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25 FEBRUARY 2015

Build your own (smartphone enabled) cardboard Oculus Rift

"In the past week or so, you've probably heard about Google Cardboard, Google's lovably wry answer to the Oculus Rift. The Rift, of course, is a gadget that has gotten millions of dollars in funding and a multi–billion dollar Facebook buyout, and will cost hundreds of dollars at launch. Google Cardboard is a piece of cardboard with a couple of special lenses and a place to put a smartphone. Snickers and high fives were no doubt had.

The cool thing is that Google Cardboard is no joke—the rig actually provides a virtual reality experience when you use it with a smartphone and the Cardboard app. Well, now you can get a knock–off cardboard VR rig, and yes, we're living in a time when that's a real thing."

(Helena Stone, 30 September 2014, Chip Chick)

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2014accessible designassembly instructionscardboard • Cardboard app • cardboard headset • CardboardSDK iOS • Chrome VR Experiments • Damien Henry • David Coz • DIYDIY craftsfolded paper designfreely available • Google Cardboard • Google Cardboard SDK • Google I/O • head-tracking • head-worn display • headset • immersionimmersive experience • immersive virtual reality • iOS 8 • magnetometer • mobile VR headset • Oculus Rift • open development • OpenGLschematic diagramsmartphonestereoscopic • stereoscopic display software • ultra-low-techvirtual realityvirtual reality experienceVRVR headsetwearable devicesWebGL

CONTRIBUTOR

Mik Parsons
19 OCTOBER 2012

3D Lenticular: the evolution of the gif

"Brooklyn–based trio The Saline Project are best known for creating music videos for the likes of Eminem, 50cent, and The Cure. Now a new art project sees them looking to evolve the gif format to something they're calling 3D lenticular…"

(Gavin Lucas, 25 July 2012)

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3d gif • 3d gifs • 3D lenticular • 50 Centalienanimated gifanimation • Eminem • ghostGIFGIF artistsGIF format • halloween • lenticular imagery • Loch Ness Monster • monster • MVHV • spooky • stereographic • stereophotographystereoscopic • swamp monster • The Cure • The Saline Project • vampire • wolfman

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 JANUARY 2012

Film Fading to Black: ARRI, Panavision and Aaton have quietly ceased production of film cameras

"While the debate has raged over whether or not film is dead, ARRI, Panavision and Aaton have quietly ceased production of film cameras within the last year to focus exclusively on design and manufacture of digital cameras. ...

'The demand for film cameras on a global basis has all but disappeared,' says ARRI VP of Cameras, Bill Russell, who notes that the company has only built film cameras on demand since 2009. 'There are still some markets––not in the U.S.––where film cameras are still sold, but those numbers are far fewer than they used to be. If you talk to the people in camera rentals, the amount of film camera utilization in the overall schedule is probably between 30 to 40 percent.'

At New York City rental house AbelCine, Director of Business Development/Strategic Relationships Moe Shore says the company rents mostly digital cameras at this point. 'Film isn't dead, but it's becoming less of a choice,' he says. 'It's a number of factors all moving in one direction, an inexorable march of digital progress that may be driven more by cell phones and consumer cameras than the motion picture industry.'

Aaton founder Jean–Pierre Beauviala notes why. 'Almost nobody is buying new film cameras. Why buy a new one when there are so many used cameras around the world?' he says. 'We wouldn't survive in the film industry if we were not designing a digital camera.'

Beauviala believes that that stereoscopic 3D has 'accelerated the demise of film.' He says, 'It's a nightmare to synchronize two film cameras.' Three years ago, Aaton introduced a new 35mm film camera, Penelope, but sold only 50 to 60 of them. As a result, Beauviala turned to creating a digital Penelope, which will be on the market by NAB 2012. 'It's a 4K camera and very, very quiet,' he tells us. 'We tried to give a digital camera the same ease of handling as the film camera.'

Panavision is also hard at work on a new digital camera, says Phil Radin, Executive VP, Worldwide Marketing, who notes that Panavision built its last 35mm Millennium XL camera in the winter of 2009, although the company continues an 'active program of upgrading and retrofitting of our 35mm camera fleet on a ongoing basis.'

'I would have to say that the pulse [of film] was weakened and it's an appropriate time,' Radin remarks. 'We are not making film cameras.' He notes that the creative industry is reveling in the choices available. 'I believe people in the industry love the idea of having all these various formats available to them,' he says. 'We have shows shooting with RED Epics, ARRI Alexas, Panavision Genesis and even the older Sony F–900 cameras. We also have shows shooting 35mm and a combination of 35mm and 65mm. It's a potpourri of imaging tools now available that have never existed before, and an exciting time for cinematographers who like the idea of having a lot of tools at their disposal to create different tools and looks.'"

(Debra Kaufman, 2011, Creative COW)

Fig.1 The Xterà by Aaton (Super16 camera with film magazine).

Fig.2 The Penelope–Delta by Aaton (digital camera with internal full resolution recorder).

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16mm200935mm • 35mm camera • 4K • 4K camera • 65mm • Aaton • AbelCine • ARRIARRI Alexascameracamera-making businesscelluloidcinemacinematographer • consumer cameras • creative industries • demise of film • devicedigitaldigital cameradigital cinematographydigital filmmakingdigital progressDSLR • ease of handling • feature filmfilmfilm camerafilm industryfilm makingfilmmaking • Jean-Pierre Beauviala • motion picture industry • obsolescencePanavision • Panavision Genesis • radical innovationRED Epic • Sony F-900 • stereoscopic • Super16 • technology innovation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 FEBRUARY 2010

360 Panoramic Video Capture and Recording

"You have probably seen several times in the past, those immersive digital photographs in which you can easily look up and down and turn your vision all around in full 360° glory. The 360° panoramic new year's eve of 2003 in Times Square, New York, has been one of my first memorable favorites, as it captures so well the thousands of emotions and different people celebrating on the street at once.

But video technology is now surpassing even these spectacular capabilities, by delivering navigable 3D, immersive video which as good or better than the 360° navigable images you and I have seen until now.

Check this video out. Once it starts rolling, click and move your mouse in different directions. You will be surprised to see that you can now fully navigate also inside moving video images.

The visual impact is really quite shocking, especially if, this is the very first time you are in front of a 3D, immersive and fully navigable video.

This spectacular feat is achieved by utilizing eleven video streams arranged according in a geodesic fashion. By doing so it is possible to capture an almost complete spherical image; a high–resolution 360 degree view of surroundings that is seamlessly stitched together.

Immersive navigable 3D movies can integrate GIS coordinates and other metadata to create highly informative, educational or life–saving emergency and assistance video guides.

The company behind this impressive new media technology is Immersive Media Corp., based in Calgary, Canada. The company also owns the wholly–owned subsidiary Immersive Media Company, based in Portland, Oregon.

The dodecahedron, with its twelve symmetrical pentagonal facets, is the most natural geometric division of a sphere for immersive image capture. It offers symmetrical, standardized divisions of the sphere that make the most of the image produced by each lens, and produces even resolution in every direction, better blending of the images, and more even illumination of the overall scene.

Perfectly equal and parallel faces, edges and corner angles, and divisions according to the Golden Ratio: A/B=(A+B)/A

It is the most natural geometric division of a sphere for immersive video image capture. It produces:

The enormous number of pixels recorded enables the highest image quality in every direction. The result is consistent image resolution across the entire spherical frame, with photographic realism and full motion.

Over 100 million pixels per second are recorded, resulting in spherical frames of 2400x1200 pixels, 30 frames per second. With the Telemmersion System, software is not required to correct sub–standard image resolution.

Images may be viewed spherically using the IMViewer software for looking around, or in an overall panoramic sphere movie format utilizing standard video playback platforms such as Windows Media® Player or QuickTime®."

(Edited by: Luigi Canali De Rossi)

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360 degree view360 degrees3D • Calgary • Canadadigital photographydodecahedrongeodesicGISgolden ratioimage captureimmersionimmersive • immersive image capture • Immersive Media Company • immersive photography • immersive video • IMViewer software • navigable 3D • navigable images • new media technology • New YorkOregonpanorama • panoramic sphere • photographic realismphotographyPortland (Oregon)QuickTimespectacle • spherical • stereoscopic • symmetrical • Telemmersion System • Times Squarevideo • video playback platforms • video technology • visual impact • Windows Media Player

CONTRIBUTOR

Suttana Keyuraphan
07 JANUARY 2010

Avatar: selective rather than deep focus stereoscopic cinematography

James Cameron: "I think it's a myth that you want deep focus in 3–D shots. I find the opposite is true. Selective focus, created by working at low f–stops with longer lenses, evolved as a cinematic technique to direct the audience's attention to the character of greatest narrative importance at a given moment. With 3–D, the director needs to lead the audience's eye, not let it roam around the screen to areas which are not converged. So all the usual cinematic techniques of selective focus, separation lighting, composition, etc., that one would use in a 2–D film to direct the eye to the subject of interest, still apply, and are perhaps even more important. We all see the world in 3–D. The difference between really being witness to an event vs. seeing it as a stereo image is that when you're really there, your eye can adjust its convergence as it roves over subjects at different distances. Convergence is the natural toe–in that the eye does to align the left and right eye images of objects at specific planes of depth. In a filmed image, the convergence was baked in at the moment of photography, so you can't adjust it. In order to cut naturally and rapidly from one subject to another, it's necessary for the filmmaker (actually his/her camera team) to put the convergence at the place in the shot where the audience is most likely to look. This sounds complicated but in fact we do it all the time, in every shot, and have since the beginning of cinema. It's called focus. We focus where we think people are most likely to look. So I've found that just slaving the convergence function to the focus works exceedingly well, and makes good stereo a no–brainer on the set."

(David S. Cohen, 10 April 2008, Variety Magazine)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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