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Which clippings match 'Michael Gove' keyword pg.1 of 1
22 SEPTEMBER 2016

Examples of parody video remixes using omission

Bush: 2004 State of the Union Remix; Obama State Of The Union remix; OBAMA State of the Union Address 2014 - (PARODY); Palin's Breath; Donald Trump's sniffling and heavy breathing; David Cameron's Conservative Party Conference Speech 2012 [Disrupted]; Nigel Farage and Independence day SPOOF!; Cassetteboy vs The News; Cassetteboy vs The Bloody Apprentice; Jeremy Corbyn's nuclear u-turn and David Cameron's approach to poverty | Cassetteboy remix the news; The Queen responds to Brexit | BREAKING.

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TAGS

200420122014Alan SugarBarack Obama • Boris Johnson • Brexit • Buckingham Palace • Cassetteboy • cleaner • conference speech • Conservative partyDavid CamerondisruptionDonald TrumpEuropean UnionGeorge W Bush • heavy breathing • hyperbole • Independence Day (1996) • Jeremy CorbynLiberal DemocratMichael GoveNigel Farage • nuclear proliferation • omissionparodyparody rebootparody versionparody video remixesplaying against type • political meltdown • povertyPrince Charles • Queen Elizabeth II • reboot • referendum • remixesrepurposing • Sarah Palin • sniff • sniffing • sniffle • spoofState of the Union • taken out of context • The Apprentice (UK TV series)tv news • u-turn • UK EU membership referendum • UKIP • upstagingvacuum cleanervideo compositingvideo remixvs

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 DECEMBER 2012

Neville Brody: removal of design from school curriculum is 'insanity'

"plans to remove creative subjects from the UK curriculum are 'short–sighted insanity', according to incoming D&AD president Neville Brody (+ interview).

Speaking to Dezeen, Brody described government plans to overhaul the curriculum as 'one of the biggest mistakes in British government' and added: 'The UK government is trying to demolish and smash all ideas about creative education.'

In September, education secretary Michael Gove announced plans to replace GCSE examinations for students up to the age of 16 with a new English baccalaureate (EBacc) system. Creative subjects such as art and design will not count towards the EBacc qualifications, which instead are graded on performance in academic 'stem' subjects. These stem subjects are English, mathematics, history or geography, the sciences and a language. ...

'The creative industries need high–quality creative graduates. If we're not getting the graduates, we're not going to sustain the industry,' said Brody. 'Creative services as a percentage of GDP is higher here than any other country, so why would you not want to support, promote and build that?'"

(Dezeen, 26 November 2012)

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TAGS

2012Andrew Marrart and designart schools • arts students • British Government • creative education • creative graduates • creative industriescreative professionscreative servicescreative subjectsD and ADdesign curriculumDezeenEBacceducation budgetEnglish BaccalaureateGCSE • GDP • graphic design agency • Michael GoveNeville Brody • non-UK students • overseas students • Research Studios (agency) • Royal College of Art • school of communication • skilled dangerous minds • STEM • studying arts • UKUK Governmentvisual design

CONTRIBUTOR

Chris Treweek
02 DECEMBER 2012

Billy Bragg: 'education reforms risk stifling creativity'

"Singer Billy Bragg has warned that the government's education reforms risk stifling creativity and leaving the pop charts the preserve of a well–off public school elite.

Bragg used a lecture in memory of broadcaster John Peel in Salford to criticise education secretary Michael Gove's plans to scrap GCSEs in favour of an English baccalaureate. He also turned his ire on and 'culture–clogging shows' such as Simon Cowell's The X Factor on ITV1.

The singer and leftwing activist said the government's proposed new education system threatened to exclude creative subjects from the core qualifications expected of 16–year–olds.

'At a time of cuts to the education budget, the pressure on schools to dump subjects like music and drama in favour of those that offer high marks in performances tables will only grow,' said Bragg.

He criticised the 'insistence that knowledge is more important than creativity', adding: 'As Albert Einstein said, imagination is more important than knowledge, for knowledge is limited while imagination embraces the whole world'.

Bragg, delivering the second annual John Peel Lecture at the Radio Festival on Monday, said: 'Under the English baccalaureate, with its reliance on a single end of course exam, the child with the creative imagination will always lose out to the child with the ability to recall knowledge learned by rote."

(John Plunkett, 12 November 2012, The Guardian)

Billy Bragg "John Peel Lecture", photograph: Andrew Stuart/Radio Festival/PR.

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TAGS

2012Albert Einsteinalgorithmic filtersart schools • Billy Bragg • coalition government • core subjects • creative arts • creative imagination • creative professionscreative subjectscreativitycriticism • culture-clogging • DIY ethicdramaeducation budgeteducation reform • education secretary • English Baccalaureateexamsfreedom of expressionGCSEimaginationITV1John Peel • John Peel Lecture • knowledge • learning by rote • leftwing activistMichael Govemusic • new education system • Notts Unsigned • performance tablesperformativitypolicy agenda • public school elite • Radio Festival • reality television • recall knowledge • rote learningSalford • Simon Cowell • singer • skiffle • Spotify • stifling creativity • X Factor

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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