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Which clippings match 'Scott Snibbe' keyword pg.1 of 1
29 APRIL 2012

Boundary Functions: personal space exists only in relation to others and changes without our control

"Boundary Functions shows us that personal space exists only in relation to others and changes without our control. ...

By projecting the diagram, the invisible relationships between individuals and the space between them become visible and dynamic. The intangible notion of personal space and the line that always exists between you and another becomes concrete. The installation doesn't function at all with one person, as it requires a physical relationship to someone else. In this way Boundary Functions is a reversal of the lonely self–reflection of virtual reality, or the frustration of virtual communities: here is a virtual space that can only exist with more than one person, and in physical space.

The title, Boundary Functions, refers to Theodore Kaczynski's 1967 University of Michigan PhD thesis. Better known as the Unabomber, Kaczynski is a pathological example of the conflict between the individual and society: engaging with an imperfect world versus an individual solitude uncompromised by the presence of others. The thesis itself is an example of the implicit antisocial quality of some scientific discourse, mired in language and symbols that are impenetrable to the vast majority of society. In this installation, a mathematical abstraction is made instantly knowable by dynamic visual representation."

(Scott Snibbe, 1998)

Fig.1 Scott Snibbe (1998). "Boundary Functions".

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TAGS

1998art installationboundariesboundary functionsdynamic visual representationdynamically changingfloorgeometryindividualindividual and society • individual solitude • installationinteraction patternsinteractive artinteractive floorinteractive projection • Jonathan Shewchuk • linesmathematical abstractionmathematicspartition of spacepatternpatternspersonal spacephysical interaction • physical relationship • physical spaceprojected from overhead • proxemics • psychology • regions • relationships between individuals • scientific discourse • Scott Snibbesocial interaction • social relationships • Theodore Kaczynski • unabombervideo trackingvirtual spacevoronoiVoronoi diagram

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 NOVEMBER 2003

Fuel: Visualising Network Traffic

"Fuel is a field of stars, fueled by network traffic. Stars emit energy, grow and collapse as quanta of traffic pass through them. Each star is an IP that is part of your network, or being accessed by your network – a burning entity whose position is determined by passing the host address through secure encryption. Every local network has a unique constellation of fixed and transient hosts.

Fuel is a Carnivore–client that is designed to illustrate network traffic through the presentation of virtual stars. The programme interprets the changing dynamics of network traffic and presents it as evolving virtual stars."
(Scott Snibbe)

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TAGS

Carnivore • cosmic • Fuel • galaxyinterstellarmappingnetwork trafficScott Snibbevisualisation
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