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Which clippings match 'Storytelling' keyword pg.2 of 3
27 DECEMBER 2012

An interview with the film editor Thelma Schoonmaker

David Poland/The DP/30 channel: posted Thursday 1st December 2011

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TAGS

2011American cinemaart and design practitionerscreative practice • David Poland • DP/30 channel • filmfilm editingfilm editorfilm industryfilmmakingfilmmaking process • Hugo (2011) • interviews with designersMartin ScorseseMichael Powellpost productionpractitioner interview • Shutter Island (2010) • storytellingtextual reference • the other side of the camera • Thelma Schoonmaker • women in filmwomen in the film industry

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 JULY 2012

From LMS to VLE or from supermarkets to airports: Classifying elearning platforms using metaphors

"This paper presents a rational model developed to make sense of various elearning platforms currently in use in Australian universities. The conceptualisation and organisation of the elearning platforms is underpinned by an educational psychology framework of social construction of meaning, data visualisation and story telling for meaning making. The model explains how various elearning platforms can be integrated to represent a threedimensional, hierarchical construct that has the potential to aid understandings about the utility of information systems (IS) for learning and teaching. The model shows that LAMS, which has gained increasing popularity in Europe (Laurillard & Masterman, 2010), is usefully depicted as a 'middle ground' system, successfully bridging conventional LMSs and more advanced IS, referred here as (MU)VLEs (Multi–User Virtual Learning Environments). The model has important implications on how university lecturers, classroom teachers and students come to engage with an increasingly complex elearning environment."

(Eva Dobozy & Patricia Reynolds, LAMS Conference Sydney 2010)

Dobozy, E. & Reynolds, P. (2010). From LMS to VLE or from supermarkets to airports: Classifying elearning platforms using metaphors. Proceedings of the 5th International LAMS Conference 2010. http://lamsfoundation.org/lams2010sydney/papers.htm

TAGS

2010airport • airport metaphor • AustraliaAustralian universitiesclassification scheme • classifying • classroomcollaborationconceptual modelconceptualisationconference paper • constructivist approach • data visualisationDiana Laurillarde-learninge-learning application • e-learning conference • e-learning platformeducational psychologyelearning • elearning environments • elearning platforms • electronic portfolioengagement • Eva Dobozy • hierarchical orderinginformation systemsinformation visualisation • IS • LAMS • LAMS Conference • learninglearning and teachinglearning designlearning design support environmentlecturer • Liz Masterman • LMSmeaning makingmetaphor • Multi-User Virtual Learning Environments • MUVLE • Patricia Reynolds • pedagogysocial construction of meaningsocial constructivismsocial-constructivist approachstorytellingstudentssupermarketteachinguser requirementsvisual metaphorVLE

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MARCH 2012

The Future of the Book: design speculation

"The Future of the Book is a design exploration of digital reading that seeks to identify new opportunities for readers, publishers, and authors to discover, consume, and connect in different formats.

As more people consume pages in pixels, IDEO designers wondered why we continue to discover and consume the written word through the old analog, page–turning model. We asked: what happens when the reading experience catches up with new technologies?

The team looked at how digital and analog books currently are being read, shared and collected, as well as at trends, business models and consumer behavior within related fields. We identified three distinct opportunities – new narratives, social reading with richer context, and providing tools for critical thinking – and developed a design concept around each one.

The first concept, 'Alice,' turns storytelling on its head by making narratives non–linear and participatory. With Alice, the story world starts bleeding into the everyday life of the reader. Real–world challenges, like acting on a phone call from the lead character, or participating in photo based scavenger hunts, unlock new aspects of the story, and turn other readers into collaborators or competitors. Alice is a platform for authors to experiment with narratives, to allow their stories to transcend media, and to engage fans in the storytelling process.

The second concept, 'Coupland,' makes book discovery a social activity by allowing readers to build shared libraries and hear about additional texts through existing networks. Coupland makes it easy for busy professionals to stay on top of industry must–reads. Businesses can assign book budgets to their employees and build collective libraries through a group–licensing model. Personal recommendations, aggregation of reading patterns, and the ability to follow inspiring individuals and groups help ensure that Coupland users always are tapped into the latest essential content within and outside of the organization.

The third concept, 'Nelson,' connects books to commentary, critique, and contextual information, letting readers explore a topic from multiple perspectives. Nelson reinforces the role of books as carriers of knowledge and insight. Readers can explore polarizing material and see whose word currently has the greatest impact on popular opinion and debate. Layers of connected commentary, news, and fact–checking augment the core book content – providing greater context and encouraging debate and scrutiny.

Each concept features a simple, accessible storytelling format and a particular look and feel. We believe that digital technology creates possibilities, so our solutions truly adapt to the new environment, rather than emulate analog qualities onscreen. For example, we resisted any temptation to move books closer to the bite–sized character of other digital media, because longhand writing encourages immersion (deep reading) and reflection."

(IDEO, 2010)

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TAGS

2010Alice in Wonderlandanalogue bookbooks • collective libraries • connected commentary • consumer behaviour • contextual information • convergence • deep reading • design concept • design exploration • different formats • digital booksdigital mediadigital readingdigital technology • Douglas Coupland • end of printenvisioningformatfuture of the bookgo digitalhybrid formIDEO • inspiring individuals • intertwingularity • longhand writing • look and feelmedia formsmultiple perspectives • must-reads • narrative • new narratives • new opportunitiesnew technologiesnon-linearoff the pagepage-turning model • pages in pixels • personal recommendation • pictures under glass • reader • readersreading experience • reading patterns • rich context • shared libraries • social activity • social readingspeculative designstorystorytellingstorytelling formattechnology convergenceTed Nelsonthe future of the booktrendswritten word

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 NOVEMBER 2011

Expressive Processing: Digital Fictions, Computer Games, and Software Studies

"Wardrip–Fruin builds upon the foundation laid by Lev Manovich, who, in his 2002 book The Language of New Media, suggested that the natural development of media studies in an age of 'programmable media' should be 'software studies' (a set of approaches which includes 'expressive processing' but also code studies which, in Wardrip–Fruin's words, looks at 'the specific text of code' written by developers).

Expressive Processing fulfills and extends the promise of Manovich's ideas, putting the theory into practice through a set of case studies of the artificial intelligence engines of a dozen or so software programs that might be loosely called 'games.' That the first real example of a software studies approach comes out of game studies is both to be expected and (somewhat) regretted. On one hand, games of the sort Wardrip–Fruin examines are a medium for storytelling and character creation, and as such are natural extensions of the work of previous literary and media studies scholars and thereby set up a convenient space for humanities scholars and teachers to consider the important cultural and technical issues raised by Wardrip–Fruin in an environment more familiar than, for instance, an analysis of the software that drives Walmart (one of Wardrip–Fruin's suggestions for another work of software studies scholarship). Unfortunately, like graphic novels and musical theater, the genre is still too easily dismissed as popular entertainment by too many of those who most need to hear Wardrip–Fruin's arguments."

(Doug Reside, 2010)

Reside, D. (Fall 2010). "A review of Noah Wardrip–Fruin's Expressive Processing: Digital Fictions, Computer Games, and Software Studies." Digital Humanities Quarterly 4(2).

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TAGS

academic journal • ADHO • codecode studiescultural analyticsdatadigital culturedigital humanities • Digital Humanities Quarterly (academic journal) • expressive processing • game studiesgraphic novelhumanitiesinformation aestheticsLev Manovichliterary studiesmedia studiesmusical theatre • Noah Wardrip-Fruin • popular culture • popular entertainment • programmable mediasoftwaresoftware literacysoftware studiesstorytellingtext of codeThe Language of New Mediavisualisation • Walmart

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 AUGUST 2011

Iain McCaig: a career of being creative

"Iain is an internationally recognized and award winning artist and one of the motion picture industry's leading conceptual designers. His exceptional command of human anatomy, character, emotional expression and visual narrative make him on of the most sought after artists working in the entertainment industry today."

(Iain McCaig, University of New South Wales)

Fig.1 Published on 25 Jul 2011 by UNSWCommunity

[At 19:00 the interviewer explains that Andrew Pienaar from Pixar describes his process of becoming 'creatively unstuck' as one where he refers to images that he has collected which he has stored in a drawer at Pixar. He explained that sometimes it's enough to just imagine the images in the collection for him to become 'unstuck'. Iain McCaig (19:45 – 20:45) builds on this by explaining that he understands the same process in terms of a metaphor of a library where the library is a 'resource in your mind' that you constantly keep referring and adding to –that you constantly keep re–reading.]

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TAGS

Andrew Pienaar • animatorartart and design practitionerscabinet of curiosities • career in animation • collection of ideascollection of references • College of Fine Arts • concept art • concept artist • creative practice • creatively unstuck • creativitydrawingfantasyfantasy art • filing cabinet metaphor • film concept design • flip it • George Lucas • Glasgow School of Art • hero • Iain McCaig • ideasillustratorinspiration • library metaphor • practitioner interview • resource in your mind • Sesame StreetsketchstorytellingUniversity of New South WalesUNSW • UNSW COFA • visual storytelling

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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