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Which clippings match 'Folded Paper Design' keyword pg.1 of 1
10 SEPTEMBER 2015

Virtual reality is now a cereal toy

"It's sometimes hard to remember how far virtual reality has come in recent years. Not just in terms of technical achievement (though that's impressive), but also mainstream awareness. The idea of strapping a VR headset to your face is so common now, that Kellogg's is offering cardboard goggles with its breakfast cereal. A new promotion for Nutri-Grain in New Zealand lets customers construct their own headset from a cereal box, with the display provided by their smartphone. An official app offers access to a handful of 360-degree VR experiences including wingsuiting and a downhill mountain bike ride."

(James Vincent, 9 September 2015, The Verge)

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TAGS

360 degree view • 360-degree VR experience • advertising and promotion • advertising promotion • Aotearoa New Zealandapp • breakfast cereal • cardboard goggles • cardboard headset • cardboard virtual reality goggles • cereal • cereal box • cheap solution • folded paper design • fully-immersive • Kelloggs • mainstream awareness • mobile phone • mountain bike ride • Nutri-Grain • promotional material • QR code • smartphoneultra-low-techusablevirtual realityvirtual reality experienceVR headset • wingsuit

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 FEBRUARY 2015

Build your own (smartphone enabled) cardboard Oculus Rift

"In the past week or so, you've probably heard about Google Cardboard, Google's lovably wry answer to the Oculus Rift. The Rift, of course, is a gadget that has gotten millions of dollars in funding and a multi–billion dollar Facebook buyout, and will cost hundreds of dollars at launch. Google Cardboard is a piece of cardboard with a couple of special lenses and a place to put a smartphone. Snickers and high fives were no doubt had.

The cool thing is that Google Cardboard is no joke—the rig actually provides a virtual reality experience when you use it with a smartphone and the Cardboard app. Well, now you can get a knock–off cardboard VR rig, and yes, we're living in a time when that's a real thing."

(Helena Stone, 30 September 2014, Chip Chick)

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2014accessible designassembly instructionscardboard • Cardboard app • cardboard headset • CardboardSDK iOS • Chrome VR Experiments • Damien Henry • David Coz • DIYDIY craftsfolded paper designfreely available • Google Cardboard • Google Cardboard SDK • Google I/O • head-tracking • head-worn display • headset • immersionimmersive experience • immersive virtual reality • iOS 8 • magnetometer • mobile VR headset • Oculus Rift • open development • OpenGLschematic diagramsmartphonestereoscopic • stereoscopic display software • ultra-low-techvirtual realityvirtual reality experienceVRVR headsetwearable devicesWebGL

CONTRIBUTOR

Mik Parsons
29 APRIL 2013

Colourful cut-out card illustrations by Eiko Ojala

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 DECEMBER 2012

Verknipte tijden / Distorted times

Fig.1 Gideon van der Stelt (2012). "Verknipte tijden / Distorted times", collage of existing film fragments, released into my paper–folded version of Utrecht. Shot on a 7D and processed in After Effects.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Andy Love
26 MARCH 2010

Dirkon: innovative paper cut-out camera

"During the 1970s, magazines published in Communist Czechoslovakia were controlled by the state, like the majority of other enterprises. Very few good magazines were available and were difficult to get hold of, so people would borrow and exchange them when given the opportunity. This also applied to magazines aimed at young people, which was probably one of the reasons why almost everyone from my generation, when we get on to the subject of pinhole cameras, has fond memories of the cut–out paper camera known as Dirkon*, published in 1979 in the magazine ABC mladých techniků a přírodovědců [An ABC of Young Technicians and Natural Scientists].

Its creators, Martin Pilný, Mirek Kolář and Richard Vyškovský, came up with a functional pinhole camera made of stiff paper, designed for 35 mm film, which resembles a real camera. It may not be the most practical of devices, but it works!

My first attempt at putting together a paper Dirkon a few years after it came out fell victim to a total lack of patience on my part. Today, twenty years later, I decided that I had to include this unusual pinhole camera in my collection. So I got hold of an old copy of ABC and set to work....

* The name Dirkon is a play on words based on the combination of the parts of two words: Dirk– is the beginning of the Czech word dírka–pinhole, and –kon is the end of the name of a well–known Japanese camera which needs no introduction.

A few notes about the original instructions

For the patient among you, here are the instructions for making the Dirkon camera which you can download in Adobe PDF format. But first a few notes which I've jotted down after my experience with making it, which you might find useful.

The camera must be cut out of stiffer paper than ordinary office paper (or thin card). If the paper isn't entirely opaque, you need to stick very thin black paper underneath the important sections so that no light gets into the camera. This is particularly important for sections 1, 2, 3, 10 and 23.

It is very important to print the cut–out to the correct size, i.e. 1 : 1. When you are printing from the Acrobat Reader, the option "Fit to page" MUST NOT be selected, otherwise the pages might come out smaller and the film won't fit into the Dirkon camera. I've added a ruler on each page so that you can check that the size is correct.

The instructions recommend using Foma 21° DIN film. This was film made back in former Czechoslovakia but it's similar, for example, to today's Ilford PAN 100. You can of course use any 35 mm film, even colour.

I discovered from the makers of Dirkon that, even when it was published, people often came up with improvements on their model. The design was significantly improved by sticking on a thin piece of metal with a hole, rather than making the hole in the paper, as described in the instructions. I didn't follow this suggestion, however, since I wanted to experience the real magic of Dirkon photography."

(David Balihar)

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1970s197935mm • ABC mladych techniku a prirodovedcu • An ABC of Young Technicians and Natural Scientists • cameracardboardcut-outCzech RepublicCzechoslovakiadesigndevicediagram • Dirkon • folded paper designimprovisationinnovationlow-tech • Martin Pilny • Mirek Kolar • Nikonpaper • paper camera • papercraftphotography • pinhole • pinhole camera • Richard Vyskovsky • ultra-low-tech

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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