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Which clippings match 'Billboard' keyword pg.1 of 4
01 SEPTEMBER 2017

Truth In Advertising: Guerrilla Art in Santa Cruz 1980-1985

"The photographs in this exhibit are of actual altered billboards that appeared on the streets of Santa Cruz, California from 1980 to 1985. The photographs have been adjusted for brightness, contrast, and parallax, but no content changes were made.

The billboards were made over by a clandestine network of midnight billboard editors operating under the name of Truth In Advertising, or TIA for short.

This exhibit of their historic work was first presented in 2007 at the Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History. The exhibit is made up of 12 billboards presented in the order in which they appeared on the streets of Santa Cruz. The sequence also tells the story of Truth in Advertising, and documents publicity and commentary."

(Bob Stayton)

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1980sactivismadadvertising billboardsadvertising hijackingappropriation practicesbillboardbillboard bandit • Bob Stayton • critical cultural hijacking • culture jammingdetournement publicitaire • guerrilla art • guerrilla tacticsmedia hijacking • media reinterpretation • re-purposerecombinatory practiceridicule • Santa Cruz • transformative works • Truth in Advertising (TIA) • William Board (pseudonym)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 MARCH 2016

The Social Swipe: Charity Donation Billboard

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advertising conceptsadvertising displayadvertising in public spaces • animation sequence • awareness raisingbillboard • charity donation • creative advertisingcredit carddirect interactiondonationHamburg • interactive charity donation billboard • interactive displayinternational airport • Kolle Rebbe • Misereor • Misereor Social Swipe • mobile payment • placard • poverty and injustice • Sascha Hanke • Social Swipe • Spenden • swipingtangible advertising media

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 NOVEMBER 2015

Google trials DoubleClick enabled virtual out-of-home advertising

"Google has begun testing extending its DoubleClick ad technology beyond desktop computers and mobile phones to billboards.

The company is trialing a method for premium billboard ads to bought programmatically — using DoubleClick's automated processes, rather than having to manually place an order with an outdoor advertising company upfront — for the first time. ...

The idea is that passers-by will see the most relevant ads for the time of day and location they are in. If the passing audience isn't the right one to show an ad to, then the technology opts not to serve an ad.

Google's trial began earlier this month in London and will run until November. The ads are being served to premium digital screens in transport, roadside locations, and city centers across the UK. Google has bought the advertising placements upfront and is using DoubleClick to decide which ads for which of its brands are most appropriate to serve at particular locations and to determine the best time of day to display them."

(Lara O'Reilly, 30 October 2015, Business Insider)

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2015 • ad tech • ad technologyadvertising billboardsadvertising screensambient intelligenceautomated messagesbillboard • Business Insider Inc • Co:Collective (agency) • context awarenessdigital advertisingdigital advertising screensdigital billboardsdigital out-of-homedigital screensdigital signs • Essence (agency) • Euston Road • Google DoubleClick • Google Media Lab • GrandVisual • hypermediacyJCDecaux • London Waterloo Station • Ocean Outdoor • Old Street roundabout • OMD UK (agency) • OOH advertising • OOH media • OpenLoop • out of home advertising • out-of-home (OOH)outdoor advertising • Outdoor Plus • passer-bypervasive advertising • programmatic billboards • programmatic out-of-home advertisingproof of concept • R/GA (agency) • real-time advertising • Rubicon Project • Silicon Roundabout • Talon (agency) • targeted advertising • Tim Collier • TubeMogul • ubiquitous advertising • Vauxhall roundabout • virtual outdoor advertising • Xaxis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 JANUARY 2014

Interactive billboards that drop angels on your head

"There you are in the middle of the city, traffic all around, planes buzzing above and you notice a little boy on a giant screen pointing up. 'Look,' says the boy. And you look, and the on–screen boy is pointing at an actual plane flying in the sky. He knows its flight number, its destination. This is no joke. That is flight BA475 from Barcelona! He tracks its path with his little hand, and then, when the plane is gone, he dashes off. This is a British Airways display ad in London's Piccadilly Circus, and it's using to identify actual planes in the actual sky.

Digital billboards are stepping up their game. They are becoming . There's another stunning example at Euston Station (also in London) that shows a man furiously screaming at a woman who is clearly frightened. But you can help. If you have a cellphone, you can yank the man clear across the station, dragging him from screen to screen to screen until he's way on the other side of the terminal.

I've got one more. This time it's a fantasy experience available to anyone who steps into a marked spot in the middle of Victoria Station. (London's a happening place for billboard experimentation.) Once you're there, a holographic angel drops down from heaven and lands beside you. You can't see her in real space, but you and she are plainly visible on a screen that everybody in the station can see, and you are free to interact anyway you please."

(Robert Krulwich, 04 January 2014, NPR)

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2014advertising in public spacesaeroplaneangelawareness raisingbillboardboy • British Airways • cellphonecreative advertising • cute girl • digital billboardsdigital displaysdigital screens • display ad • domestic violence • e-motion screens • Euston Station • experience design • fantasy experience • flight number • flying • frighten • furious • get involvedholograph • interactive billboard • interactive digital displayinteractive displayinteractive installationinteractive screen • intervene • JCDecaux • London Victoria • Lynx Excite • manmobile phone • National Centre for Domestic Violence (NCDV) • NPROgilvy Group UK • Piccadilly Circus • pointing • public spacescream • screen to screen • sky • surveillance technology • train station • Victoria Station • visual communicationwoman

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 OCTOBER 2013

'Disappearing Palestine' Ads On TransLink Anger Jewish Groups

Charlotte Kates, a spokeswoman for seven Vancouver–based groups calling themselves the Palestine Awareness Coalition "said the images, which went up in Vancouver on Tuesday, show the steady occupation of Palestinian territory by Israel. The coalition got the idea for the 'Disappearing Palestine' campaign from similar ads that have run in American cities like New York, Seattle and San Francisco.

'We wanted to draw attention to and shed light on the ongoing human rights violations ... against Palestinians,' she said.

'The Canadian government has been such a strong voice in support of Israel ... so we think it's particularly important that people in Vancouver and other Canadian cities learn about what's happening in Palestine now and what's happened there historically.'

Jewish groups have declared strong opposition to the ads, which are displayed at a wall mural in a Vancouver SkyTrain station as well as on 15 buses, and have tried to have TransLink, a government agency, remove them."

(Kim Nursall, 28 August 2013, The Canadian Press)

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19462012ad campaignawareness raisingbillboard • billboard campaign • Canada • conflict narrative • controversy • Disappearing Palestine (campaign) • hegemonic discoursehegemony • incite hatred • IsraelIsraeli-Palestinian conflictJewish peoplemainstream mediamaps • media attention • Middle Eastoccupied territoriesoccupying power • Palestine Awareness Coalition • Palestinian cause • Palestinian territories • poster campaign • pro-Zionist groups • provocative attack • SkyTrain (Canada) • State of IsraelState of Palestineterritorial bordersterritorialisationterritoryThis Land Is Minetrain station • TransLink • Vancouver

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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