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Which clippings match 'Social Differentiation' keyword pg.1 of 1
06 OCTOBER 2012

A social mirror to the prevalence of casual homophobia on Twitter

"This website is designed as a social mirror to show the prevalence of casual homophobia in our society. Words and phrases like 'faggot,' 'dyke,' 'no homo,' and 'so gay' are used casually in everyday language, despite promoting the continued alienation, isolation and – in some tragic cases – suicide of sexual and gender minority (LGBTQ) youth.

We no longer tolerate racist language, we're getting better at dealing with sexist language, but sadly we're still not actively addressing homophobic and transphobic language in our society.

Let's put an end to casual homophobia. Speak out when you see or hear homophobic or transphobic language from friends, at school,

in the locker room, at work or online. Use #NoHomophobes to show your support. And visit one of our resource websites to get more involved."

(NoHomophobes.com)

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TAGS

#NoHomophobes • alienationcasual discrimination • casual expression • casual homophobia • casual reference • critiquecultural signalsdata analysisdykeeveryday • everyday language • faggotgay • gender minority • homo • homophobia • homophobic language • information designintoleranceisolation • LGBTQ • locker room • metrics • minority • mirror • no homo • NoHomophobes • racist languagerepresentationsentiment analysissexist language • sexual minority • so gay • social activismsocial changesocial commentsocial differentiation • social mirror • social normssocial responsibilitysuicide • transphobic • transphobic language • TwitterTwitter streamwords and phrasesyouth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 APRIL 2012

The amateur video which sparked the 1992 Los Angeles Civil Unrest

"in March 1991, television screens across the world broadcast [George Holliday's] videotaped footage of LAPD officers raining down 56 baton blows on an African American named Rodney King. ... on April 29, 1992, a jury in Simi Valley, one of the whitest exurbs of Los Angeles, acquitted three of the four officers involved in beating Rodney King. The response in South Los Angeles was loud and immediate: That night, thousands of residents, black and Latino, took to the streets, starting a four–day riot that destroyed more than 1,000 buildings, injured 2,500 people, killed 58, and resulted in $1 billion in damage and 16,000 arrests."

(Josh Sides, 19/04/2012, Design Observer)

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TAGS

19911992 • 1992 Los Angeles Civil Unrest • acquitted • African Americanamateuramateur cameraamateur videoarsonassault • baton • beating • brutalitybystandercitiescitizen journalismcivic engagementcivil disobediencecivil libertiescivil rights • civil unrest • damageethics • exurb • eyewitnessforce of law • George Holliday • high-speed pursuit • Hispanic • injusticejustice • LAPD • Latasha Harlins • Latino • looting • Los Angeles • Los Angeles Police Department • Los Angeles Riots • manslaughter • motoristmurderpolicepolice brutality • police officer • povertypower corrupts • property damages • real behaviourriot • rioted • riots • Rodney King • self-control • Simi Valley • social differentiationsocial responsibility • South Central Riots • suffering injustice • television report • unethical behaviourunjustunjust powervideotapedvideotaped footage

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 NOVEMBER 2009

Big Hair: A Wig History of Consumption in Eighteenth-Century France

"Historians of consumption have generally followed social theorists in emphasizing two different aspects of modernity. While social scientists emphasize long term processes of 'modernization,' such as urbanization and industrialization, cultural historians and literary critics define modernity in terms of consciousness, stressing in particular the development of a reflexive self and a heightened awareness of one's present age as new and set off from the past.(4) Both understandings of modernity underpin current historical literature on eighteenth–century Western European consumption. Highlighting socioeconomic processes of commercialization, historians argue that eighteenth–century Western Europe experienced a 'consumer revolution' as men and women freed themselves from the grip of scarcity to initiate a buying spree of historic proportions. Although its geography and periodization remain highly controversial, such a revolution is commonly represented as a step toward modern consumer society.(5) At the same time, the study of consumption, especially French consumption, has taken a cultural turn, opening new doors between the Enlightenment and late modernity. (6) Daniel Roche, whose work has defined the field, argues that the birth of consumption was an integral part of a larger cultural change in which the traditional values of a stationary Christian economy gradually gave way to the egalitarianism and individualism of modern commodity culture. For Roche, the story is principally one of emancipation: 'It is important to recognize that . . . commodities did not necessarily foster alienation; in fact, they generally meant liberation.'(7) The diffusion of fashion led to 'a new state of mind, more individualistic, more hedonistic, in any case more egalitarian and more free.'(8) Less optimistic than Roche but equally intent on establishing a connection between Enlightenment consumption and modernity, Jennifer Jones contends that the late–eighteenth–century discourse on fashion helped to produce modern, essentialized definitions of gender. As social differentiation faded from fashion commentary, gender differentiation took its place.(9)"

(Michael Kwass, p.633, The American Historical Review, 111.3)

Fig.1 FRONTISPIECE: Wigs. Encyclopédie, ou Dictionnaire raisonnée des sciences, des arts et des métiers. Recueil de planches, sur les sciences, les arts libéraux, et les arts méchaniques, avec leur explication, 11 vols. (Paris, 1762–1772), s.v. "Perruquier."

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TAGS

changecollaborationcommercialisationconsciousness • consumer revolution • consumer societyconsumerismconsumptioncostume design • cultural historian • Daniel Roche • egalitarianism • emancipationEuropean EnlightenmentfashionFrancegender differentiationgeographyhairhedonismhistoryindividualismindustrialisation • Jennifer Jones • late modernityliterary criticmodernisationmodernityperiodisation • reflexive self • social change • social constructionist • social differentiationsocietysocio-economictraditiontransformationurbanisation • Western Europe • wig

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 DECEMBER 2003

Urban Theory: the disintegration of social relationships into anomie

"Durkheim, writing towards the end of the nineteenth century, feared the disintegration of social relationships into 'anomie'. This constituted a situation where the norms and expectations surrounding behaviour were no longer known. The onset of industrialisation would create normlessness and social breakdown. He identified, as a key feature, the shift from a community based upon mechanical solidarity to one based upon organic solidarity. Mechanical solidarity was where the moral ideas and values of a society were shared by all members, collective authority was absolute and. deviants were not allowed. Conformity to the rules was expected of all the population and was enforced by strong sanctions. The basis of this form of solidarity was the homogeneity of moral beliefs across the population. In contrast, organic solidarity was based upon social differentiation and a key integrating role was played by the division of labour. The new form of solidarity was thus based upon the interdependence of specialised parts. Norms, rules and laws were organised, not around repression, but through contracts between individuals and groups which were legally binding and enforceable via the judiciary and court system. Stability and integration would be rebuilt on the basis of necessity. None of us could survive in the new industrialised urban world on our own; we all depended upon the activities of each other. The newsolidarity that Durkheim saw emerging came out of our diversity rather than being imposed by our homogeneity as it had been under 'mechanical solidarity'. He thus termed this new form of solidarity 'organic solidarity'."

(David C. Thorns, 2002, p. 23)

David C. Thorns (2002). "The Transformation of Cities", Palgrave Macmillan.

Durkheim, Émile. 1960. "The Division of Labour in Society". New York: Macmillian.

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