and resistant behaviour. The objects in the cabinets highlight mischievous and distracted behaviour played out in the controlled school setting where children spend much of their time. These confiscated items are evidence of the pupils' playful and impulsive activities and how they may reject or evade rules."

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TAGS

ad-hoc • adornments • artefactsauthoritychildhood imagination • confiscated items • Confiscation Cabinets • confiscation drawer • controlcontrolled environments • cult toys • cultural significance of objectsdiscipline and punishmentdistracting attentiondistracting behaviourDIYfad • flotsam and jetsam • forbidden objects • Guy Tarrant • homemade bombs • homemade gamesimprovisation • impulsive activities • intriguing objects • keepsake • makeshiftmaterial culturemischievous behaviour • Museum of Childhood • personal cultural production • personal objects • plastic toysplayful activitiesprimary schoolpunishmentregulationresistant behaviourrulesschool children • school setting • secondary schoolsocial interactionsubversive actionssymbolic controltoy • toy guns • V and Aweapons

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 AUGUST 2006

Symbolic Control Through Appropriation Of Local Stories

"For socially engaged [theatre] practitioners, the relationship with the academy is worth examining. The radical element of the practice becomes appropriated by the academy and is removed from the domain of public cultures to be re–packaged in endless academic texts as art and high–culture for bourgeois spectator/student. The work thus becomes an instrument of the domination and symbolic violence the practitioner might have initially sought to resist. The function of the academy in relation to practice in the cultures of late–capitalism is even more complicated. Non–Western film–makers, who come to the attention of Western critics, have found that their films, in spite of initially being conceived as local stories in local languages or as critiques of imperialism and colonisation (such as Sembene?s Fort Thoyard) are only circulated on the Western cultural festival and art–house circuit. Their knowledge that their main audience is the Western academy, and not the local or national public, eventually becomes reflected in their practice. Aesthetic ideology, disseminated by both practitioners and academics/critics, is the key practice by which such work is converted from use–value to exchange value."

Paula Gilligan. "The Criminal in the Academy:Practice Based Research as a Form of Theft".

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