Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Sovereignty' keyword pg.2 of 2
14 APRIL 2010

If there is anywhere in the post-colonial world where two cultural worlds truly live an engaged life alongside each other, it's in New Zealand

"The 1840 Treaty of Waitangi which, in usual imperial style, seized sovereignty from the Maori and laid it at the feet of Queen Victoria did so on condition that their property rights and political and cultural integrity were respected. Needless to say in the generations that followed, this pact was respected more in the breach than the observance, but New Zealand history did follow its own extraordinary course.

In their first wars against violations of Waitangi the Maori effectively won the battle with the pakeha. Decimated by imported diseases for which they had no immunity, the Maori were expected, at the turn of the 20th Century to be on their way to extinction or extreme marginalisation like native Americans or Australian aborigines. Nothing of the sort has happened.

Today they constitute – by one count – almost 20% of the population and astonishingly a special tribunal created in the 1970s has been ruling on land claims dating back to the post–Waitangi years. Maori and the descendants of intermarriages that go back deep into the 19th Century, are to be found in every leading walk of life in the country.

Of course there have been serious problems of unequal social opportunity, of street gangs. But if there is anywhere in the post–colonial world where two cultural worlds truly live an engaged life alongside each other, it's in New Zealand."

(Simon Schama, 9 April 2010, BBC News)

Fig.1 Warwick Freeman, 1992. Tiki Face

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TAGS

18401970s19th centuryAborigineAotearoa New ZealandAustralasiaAustralian AborigineCommonwealthcultural heritage • cultural integrity • diseaseextinction • gangs • historyIndigenous • intermarriage • land claims • MaorimarginalisationNative Americans • Newstralia • Pakeha • political integrity • postcolonial • Queen Victoria • settlement • social opportunity • sovereigntyTe Tiriti o Waitangitiki • tribuna

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JULY 2008

Maori art education: hybrid or essentialist praxis?

"While this amalgam of identities may be construed as a hybrid persona, my practice both as artist and educator cannot be construed in this manner since a hybrid identity propounds an anti–essentialist critique of aesthetics and cultural identity. While it has been argued that hybridity as a subject position is more in keeping with the shifting realities of identity construction and border crossings of the trans–global present I find its indeterminate nature and its recourse to 'mimicry' problematic. Homi Bhabha has re–conceptualised hybridity as the 'Third Space', a space in between subject positions that is "an ambivalent site where cultural meaning and representation have no 'primordial unity or fixity'". It should come as no surprise that the ambivalent and tenuous nature of the Third Space has a post–structuralist essence in which '[t]he "nomadism" of "unhomeliness" [has become] a new norm which [has] displaced the sovereignty of national cultures and a universal human culture'. While there are problems with hybridity it seems plausible as an ideological position particularly for diasporic populations who must necessarily articulate their identities within another space that is not their own. "
(Robert Jahnke, Victoria University of Wellington, NZ)

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TAGS

ambivalent site • Aotearoa New Zealand • Bhabha • culturediasporahybridityidentity • Janke • Korotangi Series 5 • Maori • Ornsby • post-structuralismpraxissovereigntythird spacetransglobal

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 MAY 2007

Status Quo solution for Jerusalem

"Sharing sovereignty of political territory is not practiced often, yet it seems to be the only reasonable solution for the complex issue of Jerusalem. Using the holy places of Jerusalem as a model, the author shows how sharing sacred space, albeit on a very small scale, can be done peacefully. For more than a century Greeks, Latins, Armenians, and Copts have shared the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in an interlocking system of scattered sovereignty. Such a system also could work between Israelis and Palestinians as they share the sacred space of Jerusalem.
...
If Israel continues to maintain control over all the land of Israel/Palestine, of course, then there is no need to discuss sharing Jerusalem. But in anticipation of the day when there most likely will be some form of Palestinian entity in existence side–by–side with Israel, and knowing that both peoples claim the city as holy and as their capital, then somehow the two nations have to agree on how to share the city. Ideally, the Israelis and Palestinians should sit down and demarcate control, because they are the ones who best know the facts on the ground. Given the imbalance of power between the two parties, however, perhaps the United Nations or the United States could play the role of arbitrator, like the Ottomans did in the past."
(Chad F. Emmett)

Chad F. Emmett (1997). 'The Status Quo Solution for Jerusalem.' Journal of Palestine Studies 26(2).

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TAGS

Al-Aqsa Mosque • autonomy • Church of the Holy Sepulchre • civil rights • Emmett • Haram esh-Sharif • holy • interlocking • IsraelJerusalemJewmosaicMuslimnationOttoman Empire • Ottomans • PalestinianpeacesacredshareSolomonsovereigntytempleterritorytoleranceUnited Nationsviolence
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