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Which clippings match 'End Of Life' keyword pg.1 of 1
12 JUNE 2015

Belief in the here and now: a Humanist perspective

Written & produced by the British Humanist Association, and narrated by Stephen Fry. Animated by Hyebin Lee. Thank you to Alom Shaha, Craig Duncan, Andrew Copson, and Sara Passmore That's Humanism logo design by Nick Cousin

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TAGS

2D animationafterlifeanimated short filmbelief systemsbeliefs • biological death • British Humanist Association • consciousnesscontemplating mortalitydeathdisembodimentdyingend of life • eternal life • existentialismfaith • faith in nature • fulfilmentheaven • here and now • human consciousnesshumanism • Hyebin Lee • life • making the most of life • material realitymaterial worldmortalitynothingnessobjective realityrationalist perspectiverealm of existence • reincarnation • spiritualityStephen Fry

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 AUGUST 2013

A proof of concept of technology which is born to die

"John Rogers is a professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the university. Rogers says the goal of the 'born to die' program is to design transient technology that can dissolve at the end of its useful life, thus saving space in landfills and reducing waste. The research team isn't there yet. But it has designed a chip built on a thin film of silk that dissolves when hit with water."

(Associated Press)

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TAGS

applied research • Associated Press • born to die • design innovationdesign intelligencedesign responsibilitydisposable consumption • dissolvable materials • e-wasteelectronicsend of lifeimpermanenceinorganic refuse • John Rogers • material interventionsmaterial worldmaterials sciencenew materialsobsolescenceproof of conceptself-destroyingself-destructing • silk • thin filmthrow-away • transient tech • transient technology • University of IllinoisUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign • useful life • water soluble

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 NOVEMBER 2012

What is the Liverpool Care Pathway?

"The Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP) is a scheme that is intended to improve the quality of care in the final hours or days of a patient's life, and to ensure a peaceful and comfortable death. It aims to guide doctors, nurses and other health workers looking after someone who is dying on issues such as the appropriate time to remove tubes providing food and fluid, or when to stop medication.

However, its use for some has become controversial, with relatives reportedly claiming it has been used without consent, and some saying it is used inappropriately.

This criticism and the media emphasis on the supposed controversy is puzzling, as the LCP has been standard practice in most hospitals for a number of years. The LCP has also received recognition on both a national and international level as an example of good practice.

As a GP put it in the British Medical Journal, the LCP 'has transformed end of life care from an undignified, painful experience into a peaceful, dignified death at home'"

(NHS Choices, UK)

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TAGS

1990s • advanced illness • British Medical Journal • care • comfortable death • consent • controversydeath • death pathway • diedignitydyingemotional needsend of life • end of life care • end-of-life careeuthanasiagood practiceGPguide • health workers • healthcare • hospice • hospital • LCP (acronym) • life • Liverpool Care Pathway • Marie Curie Palliative Care Institute • media criticism • medication • multidisciplinary approach • National Health Service • NHS • palliative care • patientpatient care • peaceful • physical needs • plan of care • prolonging life • public health • quality of care • relieve suffering • Royal Liverpool University Hospital • social needs • spiritual needs • suffering • terminally ill • UK • undignified

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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