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Which clippings match 'Berkeley (University Of California)' keyword pg.1 of 2
28 OCTOBER 2014

Questioning the goal of efficiency in contemporary culture

"Efficiency in human behavior is a goal that is rarely questioned in contemporary culture. This course will study and draw connections between disparate fields to trace the development and influence of this view. The course, drawing a mix of humanities and engineering students, will include readings and lectures on 19th and 20th century philosophers with discussions of new technology and team experimental projects.

Frederick Taylor, the father of industrial engineering, analyzed human motion to optimize industrial productivity, which had great influence on Henry Ford, military logistics, and Stalin. Michel Foucault traced the history of the minute analysis of human motion from Napoleon's methods for transforming peasants into soldiers to modern methods for reforming prisoners. Martin Heidegger claimed that 'efficient ordering' was the defining characteristic of modern culture. Through the course, students will learn to recognize how this obsession with efficiency for its own sake relates to technology and to their daily lives."

(Questioning Efficiency: Human Factors and Existential Phenomenology, UC Berkeley course syllabus, Fall 2006)

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Albert Borgmann • Anson Rabinbach • Anton BragagliaBerkeley (University of California)capture a moment of timechronophotographycooking in the kitchen • critique of technology • Dale Huchingson • dematerialization of objects in space • Eadweard Muybridgeefficiency • efficient ordering • Eliot Eliofson • Emily Fox • engineering students • Etienne-Jules Marey • everyday life • existential phenomenology • fotodinamismo • Frank Gilbreth • Frederick Taylor • geometric chronophotograph • goal • golfer • Henri BergsonHenry Ford • homemaker • Hubert Dreyfushuman behaviourhuman bodyhuman factorshuman factors in designhuman motion • Idris Khan • increased productivityindustrial engineering • industrial productivity • infinite continuity of time • James Gleick • Joseph Stalin • Ken Goldberg • kitchen • kitchen studies • lecture programmeLillian Gilbrethlong exposure • management science • Marcel DuchampMartin Heideggermeasure performancemetricisationmetricsMichel Foucault • military logistics • model kitchen • modern culture • modern homemaker • motion studiesNapoleon Bonaparte • Nude Descending a Staircase (1912) • objects in motion • obsession with efficiency • philosophy of technologyproductivity • reconstruction of movement • schematic phases • scientific goalssimultaneityslow motion photographystudying motiontechnologyThe Kitchen Practical (1929) • time and motion studies • time savingtime-motion studies • Umberto Boccioni • wasted motion

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 JULY 2013

Pioneering 1968 demo of experimental computer technologies

"On December 9, 1968, Douglas C. Engelbart and the group of 17 researchers working with him in the Augmentation Research Center at Stanford Research Institute in Menlo Park, CA, presented a 90–minute live public demonstration of the online system, NLS, they had been working on since 1962. The public presentation was a session of the Fall Joint Computer Conference held at the Convention Center in San Francisco, and it was attended by about 1,000 computer professionals. This was the public debut of the computer mouse. But the mouse was only one of many innovations demonstrated that day, including hypertext, object addressing and dynamic file linking, as well as shared–screen collaboration involving two persons at different sites communicating over a network with audio and video interface."

(Stanford University Libraries)

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1960s1968Augmentation Research Center at SRIBerkeley (University of California)computer historycomputer mousecomputer networksdemoDouglas Engelbart • Fall Joint Computer Conference • HCIhierarchical visualisation • human communication • human-computer interactionhyperlinkhypertexthypertext systeminformation spaces • information structures • information systems • interactive computing • keyboardlinking • multimedia demonstration • networked computer system • networked telecommunications systems • NLS • oN-Line System (NLS) • pioneeringpioneering technologySan Francisco • Stanford Research Institute • Stanford Universitytechnology pioneerUC Berkeley • video teleconferencing • videoconferencingvisionary ideaswindows metaphor • word processing • word processor • workstation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 JANUARY 2013

Online Educational Delivery Models: A Descriptive View

"Although there has been a long history of distance education, the creation of online education occurred just over a decade and a half ago – a relatively short time in academic terms. Early course delivery via the web had started by 1994, soon followed by a more structured approach using the new category of course management systems.1 Since that time, online education has slowly but steadily grown in popularity, to the point that in the fall of 2010, almost one–third of U.S. postsecondary students were taking at least one course online. Fast forward to 2012: a new concept called Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) is generating widespread interest in higher education circles. Most significantly, it has opened up strategic discussions in higher education cabinets and boardrooms about online education. Stanford, MIT, Harvard, the University of California–Berkeley, and others have thrown their support – in terms of investment, resources, and presidential backing – behind the transformative power of MOOCs and online education. National media outlets such as the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, and The Atlantic are touting what David Brooks has called "the campus tsunami" of online education.

Unfortunately, a natural side effect of this new interest in education and educational technology is an increase in hype and in shallow descriptions of the potential for new educational models to replace the established system. All too often, the public discussion has become stuck in a false dichotomy of traditional vs. online – a dichotomy that treats all online models as similar and that ignores blended or hybrid approaches. This false dichotomy is even more evident now that discussions are spilling into national media forums. But in fact, as my colleague Molly Langstaff has described, educational technology is interacting with innovative educational courses and programs to create not only new language but also multiple models for delivering education."

(Phil Hill, 1 November 2012, Educause Quarterly)

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1994Berkeley (University of California)blended learning • course delivery via the web • course management systems • David Brooks • distance educationeducation deliveringeducational technologyEducause QuarterlyHarvard Universityhigher education • hybrid learning • innovative educational courses • MIT • Molly Langstaff • MOOCs • new educational models • online coursesonline delivery • online models • Phil Hill • post-secondaryStanford Universitystructured approach • the campus tsunami • transformative process • University of California

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 NOVEMBER 2012

Do online courses spell the end for the traditional university?

"The future that [Sebastian] Thrun believes in, that has excited him more than self–driving cars, or sci–fi–style gadgets, is education. Specifically, massive online education free to all. The music industry, publishing, transportation, retail – they've all experienced the great technological disruption. Now, says Thrun, it's education's turn.

'It's going to change. There is no doubt about it.' Specifically, Thrun believes, higher education is going to change. He has launched Udacity, an online university, and wants to provide mass high quality education for the world. For students in developing countries who can't get it any other way, or for students in the first world, who can but may choose not to. Pay thousands of pounds a year for your education? Or get it free online?"

(Carole Cadwalladr, Sunday 11 November 2012, The Guardian)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 NOVEMBER 2012

Australia: people flock online for free university education

"THE NUMBER of people enrolled in free online subjects at Melbourne University has overtaken enrolments at its campuses in less than two months.

The university became the first Australian institute to join online education provider Coursera in September.

Since then more than 52,000 students have enrolled in the university's free massive open online courses, which will begin next year."

(Benjamin Preiss, 3 November 2012, The Age)

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2012 • academic credit • AustraliaBerkeley (University of California) • certificate of completion • challenges and changesCoursera (provider)coursewaredegree qualification • extend learning out • formal degree • free online education • free online university courses • generate interest • Harvard Universityhigher educationiTunes U • La Trobe University • Margaret Sheil • market regulationmarketizationMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyMassive Open Online CoursesmonitiseMOOCs • MyUniversity (site) • online courseonline education provideropen courseware • outlearning • outreach technology • paid online university courses • qualificationstechnology transforming learningUC Berkeleyuniversity degreeUniversity of Melbourne

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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