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Which clippings match 'Social Theory' keyword pg.1 of 1
11 JUNE 2016

Digital Sociology: Beyond the Digital to the Sociological

"Where sociologists differ from many other social researchers in researching digital media is their awareness that digital data, like any other type of data, are socially created and have a social life, a vitality, of their own. They are not the neutral products of automatic calculation, but represent deliberate decisions by those who formulate the computer algorithms that collect and manipulate these data (boyd and Crawford 2012; Cheney-Lippold 2011; Ruppert et al. 2013). The data that these devices and software produce structure our concepts of identity, embodiment, relationships, our choices and preferences and even our access to services or spaces. Without the knowledge of digital technology users, algorithms measure and sort them, deciding what choices they may be offered (Beer 2009, 2013a). Algorithms and other elements of software, therefore, are generative, a productive form of power (Lash 2007)."

(Deborah Lupton, 2013, p.4)

Deborah Lupton 'Digital Sociology: Beyond the Digital to the Sociological', Paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association 2013 Conference, Monash University, 27 November 2013.

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TAGS

2013 • algorithms • cultural concept of technologycultural practicescultural technologycultural understanding of technologyculture and societyDanah Boyd • David Beer • Deborah Lupton • digital data • digital media • digital sociology • digital technologyembodiment • Evelyn Ruppert • identity • John Cheney-Lippold • Kate Crawford • material culturemediated interactionMonash Universitynew mediaScott Lashsocial mediasocial policysocial researchsocial theorysociology • sociomateriality • software affordancestechnology practicesUniversity of Sydney

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 JANUARY 2015

Emile Durkheim: social explanations

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TAGS

Barclay Johnson • collective consciousnessconsumerismdivision of labourEmile DurkheimFrederick Engelsglobalisation • Hans-Peter Muller • Imre Szeman • individualisminterdependence • Isabel Ortiz • James Henry • Karl Marxmacrosociology • Matthew Cummins • mechanical solidarity • modern organic solidarity • organic solidarity • Paul James • pre-modern mechanical solidarity • premodern • social explanations • social factssocial theoristsocial theorysociologist • solidarity • Tom Bottomore • Whitney Pope

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 MARCH 2013

Toward a Theory of Social Practices: A development in culturalist theorizing

"This article works out the main characteristics of 'practice theory', a type of social theory which has been sketched by such authors as Bourdieu, Giddens, Taylor, late Foucault and others. Practice theory is presented as a conceptual alternative to other forms of social and cultural theory, above all to culturalist mentalism, textualism and intersubjectivism. The article shows how practice theory and the three other cultural–theoretical vocabularies differ in their localization of the social and in their conceptualization of the body, mind, things, knowledge, discourse, structure/process and the agent."

(Andreas Reckwitz, 2002)

Andreas Reckwitz (2002). "Toward a Theory of Social Practices: A Development in Culturalist Theorizing", European Journal of Social Theory; Vol.5, No.2; pp. 243–263 DOI: 10.1177/13684310222225432 [http://est.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/5/2/243]

TAGS

2002 • Andreas Reckwitz • Anthony Giddens • background practices • bodily engagementbodyCharles Taylor • conceptual alternative • conceptualisation • cultural-theoretical vocabularies • culturalist mentalism • culturediscoursediscourse and practice • European Journal of Social Theory • interpersonal interactions • intersubjectivism • knowledge • mental representations • Michel Foucaultmind • mind and body • Pierre Bourdieu • practice theory • shared understandingsocial agency • social and cultural life • social and cultural theory • social theory • textualism • theory of things • things

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 FEBRUARY 2004

Online Community Developers Shape Digital Landscapes

"Like twentieth–century architects and town planners, online community developers shape digital landscapes, but successful online communities also need a purpose, people and policies. In millions of online communities people meet to debate baseball scores, compare child–birth experiences, get information about stocks, and ask for consumer advice. People create communities by their presence or absence, their behavior and personalities, and so do moderators and others with special roles. Developers can't control what people do but they can influence them by defining purposes and policies. Designing software that is consistent, predictable, easy to learn and supports how people want to interact has an impact too. Supporting social interaction (i.e., sociability) and human–computer interaction (i.e., usability) can produce thriving online communities instead of electronic ghost towns. Many developers design software, thinking they are designing communities. Meanwhile, keen–eyed, reflective sociologists describe the emergence of communities. But communities are neither designed nor do they just emerge. Like physical communities they evolve and change over time."

(Jenny Preece)

Seminar on People, Computers, and Design, Stanford University October 13, 2000

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TAGS

2000 • communities emerge • communities in cyberspacecommunitycommunity buildingcommunity design • designing communities • developers • digital landscapes • electronic ghost town • electronic ghost towns • emerge • evolve and change over time • evolving cultureevolving experienceHCIHMIJenny Preecelandscapeonlineonline communities • online community developers • physical communities • policy • reflective sociologists • reflective sociology • reflexivitysociabilitysocial interactionsocial theory • the emergence of communities • twentieth centuryusability
21 JANUARY 2004

Public Vs. Private As Strategies, Not Spaces

Leah A. Lievrouw
...the use of the public versus private contexts as strategies for handling difference or conflict. We relegate non–controversial information to public communication channels while we confine our controversial or disputable views to carefully segregated private forums where the possibility of challenge is minimised.Generally, we do not express certain biases, prejudices, or unpopular beliefs (or, if they are expressed, they are rhetorically bracketed as deviant) in a public context or medium (e.g., mass media, or to every member of an organisation via email). But we may express and even nurture these same beliefs in what we have come to think of as private media, where we can express such ideas (e.g., MUDs, religious television, talk radio, bulletin boards, fax networks).

TAGS

communication and culture • communication technologyconflictcontroversialdiscourse • heterotopic communication • information society • Lievrouw • privatepublicsocial theory • virtual culture
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