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Which clippings match 'Propinquity' keyword pg.1 of 1
19 OCTOBER 2015

Computer-Mediated Communication

"While computer-mediated communication use and research are proliferating rapidly, findings offer contrasting images regarding the interpersonal character of this technology. Research trends over the history of these media are reviewed with observations across trends suggested so as to provide integrative principles with which to apply media to different circumstances. First, the notion that the media reduce personal influences—their impersonal effects—is reviewed. Newer theories and research are noted explaining normative 'interpersonal' uses of the media. From this vantage point, recognizing that impersonal communication is sometimes advantageous, strategies for the intentional depersonalization of media use are inferred, with implications for Group Decision Support Systems effects. Additionally, recognizing that media sometimes facilitate communication that surpasses normal interpersonal levels, a new perspective on 'hyperpersonal' communication is introduced. Subprocesses are discussed pertaining to receivers, senders, channels, and feedback elements in computer-mediated communication that may enhance impressions and interpersonal relations."

(Joseph Walther, 1996)

Walther, J. (1996). "Computer-Mediated Communication: Impersonal, Interpersonal, and Hyperpersonal Interaction." Communication Research 23 February: 3-43.

TAGS

1996 • channel expansion theory • computer-mediated communication (CMC)computer-mediated interaction • cues-filtered-out • efficiency framework • electronic propinquity • electronic propinquity theory • experiential and perceptual CMC theories • face-to-face interaction • human behaviour in cyberspace • hyperpersonal model of CMC • interpersonal communication • interpersonal relations • Jochen Peter • Joseph Walther • Marjolijn Antheunis • media richness theory • mediated interactionnonverbal cues • Patti Valkenburg • propinquity • SIDE model • signaling theory • social identity model of deindividuation effects • social influence theory • social information processing (SIP) • social presence theory • teleconferencing research • videoconferencing • warranting • Yair Amichai-Hamburger

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 OCTOBER 2015

David Cross: A Question of Trust (visceral and embodied experience)

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TAGS

2015actions have consequencesaesthetic spectacleaffect theory • anecdote • anthropomorphismAustralian artistclaustrophobic spaces • concepts of affect • David Cross • Deakin Universitydisarmamentembodimentfeel thingshandlehold mehuman bodyhyper-sensualityinflatableinstallation sculptureintimate transaction • non visual art • phobia • playful spacepropinquitypublic artscopophiliasense of touch • sensory modalities • sensory phenomenashow (spectacle)social exchangespatial intimacytactile experienceTED Talks • TEDxDeakinUniversity • touch metrust • unguarded experience • visceral experiencevisceral journeyvisceral theorywe experience the world

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 NOVEMBER 2012

Psychical Distance: characters and situations in drama are unreal

"One of the best known examples is to be found in our attitude towards the events and characters of the drama; they appeal to us like persons and incidents of normal experience, except that that side of their appeal, which would usually affect us in a directly personal manner, is held in abeyance. This difference, so well known as to be almost trivial, is generally explained by reference to the knowledge that the characters and situations are 'unreal,' imaginary. In this sense Witasek, oeprating with Meinong's theory of Annahem, has described the emotions involved in witnessing a drama as Scheingefuhle, a term which has so frequently been misunderstood in discussions of his theories. But, as a matter of fact, the 'assumption' upon which the imaginative emotional reaction is based is not necessarily the condition, but often the consequence, of distance; that is to say, the converse of the reason usually stated would then be true: viz. That distance, by changing our relation to the characters, renders them seemingly fictitious, not that the fictitiousness of the characters alters our feelings toward them. It is, of course, to be granted that the actual and admitted unreality of the dramatic action reinforces the effect of Distance. But surely the proverbial unsophisticated yokel whose chivalrous interference in the play on behalf of the hapless heroine can only be prevented by impressing upon him that 'they are only pretending,' is not the ideal type of theatrical audience. The proof of the seeming paradox that it is Distance which primarily gives to dramatic action the appearance of unreliability and not vice versa, is the observation that the same filtration of our sentiments and the same seeming 'unreality' of actual men and things occur, when at times, by a sudden change of inward perspective, we are overcome by the feeling that 'all the world's a stage.'"

(Edward Bullough, 1912)

Edward Bullough (1912). "Psychical Distance" British Journal of Psychology, Vol. 5, pp. 87–117 (excerpt cited by Julie Van Camp, 22 November 2006).

Fig.1 Patricia Piccinini/Drome Pty Ltd. (2010) [http://leecasey.carbonmade.com/projects/2594595#9]

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TAGS

1912aesthetics • Alexius Meinong • all the worlds a stage • Annahem • appeal • appearance of unreliability • audiencebelievabilitybreaking the fourth wallchanging our relationcharactersdirect experience • distance • distanced viewpointdrama • dramatic action • dramatic space • Edward Bullough • emotionemotional immersionemotional involvementempathyfeelings • fictitious • fictitiousnessheld in abeyanceimaginary • imaginative emotional reaction • normal experience • only pretending • our sentiments • pathospersonalpropinquitypsychical distancepsychological closeness • psychological proximity • Scheingefuhle • Stephan Witasek • suspension of disbelief • theatrical audience • unreal • unreal characters • unreal situations • unreality • verisimilitude • witnessing • yoke

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 MARCH 2005

Dirty Pillows: Intimate But Detached

"Dirty Pillows is an interactive video installation which explores the need for intimate human companionship in a digital age. The user is invited to lie down on an empty bed next to a television monitor. Slowly, the screen awakes, leaving you face to face with a black and white image of a resting woman. Captured in a perpetually passive loop, her mesmerising gaze is interrupted only by slow, occasional blinking. Although Dirty Pillows lulls us into a state of emotional attachment to the screen, the clinical, sterile surrounds suggest the ultimate emptiness that tele–visual relationships offer."

(experimenta.org)

Sally Blenheim (2003). Dirty Pillows. Melbourne, Australia, Experimenta Media Arts.

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TAGS

2003Australian artist • detached • Dirty Pillows • Experimentaeye contactinstallationintimacy • physical closeness • physical intimacy • propinquitypsychological closeness • Sally Blenheim • spatial intimacytelevisualvideovideo artvideo artistvideo artworkvoyeurvoyeurismwatching
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