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Which clippings match 'Electronic Age' keyword pg.1 of 1
15 AUGUST 2013

Print is Flat, Code is Deep: The Importance of Media-Specific Analysis

"Many critics see the electronic age as heralding the end of books. I think this view is mistaken. Books are far too robust, reliable, long–lived, and versatile to be rendered obsolete by digital media. Rather, digital media have given us an opportunity we have not had for the last several hundred years: the chance to see print with new eyes and, with that chance, the possibility of understanding how deeply literary theory and criticism have been imbued with assumptions specific to print. As we continue to work toward critical practices and theories appropriate for electronic literature, we may come to renewed appreciation for the specificity of print. In the tangled web of medial ecology, change anywhere in the system stimulates change everywhere in the system. Books are not going the way of the dinosaur but the way of the human, changing as we change, mutating and evolving in ways that will continue, as a book lover said long ago, to teach and delight."

(Katherine Hayles, 2004)

Katherine Hayles (2004). "Print is Flat, Code is Deep: The Importance of Media–Specific Analysis" Poetics Today, Volume 25, Number 1, Spring 2004, pp. 67–90.

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TAGS

2004analogue and digital • analogue resemblance • bookscodecritical enquirycritical practices • cyborg reading practices • digital coding • digital media • distributed cognitive environments • electronic age • electronic hypertext • electronic literature • embodied entities • emergent property • end of booksend of printevolving form • instantiation • interpretation of signsKatherine Haylesliterary criticismliterary theorymaterialitymedia ecologiesmedia specificity • media-specific analysis • medial ecology • medium specificitymutabilitynatural languageobsolete medium • physical characteristics • physical specificity • recombination • renewed appreciation • signification • signifying strategies • somnolence • spaces to navigate • specificity of printtextstransformable • versatile medium • women in cultural theory

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 MARCH 2013

Overt technological change witnesses an enduring tradition

"In 2005, visitors packed into the expansive boulevard leading up to St. Peter's Square as Pope John Paul II's body was carried into the crowd for public viewing in the days following his death. Taken nearly two years before the iPhone debuted, the photo is striking now for its appearance straight out of another era.

For anyone who has ever been to a concert, the photo at bottom, taken Tuesday night as Pope Francis made his inaugural appearance on the Vatican balcony, seems almost ordinary. The two, taken together, reflect a world changing, even as some ancient traditions stay the same."

(Carlo Dellaverson, 13 March 2013, NBC News)

Fig.1 Luca Bruno / AP, The faithful gather in 2005 near St. Peter's to witness Pope John Paul II's body being carried into the Basilica for public viewing.

Fig.2 Michael Sohn / AP, St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican, on March 13, 2013.

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TAGS

20052013ancient traditions • another era • ArgentinacacophonyCatholic • Catholic leader • changing behaviourschanging timeschanging worldChristian • concert • digital ageelectronic ageinaugural addressiPhone • Jorge Mario Bergoglio • mobile phone • NBC News • participative mediaphotoPopePope Francis • Pope John Paul II • ritual • St Peters Square • symbolic behaviourtradition • Vatican City • visitors

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 NOVEMBER 2012

A modern-day Luddite longing for the slow elegance of print culture

"Sven Birkerts, a modern–day Luddite, is feeling uneasy about all this rapid cultural change. He longs for the slow elegance of print culture. So much so, in fact, that the cover of his new book, [The Gutenberg Elegies: The Fate of Reading in an Electronic Age], features a fuzzy caramel–colored snapshot of a naturally–lit library which houses the endangered species of digital modernity: a leather armchair draped with an afghan, droopy lace curtains, and shelves of softened leather hard–backs coveting thick yellowed pages and the tidy, immutable thoughts of yesterday's literary prophets.

Birkerts is terrified that his warm dusty paradise is being ransacked, and the remaining rubble is merely forgotten or misunderstood in a world distracted by garish, pulsing iconography."

(Amanda Griscom, 1996)

Amanda Scott Griscom (1996). "Trends of Anarchy and Hierarchy: Comparing the Cultural Repercussions of Print and Digital Media", Brown University.

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TAGS

1996 • Amanda Griscom • authentic cultural iconauthenticitybookcultural changecultural codescultural materialismdesign essentialism • digital modernity • electronic ageend of print • garish • hardback • hardbound • hardcover • humanisation of technologyludditenatural • Ned Ludd • nostalgianostalgic yearningobsolescence • print culture • readingromanticism • Sven Birkerts • The Gutenberg Elegies • tradition

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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