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Which clippings match 'Theatrical Staging' keyword pg.1 of 1
13 AUGUST 2013

Sonia Delaunay and the Art Simultané

"Together, the Delaunay [Sonia and Robert Delaunay] start a research on color that will be the essence, the content and the form but also the line of a new painting for a non–figurative art. Influenced by the Fauvism, she first presents works whose subjects and models are marked, slashed by the brutality of the shades. Creative perfection to aim at, the music offers to the artists, at this time, the philosophical assessment that will underlie their respective works. Powerful associations of rhythms and melodies, the compositions gather in the idea of 'simultaneous' what makes a new challenge for poets and painters. Sonia Delaunay then progressively develops a lyrical use and signification of the color, close from cubism, between rhythm and shade. Repetitions of forms, structures but also colors, her paintings take a direction all her artistic propositions will follow."

(Ozarts Etc, 3 December 2011)

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TAGS

abstract artabstract artists • art and fashion • art simultanecar • Citroen • colour • colour and fashion • colour and light • colour blocking • contrasting colour • costume designcubist and abstract artcubist conceptionsdesign formalismdesignerfabricfashion design • Fauvism • female artistgeometric designsmodern artmodern womanmodernist aestheticsmodernist paintingmosaicmovement-imagemulti-disciplinary • multi-disciplinary artist • mural • non-figurative art • paintingpatchworkpatchwork quiltpatternrepetitionRobert DelaunaysimultaneismsimultaneitySonia Delaunaytextile design • textiles design • theatrical stage design • theatrical staging • Tissus Delaunay • vibrant colourvisual abstractionvisual artistvisual contrastvorticismwomen artistswomen in art and designzig-zag

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 OCTOBER 2008

Jarman's Caravaggio: injection of period anachronisms

"Arguably the director's most approachable film, Caravaggio feels like a work more concerned with tone and texture than storytelling. The narrative does move in a coherent fashion if one is paying attention, but the succession of ravishing images ultimately overwhelms the senses to the extent that any character development is secondary. Jarman's usual idiosyncracies are in evidence, such as his injection of period anachronisms (modern formal dress, typewriters, and so on) at odd moments to provide modern analogies"
(Nathaniel Thompson)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 OCTOBER 2008

Dogville: artificial and claustrophobic

"Von Trier begins by casually rejecting a fundamental tenet of the cinema. Even the most minimalist storytellers are obliged to place their actors in a physical space: back lots and painted sets may be deliberately artificial, but they always have walls and doors. Dogville is set on a pitch black sound stage with minimal props and schematic chalk outlines on the floor in lieu of walls. (It's like watching The Phantom Menace at a nascent stage, the actors adrift against bare blue walls before the backgrounds and animation are grafted on.) Whenever the camera pulls back for a wide shot, every inhabitant of the tiny hamlet is clearly visible, miming their daily tasks in their 'houses.' At first this archly theatrical staging, with its deadpan narration, ironic chapter headings and characters knocking on non–existent doors while we hear the thumping on the soundtrack, seems to be Brechtian alienation run amok. Yet as the story grinds grimly forward the inescapability of the townspeople in each shot shifts from a clever metaphor for small town claustrophobia to a palpably oppressive reality."

(Gary Mairs)

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TAGS

2003artificeBertolt Brecht • chalk outlines • cinemaclaustrophobiacoherent space • Dogville (2003) • film designfilm stylisationLars von Triermise-en-scene • Nicole Kidman • production designset designsound stageterritorytheatrical staging

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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