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Which clippings match 'Sequence' keyword pg.1 of 3
19 OCTOBER 2012

A Fistful of Dollars title sequence

"One of the most iconic title sequences ever made. A Fistful of Dollars (original Italian title: Per un Pugno di Dollari) was the first spaghetti western to gain widespread international recognition. After the film's initial release in Italy, it took three years until the film was released in the US, but Sergio Leone's revolutionary take on the western would ultimately change the genre altogether, as well as catapult the careers of Leone, main actor Clint Eastwood, and composer Ennio Morricone, whose enigmatic score still resonates today.

A Fistful of Dollars (1964) was the first film in Sergio Leone's 'Dollars' trilogy that also includes For A Few Dollars More (1965) and The Good, The Bad and The Ugly (1966). The opening title sequences for these three films were made by Italian graphic designer Iginio Lardani. Unlike Leone, Eastwood, and Morricone, Lardani did not win a one–way ticket to stardom. The designer who created one of the most iconic film title title sequences of the 20th Century, and whose bold, graphic, pop art–inspired main titles continue to inspire designers, animators and filmmakers today (see for instance Paul Donnellon's opening titles for Smokin' Aces), remains relatively unknown outside the Italian film industry.

Iginio Lardani passed away in 1986, but his son Alberto Lardani told me this anecdote: 'Sergio Leone's reaction when he first saw the title sequence for 'Per un Pugno di Dollari' was of great gratitude. Not only for its extraordinary iconic impact but also because it was designed for free.'"

(Remco Vlaanderen, 14 July 2011, WatchTheTitles)

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TAGS

19642D animationA Fistful of Dollarsanimated creditsClint EastwoodEnnio Morriconefilm genrefilm title artfilm title design • Iginio Lardani • Italianmain titlesmovie titleopening title sequence • Per un Pugno di Dollari • sequenceSergio Leonespaghetti western • title art • title design • title designer • title sequencetitles • trilogy • WatchTheTitles • western film genre

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 JUNE 2011

The hospital, contains the complete arsenal of modern healing, but is devoted to a radical deescalation of the medical process

"The hospital is a sequence of pavilions, each devoted to a particular disease. They are connected by a medical boulevard –a slow–moving belt that displays the sick in a continuous procession, with a group of dancing nurses in transparent uniforms, medical equipment disguised as totem poles, and rich perfumes that suppress the familiar stench of healing, in an almost festive atmosphere of operatic melodies.

Doctors select their patients from this belt, invite them to their individual pavilions, test their vitality, and almost playfully administer their (medical) knowledge. If they fail, the patient is returned to the conveyer; perhaps another doctor tries the patient, but it soon becomes apparent that the belt leads beyond the pavilions, through the cruciform building, and straight into the cemetery."

(Koolhaas, R., M. Vreisendorp, et al.)

Fig.1 – 9 Rem Koolhaas, Madelon Vreisendorp, Elia Zenghelis, and Zoe Zenghelis (1972). 'Exodus, or the voluntary prisoners of architecture'

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1972appropriation • architectural sequence • arsenal • boulevardcemeterycollage • continuous procession • conveyer belt • cruciform • cut-outcut-out illustrationdancingdiseasedoctor • Elia Zenghelis • exodus • festive atmosphere • graphic style • healing • hospitalillustrationimaginary landscapes • Madelon Vreisendorp • medical boulevard • medical equipment • medical knowledge • medical process • melody • modern healing • nurseoperationpatientpavilionperfumephotocollagephotomontageplayful • prisoners of architecture • radical deescalation • Rem Koolhaassequencespace-framespatial narrativesspeculative design • totem poles • uniform • urban speculation • vitality • Zoe Zenghelis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 MARCH 2011

Prezi: a tool that allows you to animate your presentation narrative

"Prezi lets you bring your ideas into one space and see how they relate, helping you and your audience connect. Zoom out to see the big picture and zoom in to see details – a bit like web–based maps that have changed how we navigate through map books."

(Prezi Inc., 2011)

[The tool provides a useful way of creating a 'presentation narrative'. In so doing it shifts the emphasis away from the 'content' of your presentation towards the sequential arrangement of ideas and their interrelationships.]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 MARCH 2011

Christian Marclay's The Clock: timekeeping through moments in cinema history

"'The Clock' is constructed out of moments in cinema when time is expressed or when a character interacts with a clock, watch or just a particular time of day. Marclay has excerpted thousands of these fragments and edited them so that they flow in real time. While 'The Clock' examines how time, plot and duration are depicted in cinema, the video is also a working timepiece that is synchronised to the local time zone. At any moment, the viewer can look at the work and use it to tell the time. Yet the audience watching 'The Clock' experiences a vast range of narratives, settings and moods within the space of a few minutes, making time unravel in countless directions at once. Even while 'The Clock' tells the time, it ruptures any sense of chronological coherence."

(White Cube, 2010)

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201024-hourappropriation • Christian Marclay • chronologicalchronologycinemacinema historyclockcontinuumcut-updurationfragmentarylinearmomentsorderingre-purposereal-timerecombinantremix culturerupturesequencesuture • synchronised • temporal • The Clock • timetime of day • timekeeping • timepiecevideo collagevisual literacywatch • White Cube Gallery • wrist watch

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 FEBRUARY 2011

Anne Lilly's kinetic sculpture motion design elegance

"I have questions that do not occur in words: questions about space, about material moving in space, and about the intermingling of space and object. I feel that space disguises itself and its nature by its transparency. It is, strangely, this very transparency that makes space opaque to our awareness. This new work uses skinny lines moving in space. Emptying out the volume reduces the visual mass so that more of the space around the work gets implicated in what the work finally is. The space shares in creating, or manifesting, the function of the work itself. This emptying–out of the mass makes it possible to imbue space without occupying space."

(Anne Lilly)

Fig.1 Parietals 2005;

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2005abstractionaestheticsanimation • Anne Lilly • azurebumble • choreographydesigndesign formalismdynamicelegancegeometry • graceful • kinetickinetic sculpturematerial moving in spacematerialsmechanismminimalmotionmotion designmovementobjectpatternrhythmsculpturesequencespacespace and objects

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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