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Which clippings match 'Sony' keyword pg.1 of 2
22 OCTOBER 2012

Timeline illustration of 1000 names of Sony Music artists since 1887

"Sony Music has unveiled a graphic installation documenting the company's 125 year musical history. Designed by Alex Fowkes, winner of Creative Review's 'One to Watch' in 2011, the Sony Music Timeline runs throughout the central atrium of Sony's open plan Derry Street offices.

The Installation features nearly 1000 names of artists signed to Sony Music and its affiliated labels from the foundation of Columbia Records in 1887 to the present day, including musical icons Elvis Presley, Jimi Hendrix, Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Janis Joplin, The Clash, Micheal Jackson and many many more.

Interspersed among the artist names are certain key developments in technology, musical formats and corporate history – from the invention of early recording cylinders to vinyl, cassette, CD, radio, MTV, the Sony Walkman, the iPod and the introduction of digital streaming services.

The work is organised by decade into 54 columns measuring over 2 meters tall and covering almost 150 square meters of wall space. It uses CNC cut vinyl as the sole medium for the whole installation.

Emma Pike, VP Industry Relations, who commissioned the piece said, 'The brief was to bring the inspiration of our music into the heart of our building and make our office space live and breathe our incredible musical legacy. Alex's beautiful graphics and illustrations do exactly that.'

Sony's partnership with Fowkes is set to continue as the Sony Music Timeline will grow each year with the addition of new artist names signed by the major.'"

(Sony Music, 2012)

Sony Music Timeline Process Video, Design & Art Direction: Alex Fowkes Photography & Video: Rob Antill, Music Production: Joseph Bird.

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125 years • 18872012 • Alex Fowkes • analogue and digital formatsBob DylanBruce SpringsteencassetteCD • Columbia Records • consumer electronicscorporate historyCreative Review (magazine)design innovation • developments in technology • digital streamingdigital technologyearly recording technologyElvis Presley • Emma Pike • graphic illustrationhistoryhistory of information technologyhistory of recording technologyinformation designiPod • Janis Joplin • Jimi Hendrix • Lex Media • Michael JacksonMTV • music artist • music artsmusic formatmusic history • musical legacy • Paul Sexton • pioneering technologyposter illustrationproduct designradio • recording cylinder • Rob AntillSonySony MusicSony Walkmantechnology convergenceThe Clashtimelapsetimelinevinyl record

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 NOVEMBER 2010

NEX-5 Sony SEL18200 (18-200mm) Zoom lens

"The build quality of the Sony 18–200mm OSS is excellent. In a sea of cheap plastic extreme zoom lenses it really stands out with its stylish metal body and everything is tightly assembled. The focus ring operates exceptionally smooth. The lens has no focus distance indicator/window. The rubberized zoom ring turns smooth but it's also bit stiff which also helps to suppress zoom creeping. The lens has a duo–cam design so it uses two inner lens tubes to extend the lens towards longer focal lengths. The front element does not rotate so it's suitable for using polarizers. A lens hood is also part of the package. ...

The Sony E 18–200mm f/3.5–6.3 OSS is a refreshingly different approach compared to most of the competition. It's not a purposely under–designed lens for cost–cutting measurements. This is most obvious with respect to its build quality – the stylish metal body clearly stands out from the rest of the crowd and it's a joy to handle it in the field despite the somewhat unusual/odd proportions compared to the tiny NEX camera. The optical quality is on a very decent level. It is not a flawless lens, of course, but the resolution figures are very fine in the lower portion of the zoom range and still good beyond. The distortion characteristic is about average for a lens in this class. The Sony lens produces a surprisingly low amount of vignetting even at 'large' aperture settings (even in RAW images). The primary weakness of the lens are the lateral CAs at 18mm and 200mm although that's also rather typical for such lenses. The Sony lens is a pretty obvious choice for those seeking a one–lens–solution. The resulting package size may not be pocketable but, to be honest, neither is the 18–55mm f/3.5–5.6 OSS. The 18–200mm f/3.5–6.3 OSS is not a cheap lens (neither is e.g. the Panasonic 14–140mm OIS) but it's worth it ... if you can find a decent sample."

(Klaus Schroiff, http://photozone.de)

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18-200mm • 18-200mm OSS • 2010 • build quality • camera • compact system camera • deviceDSLRE-mount • E-Mount lens • Lens • NEX seriesNEX-5 • optical quality • Optical Steady Shot • OSSphotography • SEL18200 • SonySony AlphaSony NEX series • Sony SEL18200 • telephoto • telephoto zoom • unboxing • vignetting • zoom lens

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 SEPTEMBER 2010

Sony NEX-5K: an exceptionally small yet powerful hybrid camera

"Sony has designed and built an exceptionally small yet powerful hybrid camera which delivers image quality to match a digital SLR's, combined with full HD movies, the excellent Sweep Panorama mode (with a 3D firmware upgrade coming soon), high–speed shooting and more. It's a great little camera"

(Marcus Hawkins 25th August 2010, PhotoRadar)

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14.2 MP • 18-55mm • 2010 • AVCHD • camera • CMOS APS • convergencedevicedigitaldigital camera • digital SLR • DSLRE-mountHD • hybrid camera • industrial design • megapixel • MILC • Mirrorless Interchangeable-Lens Camera • NEX seriesNEX-5 • NEX-5K • OSSpanorama • PASM • photography • pocket camera • productproduct designRAW files • SEL16F28 • SEL1855 • SonySony AlphaSony cameraSony NEX series • Sweep Panorama • technologyvideo camera

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 JULY 2010

70 Billion Pixels Budapest: 360 degree panorama image

"The observation tower of János–hegy [the Elizabeth Lookout on János Hill is], the highest vantage point of Budapest with a 360 degree panorama, was an obvious location. It also allowed us to take on previous world records in both the 'highest definition image' and the 'largest spherical panorama' category. When contacted, the Council of District XII informed us on the upcoming anniversary of the tower. We agreed to cooperate in commemorating the September 2010 event by setting up new world records–give them our best shot if you please. ."

(360systems Ltd., 360world.eu)

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2010 • 70 Billion Pixels Budapest • anniversaryauthenticityBudapestcameradeviceEarth • Elizabeth lookout tower • environmentEpsonfidelity • gigapixel photography • high definitionHungaryimmersionimmersive • Janos Hill • locationMicrosoft • observation tower • panoramaphotophotographyrealism • September 2010 • Sonyspectacle • spherical panorama • technologytowervisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 JULY 2010

SMS Sugar Man: the first feature film shot entirely on a cell phone

"Aryan Kaganof's SMS Sugar Man has either the dubious or celebratory distinction – depending on your point of view of these kinds of things – of being the first feature film shot entirely on a cell phone, specifically the Sony Ericsson W900i. Given the film's strong sexual content, Sony probably won't be championing the film any time soon. But, in their absence, I will.

To Kaganof's grand credit, the technique in which the film was shot never comes across as being gimmicky. The majority of the movie is shot as any traditional movie is shot despite the unique camera being used. Every once in awhile we do get a direct POV shot from one of the characters holding his or her own camera, but this is used very sparingly and is thus unobtrusive.

Scenes are mostly lit and executed as if filmed with a traditional camera. What's most surprising about the movie is that one might presuppose – or, at least I did – that it would be comprised of mostly quick cuts. I don't own a cell phone with a camera, but I had assumed one of them could only hold small files for short scenes. Against expectation, Kaganof comprises SMS Sugar Man with fairly longish shots and gives the film a very lyrical tempo."

(Mike Everleth, 17 November 2008)

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2008 • Aryan Kaganof • authorshipcameracameraphonecell phonedigital camerafeature filmfilmfilm makinghybrid formsinnovationmediumminiaturisationmobile filmmakingmobile phonemoviePOVre-purposesex • SMS Sugar Man • Sony • Sony Ericsson W900i • techniquevisual communicationvisual designvisualisation • W900i

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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