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Which clippings match 'Bruno Munari' keyword pg.1 of 1
30 JUNE 2013

Display: a collection of rare mid 20th century graphic design books

"Display is a curated collection of important modern, mid 20th century graphic design books, periodicals, advertisements and ephemera. Documenting, preserving and providing public access to these original materials will raise the profile of Graphic Design as a source of educational, historical and scholarly analysis for teachers, students, designers and independent researchers. From the rational to the experimental to the playful–our collection is varied and represents a distinct point of view about mid–century graphic design, typography and beyond."

(Patricia Belen and Greg D'Onofrio)

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TAGS

20th centuryadvertisement designadvertising designaestheticsAlan FletcherAlbe Steiner • Alberto Gennari • Aldo Calabresi • Alvin Lustig • Andreas His • Anthony Froshaug • Anton Stankowski • Antonio Boggeri • Atanasio Soldati • Attilio Rossi • Battista Pallavera • Ben Benn • Betoniere Magutt • Bob Noordabook cover designbook designBruno Munari • Carl Bernard Graf • Carlo Dradi • Carlo Pirovano • Carlo Vivarelli • Cinturato Pirelli • communication designcurated collectiondesign aestheticsdesign collectiondesign ephemeradesign for filmdesign formalism • Display (site) • Drei Mal Pro • Eckhard Jung • editorial design • Einladung • Elaine Lustig Cohen • Emil Ruder • Ennio Lucini • Enrico Bona • Enrico Kaneclin • Enzo Mari • Erik Nitsche • Eugenio Carmi • exhibition designformalist design aesthetics • Franco Grignani • Franco Maria Ricci • Fridolin Müller • Friedrich Vordemberge-Gildewart • Giancarlo Iliprandi • Giorgio Host-Ivessich • Giovanni Broggi • Giovanni Fraschini • Giovanni Frecchiami • Giovanni Pintori • Grafa International • graphic design • graphic design books • graphic design collectiongraphic design history • graphic design periodicals • Grete e Horacio Coppola • Gruetta Girevole • Guido Bergossi • Gyorgy Kepes • Hans Conrad • Hans Neuburg • Hardoy Chair • Heinz Waibl • Herbert Bayer • Herbert Kapitzki • Herbert Matter • Herman Miller Collection • Hermann Eidenbenz • HfG • Hiromu Hara • Hochschule fur Gestaltung • Horacio Coppola • Igildo Biesele • Ikko Tanaka • Ilio Negri • information design • Italo Zannier • Jan Tschichold • Jeder Dieser Drei • Josef Muller-Brockmann • Karl Gerstner • Ladislav Sutnar • layout design • Lester Beall • Lora Lamm • Luigi Minardi • Luigi Oriani • Luigi Veronesi • magazine artmagazine illustrationmagazine layout • Manfred Winter • Mario Perondi • Massimo Vignellimaterial cultureMax Bill • Max Huber • Michele Provinciali • mid 20th-century • Miglia di Monza • modern design • modern graphic design • modern graphic design collection • Morton Goldsholl • Nelly Rudin • Noel Martin • Otl Aicher • Pasquale Casonato • Paul Rand • Paul Renner • Paul Schuitema • Piero Gandolfi • Piet Zwart • Pino Tovaglia • Randolfo Asti • rare books • Raymond GFeller • Remo Muratore • Richard Paul Lohse • Robert Buchler • Roberto Sambonet • Roland Aeschlimann • Ryuichi Yamashiro • Schweizer Grafiker • Sepp Deimel • Siegfried Odermatt • Swiss Style • Tomas Gonda • Tonino Boschiroli • twentieth-century design • typographic art • typographyvisual communication • Walter Cyliax • Will Burtin • William Fleming • Wim CrouwelXanti Schawinsky • Yoshio Hayakawa • Yusaku Kamekura • Yves Zimmermann

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 NOVEMBER 2012

U+MAG: an independent Brazilian digital magazine

"In some religions, one must be baptized in water for a new, sinless person to emerge. Maybe that can unfold, in different ways, for a magazine like U+MAG, which is created from scratch every three months, sinless and clean – as I've said in past issues. And in life, it's sometimes crucial to be born again, everyday. But there is a baptism inside this edition, and it happened through images by Lucas Bori and Fernando Mazza. They are responsible (together with Cassia Tabatini, Daniel Malva, Tiago Chediak and Hugo Toni) for the pictures that act as breathers within this issue, which marks a transition to a new phase for the magazine. It is now divided between online (exclusive stories regularly posted on our website), mobile (iPad, iPhone and Android) and print (print on demand is the future!). This issue of U+MAG is special for another reason: it's our anniversary edition (but without golden, celebratory caps) and also because it celebrates in an unconventional way and running from stereotypes what an emerging nation can show the world. In this issue's opening pages, Bruno Munari's quote is the perfect translation for what we want to convey. Things that make our lives interesting. It's not as if the magazine has a message such as 'Yes, we have Bananas, and they are the world's best'. It's much more than that: we present Brazilian imagery outside of the tourist package that's usually spread around, specially when the country concerned is about to host a World Cup and the Olympics. But we treat it all ironically (e.g. the story shot by Vitor Pickersgill, inspired by the carioca piriguetes, a term for local, shamelessly clad girls) and poetically (such as the Iemanja 2.0, beautifully impersonated by Thais Custodio). If we focused the whole issue on Brazil, however, we would be closing ourselves to the world. And it goes against our principles. That's why the stories shot by our foreign collaborators are indispensable for U+MAG's universe. They are essential for our formula to work out. Our exaggerated, bold and visually ever changing spirit will remain intact. The covers, on the other hand, will suffer a redesign in 2013. A preview of that process is the cover of our special collector's issue–all to value photography and imagery. Besides, fresh air is always appreciated. A special thanks for all who were part of U+MAG's history so far, and hello for all newcomers, who believe in our work and our philosophy."

(U+MAG, 2012)

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2004 • a transition to a new phase • acid-free paper • Android OS • anniversary edition • bold • BrazilBrazilian • Brazilian imagery • Bruno Munari • carioca piriguetes • content formcreative people • digital magazine • emerging nation • exaggerated • exclusive online content • FIFA World Cup • HP Indigo digital press • independent publishersiPadiPhonemagazine • MagCloud • make our lives interesting • Olympicsprint on demandredesign • Rio 2016 • rising talents • stereotypes • tourist destination • U+MAG • verified recycled sources • visual communication • visual intact • web magazine • whats happening • whats next • whats past

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 NOVEMBER 2012

Technological advances expand the artist's expressive vocabulary

Exhibition: "Bruno Munari: My Futurist Past", Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art, 39A Canonbury Square, London, N1 2AN, From 19 September 2012 to 23 December 2012.

Bruno Munari was a "founding member of the Movimento Arte Concreta (M.A.C.) in Milan, which was established towards the end of the 1940s. This acted as a catalyst for new developments in Italian abstraction, and aspired to bring about a 'synthesis of arts' in which traditional painting would be complemented by new tools of communication, demonstrating the possibility of a convergence of art and technology, creativity and functionality. Reflecting his belief that technological advances expanded the artist's expressive vocabulary, by 1950 Munari had begun to experiment with creating works by means of projecting light through compositions made from a wide range of materials such as coloured and transparent plastic, organic elements and Polaroid filters, producing beautiful and intriguing images of vast dimensions."

(Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art, 2012)

Fig.1 Bruno Munari, Aeroplanes and Archers, 1932, mixed media, 34.8 x 24.8cms Courtesy Massimo & Sonia Cirulli Archive

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19071998artart and technologyartistBruno Munaricolour and lightConstructivist-inspiredconvergence • creativity and functionality • exhibitionexpressive vocabularyFuturism (art movement) • Futurist past • hanging mobile • hanging objects • Italian • Italian abstraction • Italian art • Milanmobilesmodernist tradition • Movimento Arte Concreta • new tools of communication • photomontagesculpturespatial environments • synthesis of arts • technological advances • transparent plastic • uncritical attitude towards progress • use of space • useless machinesworking across disciplines • working across media

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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