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Which clippings match 'Single-minded Spaces' keyword pg.1 of 1
21 MARCH 2015

Inside the White Cube: The Ideology of the Gallery Space

"A gallery is constructed along laws as rigorous as those for build­ing a medieval church. The outside world must not come in, so windows are usually sealed off. Walls are painted white. The ceil­ing becomes the source of light. The wooden floor is polished so that you click along clinically, or carpeted so that you pad soundlessly, resting the feet while the eyes have at the wall. The art is free, as the saying used to go, 'to take on its own life.' The discreet desk may be the only piece of furniture. In this context a standing ashtray becomes almost a sacred object, just as the firehose in a modern museum looks not like a firehose but an esthetic conundrum. Modernism's transposition of perception from life to formal values is complete. This, of course, is one of modernism's fatal diseases."

(Brian O'Doherty, 1986)

Brian O'Doherty (1986). "Inside the White Cube: The Ideology of the Gallery Space", The Lapis Press.

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TAGS

1976 • aesthetic conundrum • art is free • artistic modernism • Brian O Doherty • clean design • clean white box • design formalismform and function • formal values • functional formgallery spacesideology of the gallery spaceinterior architecturemedieval church • modern museum • modernist aestheticsmodernist design principlesmorphology • neutral gallery space • neutral space • neutral white box • non-placeobjectivity • painted white • polished wooden floor • programmed useregulationsacred spacessingle-minded spacesspatial configurationspatial literacy • structural features • symbolic place • symbolic structures • Thomas McEvilley • transposition of perception • tyranny of modernism • tyranny of modernist aesthetics • white box • white cube • white wa

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 SEPTEMBER 2013

Window shopping with Kate Spade Saturday's touchscreen storefront

"Kate Spade Saturday has taken up residence in New York with four pop–up digital stores appearing as window fronts around the city. ... Standing in front of the window, shoppers can click to explore looks, opt to buy them via PayPal, and best of all have them delivered with an hour to wherever they are in the city thanks to a partnership with eBay. Security also isn't a concern–despite being a giant screen, the initiative doesn't ask for credit card information or your address for every other passerby to see, instead texting you with a link that leads you to your window shop bag on your own phone instead."

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TAGS

2013 • 24hr shopping • click to exploreclothing companyclothing retailer • designer brand • digital storefront • digitally enhanced pop-up shop • eBayfuture interfacesglassyhaptic interfacein-personinteraction designinteractive display • interactive touchscreen • Kate Spade • Kate Spade New York (designer brand) • Kate Spade Saturday (clothing label) • m-commerceNew Yorknon-place • PayPal • pictures under glass • pop-up digital store • pop-up shopprogrammed useretail spaceretail storesingle-minded spaces • store window • storefronttouchscreen • touchscreen storefront • visual facade • William McComb • window display • window front • window shopping

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 SEPTEMBER 2011

Tesco opens virtual store in South Korea

"Tesco Homeplus in South Korea has opened what it claims is the world's first virtual store in Seoul subway, following an initial trial in July.

Using the walls of the Seonreung subway station in downtown Seoul, Tesco has displayed more than 500 of its most popular products with barcodes which customers can scan using the Homeplus app on their smartphones, then get it delivered to their homes.

It opens on the same day that in the UK Ocado unveiled its virtual shopping wall at London's One New Change shopping centre.

In Seoul, Tesco shoppers scanning products on their way to work can get a delivery that evening if the order is placed before 11.30am. The store will be open for three months.

It follows an advert Tesco ran in South Korea in July for a virtual shopping wall, created by Cheil Worldwide. The initial launch created excitement so Tesco decided to push ahead with a full launch."

(Jennifer Creevy, 25 August, 2011, Retail Week)

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TAGS

2011barcode • Cheil Worldwide • digital storedigital storefrontdigitally enhanced shop • downtown Seoul • dwell time • home delivery • Homeplus app • Koream-commercemobile commercenon-place • One New Change (shopping centre) • QR codesQuick Response coderetail conceptsretail spaceretail storeretailing • Seonreung subway station • Seoulshoppingshopping experiencesingle-minded spacesSouth Koreastore of the futurestorefrontsubwaytechnological innovationTesco • Tesco Homeplus • UK Ocado • virtual shop • virtual shopping • virtual shopping wall • virtual store

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 OCTOBER 2003

Augé: spaces of programmed use as non-places

The French Anthropologist Marc Augé uses the expression non–place to describe the effect on an environment that is caused by programmed use. Where instructions for use determine our engagement with a space, where the complexity of interaction is reduced to symbolic meaning. For Augé main roads no longer take travellers on cultural excursions, they facilitate expedient traversal and cultural detachment. In short they transform places designed to be occupied into transport conduits. In environments where there is a sustained use and inhabitation of a space fixed regional character exists. Group and personal identity are established via association with geographic and cultural sites. Places appear to exist as dynamic and vital entities, with ownership and belonging. Environments that are exclusively defined as being operational tend to lack clearly attributable character or identity. They are spaces that are used for their purpose and act in reference to other places. ATM machines, airports and motorways all function in this way. They are single–minded spaces that elicit simple directed use. As regions grow they tend to instigate more and more ways for their occupants to travel, transforming points–of–departure and destinations into methods of transport. At the same time they tend to erode established regional identities and associations. Extended choice tends towards homogenous and generic identity.


Augé, Marc. 1995 Non–Places: Introduction to an Anthropology of Supermodernity, London/New York, : Verso.

TAGS

conduit • cultural excursions • detachmentengagementenvironmentinhabitationMarc AugeModernnon-placeprogrammed usesingle-minded spaces • Super-Modernity • symbolic meaning

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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