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05 SEPTEMBER 2014

EDUCAUSE: 7 things you should know about flipped classrooms

"The flipped classroom is a pedagogical model in which the typical lecture and homework elements of a course are reversed. Short video lectures are viewed by students at home before the class session, while in–class time is devoted to exercises, projects, or discussions. The video lecture is often seen as the key ingredient in the flipped approach, such lectures being either created by the instructor and posted online or selected from an online repository. While a prerecorded lecture could certainly be a podcast or other audio format, the ease with which video can be accessed and viewed today has made it so ubiquitous that the flipped model has come to be identified with it.

The notion of a flipped classroom draws on such concepts as active learning, student engagement, hybrid course design, and course podcasting. The value of a flipped class is in the repurposing of class time into a workshop where students can inquire about lecture content, test their skills in applying knowledge, and interact with one another in hands–on activities. During class sessions, instructors function as coaches or advisors, encouraging students in individual inquiry and collaborative effort."

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TAGS

2012 • 7 Things You Should Know About • active learningactivity-based instructionactivity-based learning designs • application of ideas • atelier model • class time • course podcasting • Educause • EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative • flipped approach • flipped classroomsflipping the classroomgroup tutorialshands-on activitieshomework • hybrid course design • in-class time • individual enquiry • learning and teachinglearning initiativelearning modellearning through practicepedagogic approachespedagogical modelpedagogy • short video lectures • student engagementstudio approachstudio practiceteaching methodsteaching practicestechnology transforming learninguniversity teachingvideo lectureworkshop sessions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 JANUARY 2014

Do teaching models in higher education need reinventing?

"Michael Barber, chief education adviser of the world's largest education firm, Pearson, has been reported saying middle–ranking UK universities could face extinction within the next 10 years if they don't find a way to 'mark themselves out of the crowd'. He said the traditional lecture model is outdated and remarked it was pointless for 100 universities to develop the same courses when 'the best professors are making their course available for free'.

If it's not just universities that face extinction, but university lectures too, is it time to rethink the way academics teach in universities? How do lecturers now see their role in higher education? And what do they think is the teaching model of the future?"

(Claire Shaw, 12 March 2013, Guardian Professional)

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TAGS

2013academic professionals • academic profile • Andrew Bollington • CourseraedX • flipped academics • flipped classroomsflipping the classroomfuture of education • FutureLearn • Guardian Professional • HElearning and teachinglecture formatlecture/laboratory format • Michael Barber • MOOCsonline coursesonline learningPearson • sustainable models • teaching methodsteaching practicesteaching resource • traditional lecture model • traditional methods • traditional practices • traditional teaching methods • UdacityUK universitiesuniversity teaching

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 OCTOBER 2012

Constructivism: a recent perspective on learning with ancient roots

"Constructivism is a recent perspective or philosophy on learning with ancient roots (von Glasersfeld, 1995) that has extensive implications for the use of collaborative learning tools. In employing constructivism, some teachers believe that better learning occurs when knowledge is the result of a situated construction of reality (Brooks, 1990). Unfortunately, although constructivist revolutionaries have ventured onto the battlefield of epistemological change, most have not provided practicing educators with the wherewithal to reconstitute and embed constructivist ideas within their personal philosophies and teaching practices. Teachers might, in fact, design useful constructivistic learning environments and strategies, but may not recognize that they operate from a constructivist paradigm (Harris & Pressley, 1991). Even when constructivism is recognized as valuable, few guidelines exist for implementing and assessing it. So, when CSCL tools enter the instructional arsenal of public schools and higher education settings, constructivism may not be the theory of choice. And, undoubtedly, many scholars and researchers fuel this problem with intense debates that most practitioners simply lack the time and energy to deal with (e.g., see Ernest, 1995; von Glasersfeld, 1995).

Further muddying the debate, there is no canonical form of constructivist theory. Cobb (1994) identified two variations – cognitive constructivist and social constructivist – and there are undoubtedly more. Cognitive constructivists tend to draw insight from Piaget and focus on individual constructions of knowledge discovered in interaction with the environment ... Social constructivists rely more on Vygotsky (1978) and view learning as connection with and appropriation from the sociocultural context within which we are all immersed."

(Curtis Jay Bonk, Donald J. Cunningham and Kira S. King, p.32)

Bonk, Curtis Jay; Cunningham, Donald J. Bonk, Curtis Jay (Ed); King, Kira S. (Ed), (1998). "Searching for Learner–Centered, Constructivist, and Sociocultural Components of Collaborative Educational Learning Tools" in Electronic collaborators: Learner–centered technologies for literacy, apprenticeship, and discourse., (pp. 25–50). Mahwah, NJ, US: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates Publishers.

TAGS

etter learning • canonical form • cognitive constructivist • collaborative learning tools • Computer Supported Collaborative Learningconstructivism • constructivist paradigm • constructivist theory • constructivistic learning environments • constructivistic learning strategies • CSCL • CSCL tools • Curtis Jay Bonk • Donald J. Cunningham • embed constructivist ideas • epistemological change • epistemological divergence • Ernst von Glasersfeld • individual constructions of knowledge • interaction with the environment • Jacqueline Grennon Brooks • Jean Piaget • Karen Harris • learningLev Vygotsky • Michael Pressley • Paul Cobb • Paul Ernest • personal philosophies • philosophy on learning • practicing educators • reconstitute constructivist ideas • situated construction of realitysocial constructivistsocio-constructivismsocio-constructivist • sociocultural context • teaching practices

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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