Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Dave Whitehead' keyword pg.1 of 1
17 FEBRUARY 2017

Acoustic signatures used in the sound design for Arrival (2016)

1

TAGS

2016 • acoustic signature • acoustics • Alan Murray • alien beings • alien vocals • Arrival (2016) • bagpipe • Bernard Gariepy Strobl • body physicality • Claire Pochon • Claude La Haye • Daniel Capeille • Dave Whitehead • Denis Villeneuve • extraterrestrial life • field recording • Gregory Vincent • heptapod vocals • kokako • Luc Raymond • Mathieu Beaudin • Michelle Child • Mimi Allard • Nicholas Becker • Nicolas Becker • Niels Barletta • Olivier Calvert • Olivier Guillaume • Patrick Rioux • physical body • physicality • Pierre-Jules Audet • rice paper • Simon Girard • sound design • sound designer • Stan Sakellaropoulos • Steven Ghouti • Sylvain Bellemare • tui • Valery Dufort-Boucher • White Noise Ltd

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 NOVEMBER 2012

The Hobbit: behind-the-scenes, Peter Jackson presents Video #9

Video #9 Published on YouTube 23 Nov 2012 by Peter Jackson (WingNut Films), Film premiere: 28 November 2012 (Wellington, New Zealand) Release Date: 13 December 2012 (UK)

1

TAGS

2012 • 48 fps • Abbey Road Studios • Alan Lee • Andrew Lesnie • animationAotearoa New Zealandbehind-the-scenes • Bilbo Baggins • Brent Burge • CGI • Chris Tomlinson • Chris Ward • Chris White • Christian Rivers • Christopher Boyes • colour grading • Dave Farmer • Dave Hollingsworth • Dave Whitehead • David Clayton • digital intermediate • Embassy Theatre • Eric Saindon • feature filmfilmmaking process • foley • HFR • High Frame Rate • Holly Acton • Jabez Olssen • Jed Brophy • Jerry Kung • John Howe • John Simpson • Karen Elliott • Kevin Sherwood • Lonely Mountain • making of • Marion Davey • Michael Semanick • motion capture • New Line Cinema • Park Road Post • Peter Cobbin • Peter Jacksonpost productionpre-visualisation • Raqi Sayed • SFXsound stage • The Hobbit • UKVFXWarner BrosWellingtonWeta Digital • Weta Workshops • WingNut Films

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 FEBRUARY 2004

A disturbing little film called A Little Death

"It's a long time since I've seen a film as genuinely disturbing as A Little Death. The title refers to the phrase 'un petite mort'. French slang for orgasm. This surreal film explores all the ambiguity of that phrase to devastating effect. A couple are making love. Or rather having sex – the hostility between them is palpable. The moment of climax flings them both into another dimension where the emotional savagery of their relationship is played out for real. Luscious colour photography gives way to crisp black and white, as Davison crashes through their bed into an identical room where everything, including her lover, is literally two–dimensional, bleached of life but tilled with an almost impersonal hatred. The tension that previously simmered beneath the surface is unleashed in images of extraordinary violence. Brophy, trapped in the 'wallpaper' of this unnatural room, can only scream as she takes her revenge. This ambitious script is well supported by its technically immaculate execution. It is tightly constructed, beautifully edited and the superb soundtrack is unusually effective, an integral part of the film rattler than (as too often happens) an afterthought. Much of the power of the film has to do with its purely visual logic, it didn't start to make sense to me until I stopped trying to figure out what was going on and just let the images wash over me. This is one of those rare films that can stand repeated viewings (providing you can) and serious philosophical debate, despite the fact its violent take on gender relations is more than a little disturbing. A Little Death is an uncommonly brave and passionate piece of filmmaking that stays in the mind long after it's been seen."

(Pavement magazine, 1995)

Fig.1 Simon Perkins and Paul Swadel (1994). "A Little Death", James Wallace Productions: 16mm, 11 minutes. [A Little Death externalises conflict between characters through the use of physical obstacles and camera perspectives. The film is an evolution of the "Into The Void" project.]
Fig.2 Natalie Robertson (1994). Josephine Davison is confused to find herself on a photocopied floor.

1
2

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.