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Which clippings match 'Independent Shops' keyword pg.1 of 1
20 JANUARY 2013

HMV's woes do not signal the end for record shops

"But, for once, the smaller independent retailers could be among the winners. Despite HMV's inability to make high street music retailing pay, many independent record shops are already reporting higher demand and sales, due partly to a backlash against Amazon's tax set–up and the difficulty of stumbling across unexpected gems online.

Stephen Godfroy, co–owner of Rough Trade, a chain of three London shops including a 500 sq m (5,000 sq ft) warehouse off Brick Lane, east London, said business is 'the best it's ever been' in the company's 36–year history. He said Rough Trade sales in the latest quarter were up 8% on the previous year and the company is in the process of launching a new online store and an outpost in Brooklyn, New York.

'UK music is in rude health, despite the woes of the last outdated chain of entertainment retailer,' he said. 'The collapse of HMV is sad but ultimately a necessary process of renewal that will result in a significantly brighter future for UK music consumers.'"

(Rupert Neate and Martha Thomas, 16 January 2013, Guardian News and Media Limited)

Fig.1 The Silent League [http://www.silentleague.com/] play in the intimate performance space at the back of Rough Trade [http://irocklondon.blogspot.co.uk/2010/07/vinyl–paradise–with–occasional–live.html].

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TAGS

Amazon.com • backlash • Brick LaneBrooklynchain storeeast London • entertainment retailer • high street music retailer • high street retailerHMV • independent record shops • independent retailersindependent shopsLondon • music consumer • music sales • New York • outdated chain • process of renewal • renewretailingRough Trade • rude health • salessimilitudeStephen Godfroystumbling acrosstax • The Silent League • UK • UK music • unexpected gems

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 MAY 2009

KiosKiosK: free retail space for new creative businesses

"Designers Wayne and Gerardine Hemingway MBE have today called for budding creative entrepreneurs to come forward to sell their products from 'KiosKiosK' – an innovative 'pop up shop' that will provide free temporary retail space for start–up businesses in central London this summer.

The first KiosKiosK – designed by the Hemingways and supported by the Mayor of London and the London Sustainable Development Commission's London Leaders programme – will be housed for two months (July to September 2009) outside London's iconic City Hall. It will offer rent–free space for people with creative products to sell such as ceramics, artworks, creative gifts and fashion, helping new businesses with great ideas to get a stepup on the ladder to success.

It is hoped that low cost 'pop up' shops of this kind will provide a template for London and towns and cities across the UK by offering a helping hand for businesses that may be priced out of high cost, high street and prime retail locations. This will also help to support smaller, independent shops increasing consumer choices.

The Hemingways started the famous Red or Dead brand from low cost 'easy in, easy out' starter units at Camden and Kensington Markets and Affleck's Palace in Manchester, but believe it has now become increasingly difficult for start up creative businesses to find affordable retail space."

(KiosKiosK press release, 27 May 2009, UK)

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TAGS

2009 • affordable retail space • consumer choicecreative businessescreative entrepreneurs • creative gifts • creative products • easy in easy out • Gerardine Hemingway • great ideas • helping new businesses • independent shopskiosk • KiosKiosK • little-bitty store • London Sustainable Development Commission • pop-up shop • prime locations • Red or Dead • rent-free • retail spacesmall businessesstart-up business • temporary retail space • the high street • UK • Wayne Hemingway

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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