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Which clippings match 'Marketing Communication' keyword pg.1 of 1
06 JUNE 2014

Co-option used to promote ethical consumption practices

1

TAGS

1967advertising analysisanimal farmschickenco-option • Compassion in World Farming (organisation) • consumption practicescrueltyemotive manipulationethical consumptionethical practicesevocative advertising • factory farming practices • farm animal • farm animal welfare • farming • food marketing • food productionintensive agriculture • intensive factory farming • intensive farminglecture formatmarketing communicationmeat production • Nestle Shreddies • poultry • poultry farming • product innovation • product labelling • product rebranding • public presentation • rhetorical fearsystemised crueltywillful ignorance

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JANUARY 2013

A theory about the power of persuasive communication

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TAGS

animated presentationauthority • concorde • consensusconsistency • gift-exchange • human naturelegitimating criterialevels of meaninglikedlikes • liking • marketing communicationpatterns of activationpersuasionpersuasive communicationpersuasively suggestivepsychological perceptionreciprocity • Robert Cialdini • scarcity • science of persuasion • scientifically proven • social obligation • Steve Martin • trust and reputationuniversal principles

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 DECEMBER 2012

Theorizing Advertising and Promotion

"The visual rhetoric of ads is not, then, confined to the copy. An ad is an argument, a persuasive communication. Every part of it must support the main argument, must be persuasively suggestive. A press ad for Retinol Activ Pur face cream used a clever visual metaphor to support a claim that the cream reduced facial wrinkles. The ad featured two juxtaposed images of a beautiful (Caucasian) woman. She was wearing what seemed to be a white robe, folded over one shoulder like a Roman toga. In the background was a pure blue sky and a suggestion of white pillars, of the kind found in a Greek temple. One picture was cracked, like the surface of an old oil painting. The other was smooth. The metaphoric reference was clear: the cracks suggested wrinkles, but in an elegant way that was complimentary, not demeaning, to age. Old paintings are things of classical beauty, but the paint does tend to crack with age. The ad was designed to draw the eye across aesthetically appealing images while giving the reader heavy hints about the classic beauty they might aspire to if they were to consume the brand.

However the levels of meaning in advertisements are theorized. Acknowledging their presence lends a new dimension to the analysis of advertising as persuasive communication. It brings to light some of the subtlety and complexity of advertising design, while also allowing us to draw an intellectual connection between the various artificially differentiated categories of marketing communication."

(Chris Hackley, 2010)

Chris Hackley (2010). "Advertising and Promotion: An Integrated Marketing Communications Approach", Second Edition, SAGE Publications Ltd.

TAGS

2010adadsadvertisementadvertising and promotionadvertising design • aesthetically appealing images • artificially differentiated categories • beautifulblue sky • Caucasian woman • classic beauty • classical beauty • crack with age • demeaningface cream • facial wrinkles • Greek temple • heavy hints • juxtaposed imageslevels of meaningmarketing communicationmetaphoric referenceoil painting • old paintings • persuasive communicationpersuasively suggestive • press ad • Retinol Activ Pur • Roman toga • visual metaphorvisual rhetoric • white pillars • white robe • wrinkles

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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