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21 FEBRUARY 2014

Video Tutorial of OOP Design Patterns

Fig.1 Java Video Tutorial by Derek Banas, 19 August 2012.

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TAGS

data abstraction • Derek Banas • design patterns • encapsulation • inheritanceJavamodelling language • object class • object-oriented designOOP • OOP concepts • OOP design principles • programming fundamentals • requirements engineeringsoftware code • software design principles • software design problems • software developmentsoftware engineeringsoftware modellingsoftware programmingsoftware requirementssoftware tutorial • subclass • superclass • UML • UML diagram • Unified Modelling Languagevideo tutorial

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 MAY 2013

The talent myth: how to maximise your creative potential

"Most of us grow up being taught that talent is an inheritance, like brown hair or blue eyes. Therefore, we presume that the surest sign of talent is early, instant, effortless success, ie, being a prodigy. In fact, a well–established body of research shows that that assumption is false. Early success turns out to be a weak predictor of long–term success.

Many top performers are overlooked early on, then grow quietly into stars. This list includes Charles Darwin (considered slow and ordinary by teachers), Walt Disney (fired from an early job because he 'lacked imagination'), Albert Einstein, Louis Pasteur, Paul Gauguin, Thomas Edison, Leo Tolstoy, Fred Astaire, Winston Churchill, Lucille Ball, and so on. One theory, put forth by Dr Carol Dweck of Stanford University, is that the praise and attention prodigies receive leads them to instinctively protect their 'magical' status by taking fewer risks, which eventually slows their learning.

The talent hotbeds are not built on identifying talent, but on constructing it. They are not overly impressed by precociousness and do not pretend to know who will succeed. While I was visiting the US Olympic Training Centre at Colorado Springs, I asked a roomful of 50 experienced coaches if they could accurately assess a top 15–year–old's chances of winning a medal in the Games two years from then? Only one coach raised his hand.

If you have early success, do your best to ignore the praise and keep pushing yourself to the edges of your ability, where improvement happens. If you don't have early success, don't quit. Instead, treat your early efforts as experiments, not as verdicts."

(Daniel Coyle, 25 August 2012, The Independent)

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TAGS

Albert EinsteinattentionCarol DweckCharles Darwin • coach • Colorado Springs • constructing talent • creative potential • early success • effortless success • Fred Astaire • inheritance • instant success • Leo Tolstoylong-term successLouis Pasteur • Lucille Ball • magical status • Olympic Games 2012 • Olympic medal • Paul Gauguin • perseverance • praise • precociousness • prodigy • risk averserisk-takingStanford Universitytalent • talent hotbed • talent myth • Thomas Edison • top performers • US Olympic Training Centre • Walt DisneyWinston Churchill

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 NOVEMBER 2012

Dara Ó Briain's Science Club: The Story of Inheritance

"This first episode in a new six–part science series presented by Dara Ó Briain takes a look at the weird and wonderful world of reproduction and inheritance.

Dara chats to leading biologist Professor Steve Jones and finds out how the bicycle did more to improve the human immune system than any other invention, comedian Ed Byrne discovers just how closely related he is to a Neanderthal and materials scientist and engineer Mark Miodownik creates a DNA cocktail with the help of some strong Polish vodka.

Dara is also joined by neuroscientist Tali Sharot, who explores the cutting–edge science of epigenetics and reveals how exercise can change your DNA. Science journalist Alok Jha asks if the human genome project was oversold and the studio audience are put to the test in the elusive search for attraction.

Combining lively and in–depth studio discussion with exploratory films and on–the–spot reports, Dara Ó Briain's Science Club takes a single subject each week and examines it from lots of different and unexpected angles, from sex to extinction, Einstein to space exploration and brain chemistry to music. It brings some of the world's foremost thinkers together to share their ideas on everything, from how to avoid asteroid impact to whether or not we are still evolving."

(BBC Two, UK)

Fig.1 this animation is from Episode 1 or 6 of Dara Ó Briain's Science Club, Tuesday 6 November at 9pm on BBC Two, animated by 12Foot6, Published on YouTube on 5 Nov 2012 by BBC.

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TAGS

12Foot619532D2D animationAlok Jhaanimated information graphicsanimation • Antonie van Leeuwenhoek • AristotleBBC TwobloodcellchromosomeDara O BriainDNA • double helix • Ed Byrne • egg • epigenetics • female testicles • fly • Francis Crick • Francis Galton • genes • Gregor Mendel • history of ideashuman genome projectillustration to visually communicate informationinheritance • James Watson • Mark Miodownik • materials scientist • miniature • Niels Stensen • ovaries • ovary • peas • preformationism • reproduction • Robert Bakewell • scienceScience Club (tv) • science series • sequential artsexsperm • Steve Jones • story of sciencestudio audience • studio discussion • Tali Sharottree of lifevisual representations of scientific concepts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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