Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Dignity' keyword pg.1 of 1
27 NOVEMBER 2015

100 Women 2015: Life for women in Islamic State's Raqqa

"Nour is a woman from Raqqa, the so-called Islamic State's (IS) capital inside Syria. She managed to escape the city and is now a refugee in Europe, where she met up with the BBC. This story is based on her experiences and those of her two sisters, who are still inside the IS-held city. Names and the timings of some events have been changed to avoid compromising the safety of Nour or her family."

(BBC News, 2015)

Video produced by Vladimir Hernandez, Faisal Irshaid and Najlaa Aboumerhi. Animation by Luis Ruibal.

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TAGS

2015asylum seekersautonomy • BBC 100 Women • BBC News • burka • burkha • burqa • civil liberties • cleric • clothing • concealment of the face • control societycruel mendaeshdignity • draconian law • dress code • face • face covering • face-covering • Faisal Irshaid • flagellation • flogging • freedoms • full face veil • gender inequality • harsh penalties • headgear • hesba • hyena • inspirational stories • life for women • Luis Ruibal • Najlaa Aboumerhi • niqab • oppression • perversion • punishment • Raqqa • refugeereligious fundamentalism • religious police • so-called Islamic State • subjugationsubordinate womenSyriaveil • Vladimir Hernandez • whipping • womens clothing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 NOVEMBER 2013

The x:talk project: a sex worker-led knowledge sharing co-operative

"In early 2006 several activists based in London who are involved in sex worker rights activism, organising within the International Union of Sex Workers in particular, began to conceptualise and organise around the x:talk project–one that would seek to explore and expand the ideas and confidence we have developed in criticising the mainstream human trafficking discourse, drawing on insights we have gained from sex workers', migrant and feminist struggles.

The racist and anti–feminist trafficking rhetoric of 'protection', mainstream anti–trafficking campaigns that reduce women to only passive victims, under the control of organised crime or of cruel men produces and justifies deportation of migrant sex workers and increases the criminalisation and exploitation of workers in the sex industry. It creates divisions between migrants' and sex workers' forms of organisation and resistance.

We found language and communication to be crucial elements to directly challenge and change conditions of work and life, and to come to together and to organise. Communication is in our view central to change. Language is a basic individual and collective power that improves both possibilities to work and possibilities of resistance.

Central to our vision stands the autonomy of all people moving across borders and the dignity of every gender employing their resources in the sex industry. Central to our understanding of gender and social relations is an understanding of sex work as labour. People who sell sex are involved in a labour process in many respects similar to other paid personal services exchanged on market. At the same time we recognise that the ways in which sex work has existed are also deeply interrelated to the ways in which 'female' services, such as caring, domestic, sexual and reproductive activities are supposed to be provided. It is important to consider that the demand for money for sex in a transparent and potentially contractual way is often a break and significant shift in the way women are expected to give these services for no remuneration.

We consider that a feminist analysis and practice is crucial to changing the sex industry. Women represent the majority of workers in the industry and gendered sexualised and reproductive labour have historically constituted a central part in the structures that subordinate and oppress women. The people that have taken the main initiative of this organisation and project are women. Starting from the ground up, in a grass roots way we nevertheless aim to work with the whole industry. Due to the demographics of the workforce in the sex industry, women play a central role in the organisation and are expected to make up a majority of participants in the classes. We/they represent the majority and we/they enjoy the strongest voice at the moment. However issues of gender and transgender difference–at their intersections with racial and sexual issues are taken into account in the development of activities in order to include people from across the industry and from diverse backgrounds.

In contrast to the current mainstream anti–trafficking policies and discourses we work towards the improvement of working conditions in the sex industry; for rights and recognition of workers; the right to change work and not to be forced to stay with the same employer and the right to stay and not to be deported. Our organisation is based on a practice of sex workers self organisation and our projects are primarily built on an activity of networking with those that have already organised similar projects according to these principles."

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TAGS

2006activism • anti-trafficking campaigns • anti-trafficking discourses • anti-trafficking policies • autonomyborders • co-operative • collective power • criminalisation • cruel men • deportation • dignity • domestic services • empowermentexploitation • female services • feminist analysisfeminist perspectivefeminist struggles • forced labour • gender and social relations • gender difference • gendered labour • grass roots • human trafficking • immigrant experience • International Union of Sex Workers • knowledge sharing • labour process • language barrierslanguage learnerslanguage of thingslanguage skillslanguages of legitimationLondon • migrant sex worker • migrant struggles • migrant workers • organised crime • passive victims • personal services • power relationsprostituteprostitutionprotectionracist language • remuneration • reproductive activities • reproductive labour • rights and recognition • safeguarding • safer conditions • sexsex industry • sex work • sex worker • sex worker rights • sex workers • sexual exploitation • sexual issues • sexual slavery • sexualised labour • subordinate womentrafficking • trafficking rhetoric • transgender difference • victimwomenworkforce • working conditions • x:talk project

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 SEPTEMBER 2013

The 1907 Exposition Coloniale de Vincennes

"Souvent oubliée, l'exposition coloniale de 1907 dont l'ambition se limitait aux colonies françaises a été organisé au bois de Vincennes, en lisière de la commune de Nogent–sur–Marne. Le lieu même de cette petite exposition organisée par la Société Française de Colonisation, est resté intact, et l'on peut encore se promener à travers quelques pavillons de 1907, même si certain ont subi les outrages irrémédiables du temps et de la tempête de 1998.

Cinq villages sont reconstitués (Indochine, Madagascar, Congo, Soudan, Tunisie, Maroc) selon les grandes possession de l'empire français. Les indigénes de ces colonies avaient été amené pour parfaire l'animation. Il s'agissait de locaux, à qui on avait proposé un contrat et un salaire pour venir en France habiter ces villages sensés montrer comment l'on vit là–bas. Une fois sur place il est indéniables que ces personnes faisaient le spectacle à l'encontre de ce qu'aujourd'hui on appellerait la dignité humaine. Le visiteur pouvait voir de ses propres yeux, ses indigénes dont on parlait aux actualités cinématographiques. Rites religieux, danses, artisanat, la limite de l'exibition était sans aucun doute dépassée."

(Sylvain Ageorges)

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TAGS

190719th centuryAboriginalalien and strange • bois de Vincennes • Cambodia • Colonial Exhibition (1907) • colonial historycolonial mentalitycolonial powercultural differencecultural hegemonycultural imperialismcultural narrativesculture and customs • degrading • Democratic Republic of Congodignity • ethnographic zoos • ethnological expositions • European imperialism • exotic populations • fictional settingFranceFrench empire • French Indochina • human dignity • human zoos • Jardin dAgronomie Tropicale • Laosliving history museumMadagascar • Morocco • native peoplenatives • negro villages • Nogent-sur-Marne • non-European peoples • patronisingpavilion • primitive state • racismreconstruction • scientific racism • social Darwinism • Societe Francaise de Colonisation • Sudan • Sylvain Ageorges • theme parkTunisia • unilinealism • Vietnam

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 JUNE 2013

The Stanford Prison Experiment

"Welcome to the Stanford Prison Experiment web site, which features an extensive slide show and information about this classic psychology experiment, including parallels with the abuse of prisoners at Abu Ghraib. What happens when you put good people in an evil place? Does humanity win over evil, or does evil triumph? These are some of the questions we posed in this dramatic simulation of prison life conducted in the summer of 1971 at Stanford University.

How we went about testing these questions and what we found may astound you. Our planned two–week investigation into the psychology of prison life had to be ended prematurely after only six days because of what the situation was doing to the college students who participated. In only a few days, our guards became sadistic and our prisoners became depressed and showed signs of extreme stress. Please join me on a slide tour describing this experiment and uncovering what it tells us about the nature of human nature."

(Philip G. Zimbardo)

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1971Abu Ghraib Prisonauthoritybrutalitycommand responsibility • Cool Hand Luke (1967) • dehumanisationdeindividuationdignitydisciplineethics • guard • guilthuman experimentationhuman naturehuman subjectshuman willhumiliationimprisonmentmoral dignitymoral dilemmamoralitynature of morality • Philip Zimbardo • powerpower corruptsprisonprisonerpsychology • research experiment • research study • self-controlsimulation studysocial experimentssocial responsibility • Stanford Prison Experiment • suffering injustice

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 NOVEMBER 2012

What is the Liverpool Care Pathway?

"The Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP) is a scheme that is intended to improve the quality of care in the final hours or days of a patient's life, and to ensure a peaceful and comfortable death. It aims to guide doctors, nurses and other health workers looking after someone who is dying on issues such as the appropriate time to remove tubes providing food and fluid, or when to stop medication.

However, its use for some has become controversial, with relatives reportedly claiming it has been used without consent, and some saying it is used inappropriately.

This criticism and the media emphasis on the supposed controversy is puzzling, as the LCP has been standard practice in most hospitals for a number of years. The LCP has also received recognition on both a national and international level as an example of good practice.

As a GP put it in the British Medical Journal, the LCP 'has transformed end of life care from an undignified, painful experience into a peaceful, dignified death at home'"

(NHS Choices, UK)

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TAGS

1990s • advanced illness • British Medical Journal • care • comfortable death • consent • controversydeath • death pathway • diedignitydyingemotional needsend of life • end of life care • end-of-life careeuthanasiagood practiceGPguide • health workers • healthcare • hospice • hospital • LCP (acronym) • life • Liverpool Care Pathway • Marie Curie Palliative Care Institute • media criticism • medication • multidisciplinary approach • National Health Service • NHS • palliative care • patientpatient care • peaceful • physical needs • plan of care • prolonging life • public health • quality of care • relieve suffering • Royal Liverpool University Hospital • social needs • spiritual needs • suffering • terminally ill • UK • undignified

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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