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Which clippings match 'Authorial Intrusion' keyword pg.1 of 1
28 DECEMBER 2012

Documentaries were always forms of re-presentation

"But as a strategy and a form, the interview–oriented film has problems of its own. ... the film–maker with intertitles, making patently clear what has been implicit all along: documentaries always were forms of re–presentation, never clear windows onto 'reality'; the film–maker was always a participant–witness and an active fabricator of meaning, a producer of cinematic discourse rather than a neautral or all–knowing reporter of the way things truely are."

(David MacDougall p.260, 1985)

MacDougall, David. "The Voice of Documentary", in Movies and Methods: Volume II, Bill Nichols ed. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1985.

Fig.1 Dana Perry and her son Evan Scott Perry, at age 3, HBO documentary "Boy Interrupted" [http://www.hbo.com/documentaries/boy–interrupted]

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TAGS

authorial intrusionauthorship • Bill Nichols • documentariesdocumentary • documentary interview • documentary representation of reality • documentary truthfilmfilm scholarshipfilm theoryfilmmaking processreal liferealismrealitiesrealityrepresentationrepresentational modesrepresentational strategies • semiological methods • structuralist-semiology • textual referencetheoretical perspectivestruthtruth and realitytruth of perception

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 MARCH 2011

The camera's relation to reality is addressed directly by the documentary filmmaker

"The issue of the camera's relation to reality, which permeates the fiction film, is addressed directly by the documentary filmmaker, who has always aspired toward capturing the sight and sound of life in an unobtrusive and impartial manner. The ambivalent nature of the medium, which excludes the human element as an intermediary but nevertheless implies a subjective viewpoint, gives rise to issues concerning the camera's legitimacy to record the 'obscene' object of reality. Questions about what degrees of faithfulness to the truth establish a film as a documentary, and whether such faithfulness is even possible, have accompanied the history of documentary filmmaking since its origin.

In the meantime, partly due to the technological advancements, documentary underwent a revival, and experimentations with the new technology abounded. The answer of 'direct cinema', which included Richard Leacock, Donn A. Pennebaker and the Maysles brothers as its representatives, was a purist approach in which the impact of the observer on the observed had to be kept to a minimum. Interviews, voice–over commentary and any other forms of interaction with the subject matter were considered to contaminate the result of the observation. Others like, Pierre Perrault, used the new equipment to draw meaning from the seemingly insignificant and the quotidian, attempting to find greater meaning in and unity to the whole by observing and bringing together the small elements of everyday life."

(Barbara Bruni, Senses of Cinema)

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TAGS

ambivalence • Andre Bazinauthorial intrusion • Chronicle of a Summer • cinema veritecommentaryconstructed realitydirect cinemadocumentarydocumentary filmmakerdocumentary filmmakingdocumentary truthDonn A. Pennebaker • Edgar Morin • ethnographiceveryday lifeexperimentationfiction filmimpartiality • intermediary • interviewJean Rouch • Lightning Over Water • Maysles Brothersmedium • Nicholas Ray • observation • Pierre Perrault • realityRichard LeacockSenses of Cinema (journal)subjective viewpointtechnological advancements • The Human Pyramid • truth • unobtrusive • voice-over • voice-over commentary

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 OCTOBER 2003

Deleuzian Memory of Sans Soleil

"Deleuze's notion of time–image cinema describes a revolutionary and political cinema. To understand time–image cinema, we must contrast it with movement–image cinema, 'in which frame follows frame according to necessities of action, subordinating time to movement.'1 Clearly, Sans Soleil is nothing like movement–image cinema. The film has no action or plot that could subordinate time; instead, Marker claims that the only qualification these images have for being included in the film is that they quicken the heart. These images span many different time periods from World War II to the present, and a scene is just as likely to cut to West Africa or San Francisco as it is to cut to a different angle within the same room. In the film, an unnamed and unseen narrator reads the fictitious letters of Sandor Krasna, a traveling cameraman (a thinly–veiled alter–ego for Marker)."

(B.C. Holmes)

TAGS

16mm • Alexandra Stewart • Anne-Marie L Hote • Antoine Bonfanti • Arielle Dombasle • authorial intrusion • Bajazet (1672) • Beaulieu (camera) • Catherine Adda • Charlotte Kerr • Chris Markercinema • Daniele Tessier • Eugenio Bentivoglio • fictitiousness • Florence Delay • Gilles Deleuze • global histories • Guinea-Bissau • Haroun Tazieff • Hayao Yamaneko • human memory • IcelandJames StewartJapan • Jean Racine • Jean-Michel Humeau • Judy Burton • Kasabian (band) • Kim NovakLa Jeteeletters • Madeleine Elster • Mario Marret • meditation • Modest Mussorgsky • movement-imagenarrationnarratorParis • Paul Bertault • personal histories • Pierre Camus • Riyoko Ikeda • San Francisco • Sana Na N hada • Sandor KrasnaSans Soleil (1983) • Spectron video synthesizer • Stalker (1979)stock footageThomas Stearns Eliottime-imagetravelogueVertigo (1958)video synthesizerWorld War II
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