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26 NOVEMBER 2012

The Minister of Chance: a crowdfunded audio science fiction series

"The Minister of Chance is an audio Science Fiction Fantasy series in the tradition of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop and the best in radiophonics. It's free, and you get it by subscribing to the podcast.

The series is entirely funded by its listeners. We have very small budgets, and absolutely no money for publicity – which is why you haven't heard about it til now. You can help by telling everyone you know on Twitter, Facebook, your blog, any Sci–Fi or fantasy sites, reviewers you know, your mum...."

(Clare Eden, MoC Executive Producer)

TAGS

2012 • Athene Hyde • audience-distributionaudio drama • auditory science fiction • Bruce Collingwood • Chris Mock • Clare Eden • commissioning process • crowdfundingcrowdsourcing • Dan Freeman • Dan Hunt • Doctor Whodrama series • Eloise Whitmore • fantasy • fantasy series • free cultureJed Brophy • Jenny Agutter • Julian Wadham • Karl Philips • Kate Cornish • Keelan Gumbley • Lauren Crace • low budget • Margrethe Nandrup-Pettersen • Mark Lewis • MoC • open distribution • Paul Darrow • Paul McGann • podcastradioradio drama • radio series • radio show • radiophonic series • sci-fiscience fiction • science fiction fantasy series • Simon Dixon • Sylvester McCoy • The Minister of Chance • Thomas Moulton • Violet Lavinia Brown

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 NOVEMBER 2012

Sita Sings the Blues: audience-distributed animated feature film

"I hereby give Sita Sings the Blues to you. Like all culture, it belongs to you already, but I am making it explicit with a Creative Commons Attribution–Share Alike License. Please distribute, copy, share, archive, and show Sita Sings the Blues. From the shared culture it came, and back into the shared culture it goes.

You don't need my permission to copy, share, publish, archive, show, sell, broadcast, or remix Sita Sings the Blues. Conventional wisdom urges me to demand payment for every use of the film, but then how would people without money get to see it? How widely would the film be disseminated if it were limited by permission and fees? Control offers a false sense of security. The only real security I have is trusting you, trusting culture, and trusting freedom.

That said, my colleagues and I will enforce the Share Alike License. You are not free to copy–restrict ('copyright') or attach Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) to Sita Sings the Blues or its derivative works.

Some of the songs in Sita Sings the Blues are not free, and may never be; copyright law requires you to obey their respective licenses. This is not by my choice; please see our restrictions page for more.

There is the question of how I'll get money from all this. My personal experience confirms audiences are generous and want to support artists. Surely there's a way for this to happen without centrally controlling every transaction. The old business model of coercion and extortion is failing. New models are emerging, and I'm happy to be part of that. But we're still making this up as we go along. You are free to make money with the free content of Sita Sings the Blues, and you are free to share money with me. People have been making money in Free Software for years; it's time for Free Culture to follow. I look forward to your innovations."

(Nina Paley)

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TAGS

attribution-share alike • audience-distributioncoercioncontrol • copy-restrict • copyrightcopyright lawCreative Commonsderivative works • Digital Restrictions Management • disseminationDRMeconomic model • emerging economic models • film fundingfree contentfree culture • free culture movement • free softwarefreedom • making money • Nina Paley • old business model • open distribution • payment • permission • Ramayana • Share Alike License • shared culture • Sita Sings the Blues • support artists

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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