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Which clippings match 'Environment That Adds Value' keyword pg.1 of 1
17 SEPTEMBER 2013

Physical Space as Brand Innovation

"Prior to Starbucks, coffee shops in the U.S. were designed to be purely transactional. The most frequently analyzed metric was sales per square feet, and the concept of a store dedicating valuable space just for customers to hang out after they had bought something was unheard of. We all know how it panned out. Starbucks is globally known and a second home for many.

Barnes & Noble adopted the trend. They added lounge chairs and then Starbucks itself to their locations. The bookstore café became a place to visit consistently and to explore, hang out, and to be alone together.

Last week, I spent two hours online at a Peet's Coffee & Tea in Santa Clara, California. Something important has changed: People now work independently online. Before the days of free wifi, people used to mingle with friends over coffee. At Peet's, I spent most of my time in my "fourth places"––my online communities, including Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and OpenSky. Looking around, everyone was doing the same. We came for the wifi and bought the coffee."

(John Caplan, 16 September 2013, Inc.com)

Fig.1 Nick Kenrick [http://www.flickr.com/photos/zedzap/6820585431/]

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TAGS

alone togetherBarnes and Noble • bookstore cafe • brand innovation • cafe officecafe society • coffee shops • effective brand spaceenvironment that adds value • fourth place • free wifi • hanging out • Inc.com • lounge chairs • mingleonline communities • OpenSky • Peets Coffee and Tea • physical consumer spacephysical environmentphysical retail spacephysical space • place to visit • retail space • sales per square feet • Santa Clara • shop conceptsshopping behavioursocial appssocial fragmentationspatial environmentsStarbuckstransactionWiFi • work independently online • working practices

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 DECEMBER 2012

Designing the Bookshop of the Future

"What makes a good bookshop? Should second–hand be in the mix too? Is a café important? How do you incorporate digital? Foyles' clarion call at the Bookseller's FutureBook conference in London last week seeks to answer some of these questions.

The retailer has joined forces with the Bookseller to invite customers and industry experts to help design its new flagship on Charing Cross Road, which it will move into in early 2014. With discoverability of increasing importance, the timing couldn't be more apposite. Everyone is agreed that bricks and mortar bookshops are under threat, but what elements are needed to make a physical bookstore survive in an increasingly digital world? ...

'Foyles has to create something that gives people an experience,' said former London Book Fair Director Alistair Burtenshaw. 'It has to be a destination store, a shop in which people want to spend a considerable amount of time. It has to be an environment that adds value. When you make it a more personalized experience, you are happy to pay more."

(Roger Tagholm, 12 December 2012)

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TAGS

2014 • Alistair Burtenshaw • booksellersbookshop • bookshop of the future • bricks and mortarcafeCharing Cross Roadconference • consumer destination • Covent Gardencustomersdestination imagedestination storedigital worlddiscoverabilitydwell timeeconomic recessionenvironment that adds valueexperience design • Foyles (shop) • FutureBook (conference) • high streethigh street shopsincorporate digital • Livraria Cultura • London • London Book Fair • Miriam Robinson • personalised experience • Philip Jones • physical bookstorephysical presencephysical storeretailerSao Paolo • second-hand • shift to digitalshopspatial environmentsspend time • Stanfords Travel Bookshop • The Bookseller • UK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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