Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Flat Colour' keyword pg.1 of 1
25 FEBRUARY 2016

Forms in Nature: Understanding Our Universe

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TAGS

20162D animationant • bee • birdsbright coloursbutterflycell division • Charley Harper • chimpanzee • Chromosphere (studio) • David Kamp • digital aesthetics • eclipse • fishflat colourflat spacefrog • gerridae • illustrative styleinsectjellyfish • jesus bugs • Kevin Dart • living creatures • moon landingNational Science Foundation • National Science Programme • natural worldnature • Nelson Boles • nest • night sky • observatory • optic nerve • outer space • pollination • pond skater • seal • shark • snail • space launch • space shuttle • Stephane Coedel • terrestrial ecosystemvolcano • water bug • water skipper • water strider • wildlife

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 NOVEMBER 2015

Light projection works by American artist James Turrell

"For over half a century, the American artist James Turrell has worked directly with light and space to create artworks that engage viewers with the limits and wonder of human perception. ...

Turrell often cites the Parable of Plato's Cave to introduce the notion that we are living in a reality of our own creation, subject to our human sensory limitations as well as contextual and cultural norms. This is evident in Turrell's over eighty Skyspaces, chambers with an aperture in the ceiling open to the sky. The simple act of witnessing the sky from within a Turrell Skyspace, notably at dawn and dusk, reveals how we internally create the colors we see and thus, our perceived reality. ...

Turrell's medium is pure light. He says, 'My work has no object, no image and no focus. With no object, no image and no focus, what are you looking at? You are looking at you looking. What is important to me is to create an experience of wordless thought.'"

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aesthetic experienceallegory of the cavechamber • childhood fascination • colour and lightcolour fieldcolour light • colour projection • design formalismflat colourformalist design aestheticsgeometric primitive • high-intensity projector • human sensory limitations • immaterialityimmersive experienceimmersive works • interior and exterior spaces • James Turrelllarge scale worklightlight and spacelight artlight projectionlight works • no focus • no image • no object • non-representationalNorth American artistop art • open sky spaces • perceptual psychology • physical presence of lightpresence • projection pieces • projection works • pure light • sensory form • sky • skyspaces • visual abstraction • wordless thought

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 JANUARY 2015

Allen Jones: the pop artist whose transgressions went too far

"Jones explains the situation, as he sees it. 'For artists of my generation, coming on stream in the Sixties, whatever you did you had to reckon with American gestural abstraction. The problem with figurative art at the time was that it had run out of steam, but the polemic was that you couldn't do it any more, which seemed absurd after 4,000 years of people making representations of each other. To me the Pop movement was incontrovertibly a swing of the pendulum back towards representation. The problem wasn't with representation, it was the age–old one – with the language. And the language had run out of steam. Using urban imagery as source material revitalised figurative painting, without a doubt. And recently the main thrust of the avant–garde from Basquiat and Schnabel up to Koons and company has been figuration with a vengeance.'"

(Andrew Lambirth 1 November 2014, The Spectator)

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1960s1969 • accepted canons • Allen JonesBritish artist • Chair (1969) • controversydeliberately offensive • demonised figure • female figure • figuration • figurative art • figurative painting • figurative sculptor • figurative work • fine artflat colourflat surfacefurniture • Hat Stand (1969) • human bodyICA • in the wilderness • Jean-Michel Basquiat • Jeff Koons • Julian Schnabel • leather boots • made to offendmannequin • ostracised • outrage • piece of furniture • political correctitude • political correctness • politically correct • pop art • pop artist • provocative art • realistic representation • representational art • retrospective exhibitionscantily cladsculpturesexist • sexually provocative • Table (1969) • tabootransgression • unwritten taboo • urban imagery • wig

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 SEPTEMBER 2014

A personal project to introduce a daughter to the Hungarian alphabet

"This book is the result of a very personal project aiming to introduce a little girl to the 44 letters of the Hungarian alphabet.

Illustrations were carefully designed so that every subject that appears in this book is something she's currently very much interested in. So in one way this book is not just a tool but also a diary documenting a four–year–old little girl's world in the summer of 2013 on an island in the Mediterranean Sea.

On the other hand though, hopefully it will also serve as an equally exciting source of knowledge and inspiration for anyone interested in language or design.

Ez a könyv egy személyes ajándék, aminek elsődleges célja, hogy megismertessen egy kislányt a magyar ábécé 44 betűjével.

Lgyekeztem min den itt előforduló illusztráció úgy elkészíteni, hogy azok az ő pillanatnyi érdeklődési körét legjobban tükrözzék. Így bizonyos szempontból ez a könyv nem csak egy eszköz, hanem napló is, ami, dokumentája egy négy éves kislány világbát 2013 nyarán, egy földközi – tengeri szigeten.

Másrészről viszont, remélhetőleg legalább enynyire izgalmas forráa lesz mindenki más számára is, akit egyszerűen csak érdekel a nyelv vagy a képek világa."

(Anna Kövecses, 2013)

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2013 • abeces konyv • alphabetalphabet book • Anna Kovecses • Blurb (self-publishing) • book illustrationbright colourschildrens bookchildrens book illustrationcolour fielddiary • early education • editorial designflat colourflat spaceFutura (typeface)Hungarian • Hungarian alphabet • Hungarian language • illustration • magyar • modernist aestheticsnostalgic tribute • preschool education • Reykjaviksans-serif typefaceself-publishing • stimulating imagination • teaching language • vibrant colourwomen illustratorsyoung girl

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 NOVEMBER 2012

The Fallen Easel: an evocative and visually stylish provisionality

"John Baldessari's 1987 work titled The Fallen Easel is made up of nine framed panels containing fragmentary images that seem to add up as a complex non sequitur. The lone diagonal panel shows a grayscale screen print of an easel laying on the ground, while other panels show faces and hands that are sometimes obscured by ovals of bright flat colors. Clearly, we see a rebus of sorts, but its substitution of picture–fragments for a syllogistic circuit remains just outside of the grasp of routine readability. Mentally reassembling them does not help, and the narrative context that would enable the work to be analyzed in the manner of a dream is missing. We can only conclude that the relationship between the work's diverse elements is one of an evocative and visually stylish provisionality, but we remain haunted by it, for it keeps us coming back in search of the key that will unlock its beguiling mystery of allegorical displacements and substitutions. Yes, this is an update of a kind of surrealism, but there is something else going on here as well, something pertaining to the typical psychological distance created by mass media imagery striped of its pretense of narrative coherence. All at once, the linked histories of Surrealism, Pop Art, Conceptual Art and Postmodernism flash before our eyes. We are not in Kansas anymore, but is unclear exactly where we are or where anything else is for that matter."

(Mark Van Proyen, November 2009, art ltd. magazine)

Fig.1 John Baldessari (1987). "The Fallen Easel" colour lithograph and screenprint in five parts printed on paper and aluminium plates. Collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer. Photo: courtesy of Legion of Honor Museum.

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1987allegorical displacements • allegorical substitutions • allegory • beguiling mystery • colour lithograph • complex non sequitur • composition • compositional practice • conceptual art • diverse elements • easel • flat colourfragmentary • fragmentary images • framed panels • John Baldessari • Legion of Honor Museum • linked histories • mass media • narrative coherence • narrative context • non sequitur • not in Kansas anymore • obscured view • oval • picture fragmentspop artpostmodernism • pretense • print retrospective • provisional • provisionality • psychological distance • readability • rebus • routine readability • screenprintsurrealism • syllogism • syllogistic circuit • The Fallen Easel • unlock • visually stylish provisionality

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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