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Which clippings match 'Filmmaking Process' keyword pg.1 of 1
28 DECEMBER 2012

Documentaries were always forms of re-presentation

"But as a strategy and a form, the interview–oriented film has problems of its own. ... the film–maker with intertitles, making patently clear what has been implicit all along: documentaries always were forms of re–presentation, never clear windows onto 'reality'; the film–maker was always a participant–witness and an active fabricator of meaning, a producer of cinematic discourse rather than a neautral or all–knowing reporter of the way things truely are."

(David MacDougall p.260, 1985)

MacDougall, David. "The Voice of Documentary", in Movies and Methods: Volume II, Bill Nichols ed. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1985.

Fig.1 Dana Perry and her son Evan Scott Perry, at age 3, HBO documentary "Boy Interrupted" [http://www.hbo.com/documentaries/boy–interrupted]

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TAGS

authorial intrusionauthorship • Bill Nichols • documentariesdocumentary • documentary interview • documentary representation of reality • documentary truthfilmfilm scholarshipfilm theoryfilmmaking processreal liferealismrealitiesrealityrepresentationrepresentational modesrepresentational strategies • semiological methods • structuralist-semiology • textual referencetheoretical perspectivestruthtruth and realitytruth of perception

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 DECEMBER 2012

An interview with the film editor Thelma Schoonmaker

David Poland/The DP/30 channel: posted Thursday 1st December 2011

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TAGS

2011American cinemaart and design practitionerscreative practice • David Poland • DP/30 channel • filmfilm editingfilm editorfilm industryfilmmakingfilmmaking process • Hugo (2011) • interviews with designersMartin ScorseseMichael Powellpost productionpractitioner interview • Shutter Island (2010) • storytellingtextual reference • the other side of the camera • Thelma Schoonmaker • women in filmwomen in the film industry

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 NOVEMBER 2012

The Hobbit: behind-the-scenes, Peter Jackson presents Video #9

Video #9 Published on YouTube 23 Nov 2012 by Peter Jackson (WingNut Films), Film premiere: 28 November 2012 (Wellington, New Zealand) Release Date: 13 December 2012 (UK)

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TAGS

2012 • 48 fps • Abbey Road Studios • Alan Lee • Andrew Lesnie • animationAotearoa New Zealandbehind-the-scenes • Bilbo Baggins • Brent Burge • CGI • Chris Tomlinson • Chris Ward • Chris White • Christian Rivers • Christopher Boyes • colour grading • Dave Farmer • Dave Hollingsworth • Dave Whitehead • David Clayton • digital intermediate • Embassy Theatre • Eric Saindon • feature filmfilmmaking process • foley • HFR • High Frame Rate • Holly Acton • Jabez Olssen • Jed Brophy • Jerry Kung • John Howe • John Simpson • Karen Elliott • Kevin Sherwood • Lonely Mountain • making of • Marion Davey • Michael Semanick • motion capture • New Line Cinema • Park Road Post • Peter Cobbin • Peter Jacksonpost productionpre-visualisation • Raqi Sayed • SFXsound stage • The Hobbit • UKVFXWarner BrosWellingtonWeta Digital • Weta Workshops • WingNut Films

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 NOVEMBER 2009

Tension & Release: What are the functions of rhythm in film?

"All of the tools, the choreographic processes, and the editor's sources of intuitive knowledge about editing a film's rhythm are used by editors in service of fulfilling rhythm's purposes in film. The question in this chapter is: What are the functions of rhythm in film? The following discussion suggests that the functions of rhythm are to create cycles of tension and release and to synchronize the spectator's physical, emotional, and cognitive fluctuations with the rhythms of the film."

(Karen Pearlman, 05 March 2008, The Art of the Guillotine)

Karen Pearlman, 2009. 'Cutting Rhythms: Shaping the Film Edit'. Focal Press.

Fig.1 Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho shower scene; Fig.2 CHAPTER 3: Timing, Pacing, and Trajectory Phrasing; Fig.3 CHAPTER 4: Tension, Release, and Synchronization; Fig.4. A podcast of Karen Pearlman.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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