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Which clippings match '1915' keyword pg.1 of 1
20 JUNE 2017

Sons of Gallipoli: award-winning interactive documentary

"While the story of Gallipoli has been told many times, never has it been told in such a rich and deeply immersive way. For the first time, the tragedy of Gallipoli is brought to life in a profoundly human way as two mothers imagine what it must have been like for other mothers, 100 years ago. Two women on opposite sides. So different. Yet each struggling to understand the meaning of war."

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TAGS

19151916ANZACAotearoa New Zealandarchive footageAustralasiaAustralia • British Commonwealth • circular interface • Commonwealth • Commonwealth countries • Commonwealth of Nations • Cook Islands • cultural heritagedigital heritageGallipoli Campaign • Gallipoli peninsula • hypermedia • immersive cultural heritage experiences • immersive storytellinginteractive digital narrativesinteractive documentaryinteractive experienceinteractive mediainteractive multimedia documentaryinteractive multimedia videointeractive web documentary • military failures • military history • Niue • Ottoman EmpirePapua New Guinea • Pitcairn Islands • Samoa • Tonga • Turkishwarweb based non-linear narrativesweb documentarywebdocWorld War IWWI

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 JANUARY 2016

Herland: the forgotten feminist classic from 1915

"Charlotte Perkins Gilman's novel, Herland, is regarded by many as the pioneering feminist utopian novel. Authored in 1915 (but published as a monograph only in 1978), Herland is intended as a social critique, and as a sociological theorist, Gilman sees herself as a change agent for a better social life for women especially, as well as society in general. Like other intellectuals at the turn of the 20th century, Gilman struggled to theorise her social vision, whilst simultaneously placing great efforts at promoting her vision in a package that is attractive to the masses. By self-consciously distancing herself from the intellectuals of her time, she crafted her works as endeavours at transforming society. With the utopian novel as her genre of choice, Gilman provides readers with a deeper sense of understanding of the ills of a society that subscribes to and is fixated with masculinity. As such, it is the contention of this paper to discuss Gilman's second novel, Herland as a feminist utopian novel critiquing some aspects of culture Gilman describes as androcentric and to briefly link the images portrayed by Gilman in Herland to the Jungian theory of archetypes with some reference to female archetypal images."

(Shahizah Ismail Hamdan and Ravichandran Vengadasamy, 2006)

Shahizah Ismail Hamdan, and Ravichandran Vengadasamy , (2006) Herland and Charlotte Perkin Gilman's Utopian Social Vision of Women And Society. e-BANGI: Jurnal Sains Sosial dan Kemanusiaan, 1 (1). pp. 1-8. ISSN 1823-884x

TAGS

191520th centuryallegorical displacementsallegory • Aryan women • asexual reproduction • biplane • Charlotte Perkins Gilman • critiquedystopian science fiction • expedition party • fantastical • feminist • feminist classic • feminist critique • Forerunner (magazine) • gender politics • held captive • Herland (1915) • human reproduction • ideal social order • imaginary worldsinfluential worksisland • isolated society • LibriVox • masculinity • moral speculation • motherhoodnovel • parthenogenesis • power • public domain audiobook • reimagined • revolutionary world • sci-fiscience fictionscience fiction fantasyshort storysocial constructionismsocial orderingsocietyspeculative fiction • uncharted land • utopia • utopian novel • what ifwomen

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 FEBRUARY 2013

Claude Monet's Ultraviolet Eye

"Late in his life, Claude Monet developed cataracts. As his lenses degraded, they blocked parts of the visible spectrum, and the colors he perceived grew muddy. Monet's cataracts left him struggling to paint; he complained to friends that he felt as if he saw everything in a fog. After years of failed treatments, he agreed at age 82 to have the lens of his left eye completely removed. Light could now stream through the opening unimpeded. Monet could now see familiar colors again. And he could also see colors he had never seen before. Monet began to see--and to paint--in ultraviolet."

(Carl Zimmer, 16/04/2012)

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TAGS

1915blindness • cataracts • Claude Monetcolourcolour and light • colour frequency • colour tones • declining vision • eye surgery • eyes • foggy • French painter • impressionism • impressionistic personal world • light • light frequency • light sensitivity • meticulous observation • muddier • nuclear cataracts • optical effectpainterperception of reality • perceptual abnormalities • pigment • ultraviolet color patterns • ultraviolet colour • ultraviolet light • ultraviolet sensitivity • ultraviolet vision • UV • visible light • visible spectrum • visionvisual distortionvisual perception • visual problems • wavelength

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 DECEMBER 2012

Kazimir Malevich: non-representational, non-painterly abstractions

"In the early twentieth century, Suprematism represented a leap into a totally non–representational, non–painterly, tarantella–like dynamic. Basic geometric shapes, isolated or in groups, were being energized, propelled into an optimistic ideal soaring from lower left to upper right, the vector alone suggesting time. The limits of perception and understanding are being questioned. An aura of simultaneous ecstatic concentration and idolatry of the will pervades these works.

Experienced 'in flesh,' these formidable abstractions look 'humanized': slight wavings in texture and color, the crackled paint of the Black Square on white, the subtlest of whites upon off–whites, transport the viewer into a higher, supremely charged, inspirational state of mind."

(Ileana Marcoulesco, Art Lies)

Fig.1 Kazimir Malevich (1915) "Black Circle", "Black Cross" and "Black Square"

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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