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Which clippings match 'Absurdist Humour' keyword pg.1 of 1
25 JUNE 2015

What is the Cut-Up Method?

"The writer Ken Hollings examines how an artistic device called the 'cut-up' has been employed by artists and satirists to create new meanings from pre-existing recorded words.

Today's digital age has allowed multi-media satirists like Cassetteboy to mock politicians and TV celebrities online by re-editing - or cutting up - their broadcast words. But the roots of this technique go back to the early days of the avant-garde. The intention has always been to amuse, to surprise, and to question.

The founder of the Dadaist movement, the poet Tristan Tzara, proposed in 1920 that a poem could be created simply by pulling random words cut from a newspaper out of a hat. And it was this idea of the random juxtaposition of text, of creating new meanings from pre-existing material, that so appealed to the painter Brion Gysin in the late 1950s when he and his friend, the American writer William S Burroughs, began applying the technique not just to text but to other media too - including words recorded on tape."

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1920absurdist humourAlan Sugar • Armando Iannucci • artistic device • avant-garde experimental technique • BBC Radio 1 • BBC Radio 4Brion Gysin • broadcast news • Cassetteboy • Chris Morris • Coldcut (duo) • collaged togethercut-upcut-up techniqueDada movement • Dan Shepherd • Doug Kahn • George W Bush • Julie Andrews • juxtaposition • Ken Hollings • Kevin Foakes (aka DJ Food) • Lenka Clayton • Matt Black • mocking • Negativland • Pierre Schaeffer • pulled out of the hat • random juxtaposition • random wordsre-editre-purposeremix cultureRonald Reagan • sound-poetry • State of the Union • tape cut-up • The Apprentice (UK TV series)The Sound of Music (1965)Tristan TzaraVicki BennettWalter RuttmannWilliam Burroughs

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 MAY 2015

Wunderland an exhibition by Frank Kunert at La Chambre

Photography exhibition 'Wunderland' by Frank Kunert, 10 April to 7 June 2015, La Chambre, 4 place d’Austerlitz, 67000 Strasbourg.

"More than simply a photographic satire, the 'miniature worlds' of Frank Kunert are compositions of ideas, models of sets which he spends weeks and months meticulously putting together from plastic, modeling clay and paint until the results are perfect, almost lifelike. These 'miniature worlds' are funny, bizarre, grotesque, contemplative, dreamy, but also provocative and critical. It's up to the viewer to decide if he finds them entertaining or macabre, or how far he's willing or able to follow the stories Kunert tells."

(The Eye of Photography, L’Oeil de la Photographie)

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absurdist humourabsurditybanalityblack humour • contemplative • critical art • Frank Kunert • funny scenes • humourlifelikemacabreminiatureminiature worlds • photographic satire • photography exhibition • provocative scenes • small sculpturesstupidity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 JULY 2014

The Phantom of Liberty: humorous critique of bourgeois conventions

"Luis Buñuel's The Phantom of Liberty was quickly dismissed upon its release in 1974. Not only did it have to contend with the lingering success of 1972's similarly themed but significantly less abstract The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie, but it was quickly followed by the dreamlike, bi–polar romantic entanglement of the director's last film, That Obscure Object of Desire. Like Discreet Charm, the plot–free Phantom of Liberty is a patchwork of comedic sketches and sight gags through which Buñuel ravages a complacent European culture and the various sexual hang–ups and historical and cultural disconnects of its inhabitants. This heady, almost off–putting masterwork isn't particularly easy to decipher (maybe we aren't meant to), which is why it's best to approach it as a literal comedy of manners.

Films structured around daisy chains of dysfunction are a dime a dozen; most, though, are as tiresomely long–winded as they are content with their own strained circularity. This isn't the case with Phantom of Liberty, which begins with a shot of Goya's 1808 masterpiece 'The Third of May.' The painting depicts Napoleon's army executing a group of faceless Spaniards, and via a reenactment of this struggle, Buñuel depicts how one of Napoleon's captains tries to defile the monument of Doña Elvira only to be smacked on the head by the moving arm of the statue of the woman's husband. (He later intends to sleep with the woman's corpse, and when he opens her coffin, he's amazed by how her beauty has been preserved.) It's the first of many sight gags in the film, each and every one as startling as they are perversely funny. All these moments are possessed by a sense of shocked wonderment and discovery, and they all more or less evoke fragile pasts and characters trying to reconcile their historical detachments."

(Ed Gonzalez, 13 September 2003, Slant Magazine)

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1974absurd situationsabsurdist humourabsurdity • Adolfo Celi • Adriana Asti • Anne-Marie Deschott • apparition • Arch de Triomphe • archaic rules • Bernard Verley • black humour • bourgeois • bourgeoise societycancer • chance encounter • cigarettes • Claude Pieplu • coffin • comedic sketches • comedycomedy of mannerscorpsecritiquecultural conventionscultural pastdaughterdining practicesdinner tabledisappearancedoctor • Dona Elvira • eatingepisodic structureetiquetteEuropean cinema • European culture • faith • Francois Maistre • girl • Goya • Helene Perdriere • hotel • housemaid • humour • impulses • internal logic • intrusion • Jean Rochefort • Jean-Claude Brialy • Julien Bertheau • Le Fantome de la Liberte (1974) • Luis Bunuel • mailman • masterwork • Michael Lonsdale • Michel Piccoli • Milena Vukotic • Monica Vitti • Montparnasse • morality • nanny • narrative preconceptions • obscene • ostrich • parodypatchwork • Paul Frankeur • phallicphallic symbol • Philippe Brigaud • Pierre Maguelon • policepolite societypostcard • postman • psychoanalysisritual • rooster • rulesschool • schoolchildren • Serge Silberman • sexual hang-ups • sexual taboo • sight gag • sketch comedy • sniper • social behavioursocial conventionsSpanish filmsubconscioussurrealist cinemasurrealist filmmakertaboo • That Obscure Object of Desire (1977) • The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972) • The Phantom of Liberty (1974) • The Third of May (1808) • toilettriptych • vanished • visual gagzoo

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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