Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Abandoned Streets' keyword pg.1 of 1
11 MARCH 2011

La Jetee: a science-fiction film about time, memory and history

"This is the story of a man, marked by an image from his childhood. The violent scene that upsets him, and whose meaning he was to grasp only years later, happened on the main jetty at Orly, the Paris airport, sometime before the outbreak of World War III.

Orly, Sunday. Parents used to take their children there to watch the departing planes.

On this particular Sunday, the child whose story we are telling was bound to remember the frozen sun, the setting at the end of the jetty, and a woman's face.

Nothing sorts out memories from ordinary moments. Later on they do claim remembrance when they show their scars. That face he had seen was to be the only peacetime image to survive the war. Had he really seen it? Or had he invented that tender moment to prop up the madness to come?

The sudden roar, the woman's gesture, the crumpling body, and the cries of the crowd on the jetty blurred by fear.

Later, he knew he had seen a man die.

And sometime after came the destruction of Paris. ..."

(Chris Marker, 1962)

Fig.1 [Français] Chris Marker (1962). "La Jetée", Argos Films.

1
2

TAGS

1962abandoned streetsacross timeairportapocalypse • childhood image • Chris Marker • cine-roman • circular narrative structuredeathdestruction • Etienne Becker • Helene Chatelain • history • Jean Negroni • jettyLa Jeteememory • Orly • Parisphoto filmphoto romanphotographic stillspierportal (science fiction)science-fictionsequence designspectaclespeculative fictionstill imagetimetime travel • Twelve Monkeys • visual depiction

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 JANUARY 2004

Paris streets as crime-scene evidence

"Eugene Atget, who, around 1900, took photographs of deserted Paris streets. It has quite justly been said of him that he photographed them like scenes of crime. The scene of a crime, too, is deserted; it is photographed for the purpose of establishing evidence. With Atget, photographs become standard evidence for historical occurrences, and acquire a hidden political significance. They demand a specific kind of approach; free–floating contemplation is not appropriate to them. They stir the viewer; he feels challenged by them in a new way. At the same time picture magazines begin to put up signposts for him, right ones or wrong ones, no matter. For the first time, captions have become obligatory. And it is clear that they have an altogether different character than the title of a painting. The directives which the captions give to those looking at pictures in illustrated magazines soon become even more explicit and more imperative in the film where the meaning of each single picture appears to be prescribed by the sequence of all preceding ones."
(Walter Benjamin)

Benjamin, Walter (1988). 'Illuminations', New York, US: Random House.

Fig.1 Eugène Atget (French, 1857–1927), 'Boulevard de Strasbourg 1912', Albumen silver print from glass negative 22.4 x 17.5 cm (8 13/16 x 6 7/8 in.). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gilman Collection, Purchase, Ann Tenenbaum and Thomas H. Lee Gift, 2005.

1

TAGS

1900 • abandoned streetscaptioncity • crime scene • deserted streets • empty streets • Eugene Atget • forensic evidence • forensics • free-floating • free-floating contemplationimplied movementliving picturesParis • Paris streets • photographphotography • signpost • silenceslice of frozen timestill lifestill life photographystillnessstreetsWalter Benjamin
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.