Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Derivative Works' keyword pg.1 of 1
04 JUNE 2017

Girl Talk's Gregg Gillis On Copyright, Curation and Making Mashups Rhyme

"When you listen to the recorded version of Girl Talk's music, it's hard not to get involved with the 'Name That Tune' game of it. ...

You might think that someone who uses other people's music so freely would disdain any notion of copyright, but Gillis, in fact, has a very balanced and contemporary viewpoint. 'I basically believe in that idea [of Fair Use], that if you create something out of pre-existing media, that's transformative, that's not negatively impacting the potential sales of the artist you're sampling, if it's not hurting them in some way, then you should be allowed to make your art and put it out there. I think, even in the years of doing this, the conversation has shifted a good bit.' Gillis has found himself a mashup artist in a mashup culture, and he no longer has to explain what he's doing or defend it. It is telling that no artist that has been sampled by Girl Talk has ever complained."

(Anthony Wing Kosner, 7 October 2012, Forbes)

1
2

TAGS

2012copyrightderivative worksfair useForbesGirl Talk (music artist) • Illegal Art (record label) • mash-up • mash-up artist • mash-up culture • metatextuality • music remix • music samplingremix culture • sample-based music • transformative works

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 NOVEMBER 2012

Sita Sings the Blues: audience-distributed animated feature film

"I hereby give Sita Sings the Blues to you. Like all culture, it belongs to you already, but I am making it explicit with a Creative Commons Attribution–Share Alike License. Please distribute, copy, share, archive, and show Sita Sings the Blues. From the shared culture it came, and back into the shared culture it goes.

You don't need my permission to copy, share, publish, archive, show, sell, broadcast, or remix Sita Sings the Blues. Conventional wisdom urges me to demand payment for every use of the film, but then how would people without money get to see it? How widely would the film be disseminated if it were limited by permission and fees? Control offers a false sense of security. The only real security I have is trusting you, trusting culture, and trusting freedom.

That said, my colleagues and I will enforce the Share Alike License. You are not free to copy–restrict ('copyright') or attach Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) to Sita Sings the Blues or its derivative works.

Some of the songs in Sita Sings the Blues are not free, and may never be; copyright law requires you to obey their respective licenses. This is not by my choice; please see our restrictions page for more.

There is the question of how I'll get money from all this. My personal experience confirms audiences are generous and want to support artists. Surely there's a way for this to happen without centrally controlling every transaction. The old business model of coercion and extortion is failing. New models are emerging, and I'm happy to be part of that. But we're still making this up as we go along. You are free to make money with the free content of Sita Sings the Blues, and you are free to share money with me. People have been making money in Free Software for years; it's time for Free Culture to follow. I look forward to your innovations."

(Nina Paley)

1

TAGS

attribution-share alike • audience-distributioncoercioncontrol • copy-restrict • copyrightcopyright lawCreative Commonsderivative works • Digital Restrictions Management • disseminationDRMeconomic model • emerging economic models • film fundingfree contentfree culture • free culture movement • free softwarefreedom • making money • Nina Paley • old business model • open distribution • payment • permission • Ramayana • Share Alike License • shared culture • Sita Sings the Blues • support artists

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.