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Which clippings match 'Massive Open Online Courses' keyword pg.1 of 2
30 MARCH 2014

Canadian MOOC pioneers George Siemens and Stephen Downes

"Dr. Siemens, along with Stephen Downes, senior researcher at the National Research Council, years earlier had launched what is widely recognized as the first MOOC, in 2008. It was a course on learning theory offered through the University of Manitoba where Dr. Siemens then taught."

(Rosanna Tamburri, 12 February 2014, University Affairs)

TAGS

2008Athabasca UniversityCanada • Complexive Systems Inc • George Siemens • global strategy execution • integrated learning structures • knowledge • learning theory programme • Massive Open Online CoursesMOOCsNational Research Council of Canada • networked technologies • online learningoriginatorsocial media researchStephen Downes • Technology Enhanced Knowledge Research Institute • University of Manitoba

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JANUARY 2014

Massive Online Education Gets Less Massive

"The Web education phenomenon has hit a rough patch of late. After massive open online courses, or MOOCs as they're awkwardly called, lured tens of millions of dollars in venture funding and millions of users over the past two years, the dream of bringing a quality virtual education to anyone, anywhere isn't quite working out as planned.

Even Sebastian Thrun, the online education pioneer and founder of Udacity, told Fast Company in November that he's helped develop a 'lousy product' because so few students finish the digital courses."

(Ari Levy, 14 January 2014, Bloomberg L.P)

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TAGS

2014Bloomberg LPcompletion • declining interest • digital courses • education for everybody • education phenomenon • Fast Company • lousy product • Massive Open Online CoursesMOOCs • online education pioneer • quality virtual education to anyone • retention • rough patch • Sebastian ThrunUdacityutopian technological prophecyventure capital • venture funding • virtual education

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 DECEMBER 2013

Global Technology Outlook 2013: Personalised Education

"An industry at the brink of transformation: The education industry is at the brink of an IT–enabled transformation. This transformation is driven by a demand for quality education that outstrips supply especially in the growth markets, misalignment between education and employment needs, and impatience with inefficiencies of education systems. For example, the government of Brazil is already funding students to go abroad because of a shortage of education infrastructure and quality educators. If growth continues to follow the existing trajectory, India will need about 800 more traditional universities than current levels today of about 350 universities.

Today, the most talked about application of technology to address these gaps is the advent of Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOC, which are growing rapidly. Several startups have emerged including Udacity, Khan Academy and Coursera, with millions of students enrolled across hundreåds of countries. Large amounts of new data are being created, which thus far is untapped for its potential.

What is Personalized Education: Education today is mainly delivered on a one size fits all basis. This is a key cause of the poor quality and inefficiencies associated with the industry. Educational institutions can learn from healthcare by drawing the parallels of doctors to educators, patients to learners, medicine/treatment to courses/learning, and payers to education loan providers. From a technology point of view, the use of electronic health data to form patient records, derive evidence, and provide patient–centric personalized healthcare can be extended to education, with the formulation of digital student records helping to inform and provide personalized learning pathways based on the capabilities of the learner and the desired outcomes.

Implications for the industry: The education industry is ripe for innovation, as new business models are instantiated on the emerging new sources of data, in particular the longitudinal learning data (tracking student information over multiple years in multiple schools). Predictive and prescriptive analytics will be applied to improve outcomes and efficiency. Clustering learners into groups, assigning new learners to existing clusters, identifying when a learner is deviating from a particular path are some possible outcomes. Prescriptive analytics would identify personalized learning pathways, track progress, and provide feedback to ultimately improve timely graduations and employability. Combined with industry demand data, supply estimates could be provided and targeted courses created with intakes tweaked to meet estimated demand. What will it take to succeed?: Ultimately there are many stakeholders who will be involved in improving education. This includes academic institutions, state education departments, students, learning management systems (LMS) and MOOC providers, government social service agencies and corporations. In order to achieve their often–shared goals, particularly to improve graduation and employment rates, they'll need to come together to create an open platform for sharing this data and insights from the analytics."

(William LaFontaine, 2013, IBM Research)

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TAGS

2013 • Alabama State Education • analyticsBrazilCourseradata integration • demand for quality education • Desire2Learn • digital student records • e-learningeducationeducation and employment • education industry • education shortage • electronic health data • healthcareIBM • IBM Global Technology Outlook (GTO) • IBM Research • IndiaKhan Academy • learning management systems • LMSlongitudinal learning dataMassive Open Online CoursesMOOCsone-size-fits-all solution • outcomes and efficiency • patient records • patient-centric • personalised educationpersonalised healthcarepersonalised learning • personalised learning pathways • predictive analytics • prescriptive analytics • Qatar Supreme Education • study abroadUdacity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 NOVEMBER 2012

Elite Online Courses for Cash and Credit

"A consortium of 10 top–tier universities will soon offer fully online, credit–bearing undergraduate courses through a partnership with 2U, a company that facilitates online learning.

Any students enrolled at an 'undergraduate experience anywhere in the world' will be eligible to take the courses, according to Chip Paucek, the CEO of 2U, which until recently was called 2tor. The first courses are slated to make their debut in the fall.

After a year in which the top universities in the world have clambered to offer massive open online courses (MOOCs) for no credit, this new project marks yet another turning point in online education. It is the first known example of top universities offering fully online, credit–bearing courses to undergraduates who are not actually enrolled at the institutions that are offering them."

(Steve Kolowich, 15 November 2012, Inside Higher Ed)

TAGS

2012 • 2tor • 2U • academic integrity • admissions criteriabrand recognition • Brandeis University • consortiumCoursera (provider) • credit-bearing courses • disruptive innovationDuke UniversityedX • Emory University • free content • Georgetown University • high-touch • higher educationinstitutions • intellectual rigour • like-mindedMassive Open Online CoursesMOOCs • Northwestern University • on-campus course • online contentonline educationonline learningopen access higher educationopen coursewarepartnershippricereputation • revenue sharing • selective admissions criteria • top-tier universities • traditional university model • undergraduate courses • undergraduate experience • undergraduate programme • Universities of North Carolina • university brand • university enrolmentUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill • University of Notre Dame • University of Southern California • Vanderbilt University • virtual classroom experience • Wake Forest University • Washington University • Washington University in St. Louis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 NOVEMBER 2012

Do online courses spell the end for the traditional university?

"The future that [Sebastian] Thrun believes in, that has excited him more than self–driving cars, or sci–fi–style gadgets, is education. Specifically, massive online education free to all. The music industry, publishing, transportation, retail – they've all experienced the great technological disruption. Now, says Thrun, it's education's turn.

'It's going to change. There is no doubt about it.' Specifically, Thrun believes, higher education is going to change. He has launched Udacity, an online university, and wants to provide mass high quality education for the world. For students in developing countries who can't get it any other way, or for students in the first world, who can but may choose not to. Pay thousands of pounds a year for your education? Or get it free online?"

(Carole Cadwalladr, Sunday 11 November 2012, The Guardian)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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